Friday, May 27, 2016

{78} Descendants of Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory (1775-1853)

"In my foolish notions of right and wrong I have always thought Tom Noel unhappy, or unhappiest in being situated as dependant where by dint of a few words from infallible Church said over his parental congress, he needed not to have recurred to her for tithes instead of the nine remaining parts of ye property." - Lord Byron, December 1822.
2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1745-1815)
[Portrait by Daniel Gardner c.1780]

Rev. Thomas Noel, rector of Kirkby Mallory, is one of the rare instances of an illegitimate child of a peer receiving mention in Burke's Peerage (107th Edn., 2003, p. 2442, sub Lytton). Conceived four months after his father had succeeded as 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough, and born at the end of 1775, Tom lived with his sister Anna Catherine, six years his senior, and their mother Anna Caterina van Loo, the Belgian-born Catholic mistress of Viscount Wentworth, for the first six years of  his life, until his mother's death in 1781. "My chief anxiety is about the poor Children," Viscount Wentworth wrote to his aunt Mary Noel (1725-1802) two days later, "which are truly dear to me, & as fine ones as can be...The Boy I shall educate well, & inculcate into him that his future livelihood must depend on some profession he may chuse." Viscount Wentworth stayed true to his word, sending his son to Rugby School in Warwickshire, where, in his last half-year, his father proudly wrote that Tom had "grown a devilish handsome strapping fellow." In April 1792, Viscount Wentworth sent his son to his own alma mater, Christ Church Oxford, and Tom Noel seems by that point to have decided on the career of a clergyman, for he was baptized in the Anglican church two days prior to his admission.

In the summer of 1795, having completed his third year at Christ Church, Tom Noel accompanied his cousin Sophia Curzon (1779-1849) to Ravensworth Castle in county Durham, the seat of Sir Thomas Liddell, 6th Baronet (1775-1855, later 1st Baron Ravensworth) and his widowed mother. There, Tom and Elizabeth 'Betsy' Liddell, the 21-year-old eldest sister of the baronet, fell in love. Thinking that Viscount Wentworth would settle a generous inheritance on his only son, the dowager Lady Liddell encouraged the romance. "Nothing could make me happier than seeing Tom so very respectably settled & his forming so enviable a connection," Viscount Wentworth wrote to his sister Judith, Lady Milbanke, "but surely I could wish that no Step might be taken without giving time & particularly to the Lady to reflect on future consequences." Once it became clear to Lady Liddell that Viscount Wentworth was both unwilling and unable (he had many debts and his properties were heavily mortgaged) to provide immediately for his son, she insisted that her daughter break off with Tom Noel. Two months later, Viscount Wentworth discovered that his son's "vanity was the only part much hurt by his dismission." Seven months later in May 1796, Tom Noel received his bachelor's degree from Oxford and eloped.
1811 engraving of Normanton Turville Hall, Leicestershire
"Tom has Stole a Match with Kitty Smith" and "must lie in the bed he had made for himself," Viscount Wentworth reported to his sister Judith Milbanke.  Catherine Smith was the 22-year-old daughter of Holled Smith, a Leicestershire attorney who had died the previous summer. Having lost her mother when she was thirteen years old, Catherine, the fourth of five surviving daughters, was a close neighbour to Viscount Wentworth and his son, for Normanton Turville Hall, her father's seat, was less than 5 miles from Kirkby Mallory. Left to her own devices immediately following her father's death, as her only brother Thomas Grace Smith (1770-1812) was distracted with the £33,000 sale of Normanton Turville, Catherine and Tom Noel found sympathy for their secret romance from Catherine's elder sister Susannah (née Smith) Coxe (1768-1836), and were married by her husband Rev. Richard Coxe, Vicar of Bucklebury. Though only recently elevated to the status of landed gentry - Holled Smith hadn't inherited Normanton Turville Hall, he had purchased it in the early 1780s - the Smiths could nevertheless claim descent from the Lord Protector Somerset (and so two lines from Edward III).

Edward III had two sons A1 & B1 (see below)
A1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
A2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
Lord Protector Somerset -
see Generation A8
A3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
A4) Lady Elizabeth Percy (c.1395-1437) m. 1) John, 7th Lord Clifford (1388-1422, descended from Edward I), and had
A5) Mary Clifford (c.1420-by 1458) m. Sir Philip Wentworth of Nettlestead (1424-1464), and had
A6) Sir Henry Wentworth of Nettlestead (1448-1499) m. 1) Anne Say (c.1448-aft.1489), and had
A7) Margery Wentworth (c.1478-1550) m. Sir John Seymour of Wolf Hall (c.1474-1536), and had
A8) Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, Lord Protector (c.1500-1552) m. 2) Anne Stanhope (see B6 below), and had
A9) Lady Elizabeth Seymour (1550-1602) m. Sir Richard Knightley of Fawsley Hall (1533-1615, descended from Edward I), and had
A10) Sir Seymour Knightley of Norton (1580-1640) m. Dorothy Bedell (d. 1633), and had
A11) Anne Knightley (c.1620-1699) m. Dr. Jonathan Holled of Cottingham (1612-1680), and had
A12) Rev. Knightley Holled of Barby (c.1650-1700) m. Anne Mayne (d. 1730), and had
A13) Anne Holled (c.1680-1766) m. John Smith of Leire (1672-1742), and had
A14) Knightley Smith of Leire (c.1710-1740) m. Darell Jervis (1713-1740), and had
A15) Holled Smith of Normanton Turville Hall (1732-1795) m. Elizabeth Grace (1738-1786), and had
A16) Catherine Smith (1773-1832), first wife of Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory
Anne (née Stanhope),
Duchess of Somerset
 -
see Generation B6

B1) Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester (1355-1397) m. Lady Eleanor de Bohun (1365-1399, descended from Edward I), and had
B2) Anne Plantagenet, Countess of Buckingham (1383-1438) m. 3) William Bourchier, 1st Count of Eu (c.1374-1420), and had
B3) William Bourchier, 9th Lord FitzWarin (c.1409-1469) m. 1) Thomasine Hankford (1423-1453), and had
B4) Fulk Bourchier, 10th Lord FitzWarin (1445-1479) m. Elizabeth Dinham (c.1450-1516), and had
B5) Elizabeth Bourchier (c.1478-1557) m. 3) Sir Edward Stanhope of Rampton (1469-1511), and had
B6) Anne Stanhope (c.1510-1587) m. 1) Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (see A8 above)

Likely it was Tom Noel's stepmother Countess Ligonier who smoothed things over between her husband Viscount Wentworth and his impulsive son, for Tom named his firstborn child, which followed nine months after his wedding, 'Mary' in his stepmother's honour. In 1798, Viscount Wentworth was reconciled enough to Tom that he presented him the livings of Kirkby Mallory and Elmsthorpe. Rev. Noel received his Master's degree from Oxford in 1801, and settled down for the next dozen years as the rector of Kirkby Mallory. In 1812, he asked for, and was granted, the honour of performing the wedding ceremony of his cousin Anne Isabella Milbanke, the legal heir of Viscount Wentworth, to Lord Byron. The poet took a ring from his finger and gave it to Rev. Noel as a souvenir of the occasion, but one of Tom's daughters wrote to a friend, "Papa expects something more substantial for the service he has rendered Lord Byron."
Judith Noel, Lady Milbanke
(1751-1822)

Byron's observation of Rev. Noel's unhappiness proved right on the mark. In his later years, Tom was increasingly frustrated by the inheritance situation following his father's death in 1815. To provide for his two illegitimate children Viscount Wentworth stipulated in his will that his Gloucestershire estates were to be sold for payment of his debts and to provide legacies for his children. Judith Milbanke had laboured determinedly for the past two decades to insure that Viscount Wentworth designated her and her only daughter as his legal heirs, and Judith even agreed to her brother's stipulation that she, her husband, her daughter and even her son-in-law Lord Byron all had to legally assume the surname Noel. Judith triumphantly moved into Kirkby Hall immediately on inheriting it, and never left it again. With her usual incapacity for seeing any perspective other than her own, she then legally blocked her brother's executors from selling his Gloucestershire estates. In 1816, Rev. Noel and his sister Mrs. Biscoe, both with large families, sued their father's trustees, Judith, and her husband for a settlement under the terms of their father's will. Not blessed with the several manors and estates of the Milbankes and Noels which Judith had successfully combined, Viscount Wentworth's two children needed the cash he had stipulated for them to help provide for their families, and didn't have the luxury of waiting for property values to increase, which seemed to be Judith's goal in delaying the sale. Judith once referred to Tom's wife Catherine as "a poor timid low-spirited creature," so it's no surprise that when she took possession of Kirkby Hall, Rev. Noel appointed a fellow prelate to perform the clerical duties of the parish, and vacated Kirkby Mallory.
Kirkby Mallory Rectory in late 19th-century
Judith's death in 1822 prompted Rev. Noel's request to Lord Byron to intercede with Lady Byron, the new legal owner of Kirkby Hall, to obtain a promise that, following his death, the living of Kirkby Mallory should be given to one of his sons. Though Annabella, Lady Byron (later 11th Baroness Wentworth) was a far more generous lady of the manor than her mother had been, the damage Judith had caused Rev. Noel ran too deep. He wrote bitterly to Annabella in 1846: "Madam a stranger has afforded me the assistance of the loan of £60 which your silence or contempt on my application denied me, & from which the Consanguinity betwixt us and your ample means derived from my late Father you could so readily afford to his Publicly acknowledged son. Much of his property you are now enjoying had he not been so suddenly seized with paralysis he meant to leave to me & my sister, as He stated to me previous to his leaving Kirkby for London for the purpose of altering his will."

Lady Byron's refusal to loan money to Rev. Noel could have been a result of his own foolish behaviour. After the death of his wife Catherine in 1832, Rev. Noel seems to have moved to Calais, perhaps fleeing creditors. In 1838, at the age of 62, he made a second marriage there, to the 30-year-old Henrietta Fisher, an Englishwoman from Kent, and in 1846, when he was refused the loan by Lady Byron, they had two infant sons. His five surviving children from his first marriage, grown-up and starting families of their own, with the financial support of Lady Byron, were dismayed by their father's second wife and family. Rev. Noel felt betrayed enough by one of his sons, Charles Noel, who had accepted Lady Byron's offer in 1831 to serve as her resident land agent at Kirkby Mallory with an annual income of £100, that he cut him out of his will. Rev. Noel died in Plymouth at the age of 77 in the summer of 1853, leaving dual families: a 45-year-old widow with two young sons, aged 10 and 8, and grown children with families of their own scattered throughout England, Germany and Greece. It's evident that, thanks to the support of Lady Byron, the children of Rev. Noel's first marriage did much better in life than the two young sons of his second marriage. When his widow Henrietta died in Plymouth in 1878, her estate was valued at less than £300. Her elder son Vincent Noel had become a physician, but sadly died of scarlet fever at age 23 while treating an outbreak of it in Plymouth. The younger son Henry Noel, was the only one of Rev. Noel's six sons to follow in his footsteps and become a clergyman. He became rector of a parish in Manchester, and died there in 1893 leaving two sons of his own. The elder, Ternan Noel, a labourer who immigrated to Canada and died in a psychiatric facility, and the younger, Archibald Noel, a bookkeeper in Manchester - a far cry from the lectures at Christ Church and summers at Kirkby Hall and Ravensworth Castle that their grandfather had experienced.
Gatehouse of Christ Church Oxford
Rev. Noel spent the last four decades of his life focused on his father's will and the unfairness of the Wentworth inheritance. The bitterness is completely understandable. Viscount Wentworth spent the last twenty years of his life at Kirkby Mallory with his son Tom the young rector, and the county locals certainly viewed Tom as the natural heir to the manor. The History of Leicester in the Eighteenth Century (1871) even goes so far as to say (pp. 157-8): "The family is now represented by Lord Wentworth, the grandson of the late Lady Noel Byron, and by the male descendants of the last Viscount, who (it is believed) duly contracted a marriage on the Continent with Catherine Louisa Van Loo--a Belgian lady--but not according to the rites of the Church of England. The offspring of this union was Thomas, afterwards the Rev. Thomas Noel, Rector of Kirkby Mallory." If his mother's Catholicism was indeed the only reason keeping Tom from legitimacy, it's a real shame as there's every indication that Tom Noel would have made a worthy peer. His marriage to Elizabeth Liddell would have been a far more brilliant match than his father's to Countess Ligonier, and demonstrates Tom had the ability and personality to surpass his father's limited achievements and influence at court and in the political arena. That Rev. Noel ended his life stewing under the assumption that he had been cheated from an inheritance is sad, for the appointment of Charles Noel as land agent shows that Lady Byron, unlike her obsessively ambitious mother, recognized an importance in keeping the Noel line at Kirkby Mallory.

Charles, the son Rev. Noel felt inclined to cut out from inheritance, was able to reach a state his father never could: forgiveness. He wrote to Lady Byron: "Relating to the will of my late Father I wish to place on record my earnest desire in relation to that document. First I freely forgive the dead. Next I wish to prove to the widow that I cannot in hope of a future world before my eyes use the same weapons in defence...and I trust that I may be enabled to live and die without receiving in any way benefit from my Father's property." That a son engaged in a material career proved more spiritual in the end than a father engaged in a clerical one may not be so unusual among the 19th-century English clergy. Lord Byron deferred to his estranged wife on the matter of Rev. Noel, "she is a better judge of parsons than me."

Rev. THOMAS NOEL, Rector of Kirkby Mallory 1798-1853, b. 28 Dec. 1775 England, bap. 25 Apr. 1792 St Marylebone, London; d. 22 Aug. 1853 Plymouth, Devon, bur. 29 Aug. 1853 Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth, illegitimate son of Thomas Noel, 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1745-1815, descended from Edward III) and Anna Catherina Vanloo (d. 1781); m. 1st 7 May 1796 St Mary Church, Bucklebury, Berkshire, CATHERINE SMITH, b. Claybrooke, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, bap. 21 Aug. 1773 St Mary Church, Lutterworth; d. 11 Mar. 1832 Norris Hill, Hampshire, dau. of Holled Smith of Normanton Turville Hall (1732-1795, descended from Edward III) and Elizabeth Grace (1738-1786), and had issue, five sons and five daughters; m. 2nd 1 Mar. 1838 Town Hall, Calais, France, HENRIETTA ELIZABETH FISHER, b. 27 July 1808 Gravesend, Kent, bap. 28 Jan. 1812 St George Church, Gravesend; d. 27 Aug. 1878 St Stephen-By-Saltish, Cornwall, bur. 30 Aug. 1878 Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth, dau. of Thomas Fisher of Gravesend (d. 1814) and Mary (?)Milgate, and had further issue, two sons.
Town Hall, Calais, France

Issue of Rev. Thomas and Catherine (Smith) Noel:

1) MARY GEORGIANA NOEL, b. 11 Feb. 1797, bap. 11 May 1797 St Peter & St Paul Church, Yattendon, Berkshire; d. unm. 25 Sept. 1815 Malvern, Worcestershire.

2) CATHARINE JUDITH NOEL, b. 6 Apr. 1798, bap. 29 May 1798 St Peter & St Paul Church, Yattendon; d. unm. 19 May 1815 Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire.

3) THOMAS NOEL of Boyne Cottage, Cookham, Berkshire, poet, b. 11 May 1799 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 13 May 1799 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 22 May 1861 Brighton, Sussex; m. 29 Jan. 1831 All Saints Church, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, as her 1st husband, EMILY ANNE HALLIDAY, b. 13 Oct. 1812 Ham Lodge, Surrey, bap. 6 Nov. 1815 All Saints Church, Kingston upon Thames; d. 7 Dec. 1882 Rochdale, Lancashire, yr. dau. of Capt. Francis Alexander Halliday of Ham Lodge (1773-1830, descended from Henry VII) and Anne White (1777-1840), and had issue, two sons and one daughter.

Issue of Thomas and Emily Anne (Halliday) Noel:

3A) THOMAS HALLIDAY NOEL, b. 1845 Boyne Cottage; d. 1859 Brighton.

3B) EMILY ELIZA NOEL, b. 1849 Boyne Cottage; d. 31 Jan. 1934 West Norwood, Surrey; m. 29 June 1869 St Nicholas Church, Brighton, JOHN GEORGE CHARLES SCHULER of West Norwood, language instructor, b. 16 Jan. 1847 Stuttgart, Württemberg, Germany, bap. there 7 Feb. 1847; d. 27 Mar. 1919 West Norwood, son of Johann Georg Schuler of Stuttgart and Friedrike Regine Menninger, and had issue, six sons and four daughters.
Noel of Kirkby Coat of Arms

3C) BYRON BRUCE NOEL of Evenwood, Ockham, Surrey, land agent to Earl of Lovelace, b. 14 Nov. 1851 Boyne Cottage; d. 3 Apr. 1909 Evenwood, bur. 8 Apr. 1909 All Saints Church, Ockham;  m. 1874 Kensington, London, AMY ELFORD ADAMS, b. 6 Nov. 1854 Aberdeen, Scotland, bap. 26 Nov. 1854 Old Machar, Aberdeen; d. 1 Mar. 1940 Heathfield House, Brockenhurst, Hampshire, only dau. of Capt. William Elford Adams  of Aberdeen (1822-1856) and Anna Maria Bannerman (1829-1904, descended from James I of Scotland), and had issue, six sons and seven daughters.

4) ROWNEY NOEL [son], b. 20 June 1800 Kirkby Mallory, bap. there same day; d. 25 June 1800 Kirkby Mallory, bur. there same day.

5) JANE NOEL, bap. 31 Aug. 1801 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; bur. there 13 Oct. 1801.

6) Maj. ROBERT RALPH NOEL of Brompton, Middlesex, Leicestershire Regiment Militia, phrenologist, bap. 28 Oct. 1802 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d.s.p. 3 July 1883 Brompton; m. 1838 Germany, LOUISE VON HENNIGEN, b. 1813 Bohemia; d.s.p. 27 Apr. 1885 Brompton.

7) SOPHIA ANNE NOEL, b. 26 July 1805 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 2 June 1876 Richmond, Surrey; m. 20 Aug. 1833 St Martin Church, Bryanston, Dorset, Lt. LIONEL HALLIDAY of St Helier, Jersey, b. 5 Mar. 1803 Ruxbury, St Anne's Hill, Surrey, bap. 2 May 1803 St Peter Church, Chertsey, Surrey; d. 23 Jan. 1846 Dinan, Brittany, France, est son of Capt. Francis Alexander Halliday of Ham Lodge (1773-1830, descended from Henry VII) and Anne White (1777-1840), and had issue, three sons and three daughters.
All Saints Church, Leamington Priors

8) CHARLES NOEL of Leamington Priors, Warwickshire, land agent for Lady Byron, b. 7 June 1809 Kirkby Mallory (twin with sister Anna Frances), bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 7 May 1857 Leamington Priors, bur. 9 May 1857 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; m. 2 June 1836 St Catherine Church, Burbage, Leicestershire, MARY ANNE DYKE, bap. 30 Apr. 1802 St Catherine Church, Burbage; d. 20 Apr. 1857 Leamington Priors, bur. 23 Apr. 1857 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors, dau. of Rev. Jerome Dyke of Burbage (1771-1837) and Mary Sheppard (1775-1826), and had issue, one son and two daughters.

Issue of Charles and Mary Anne (Dyke) Noel:

8A) MARY AUGUSTA NOEL, governess, b. 1837 Kirkby Mallory; living 1861 - further history not known[*1].

8B) CATHERINE EMMA NOEL, bap. 4 Aug. 1838 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; living 1857 - further history not known[*1].

8C) CHARLES EDWARD NOEL of Purbrook Cosham, Hampshire, bap. 24 July 1840 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. unm. 19 May 1876 Portsmouth, Hampshire.

9) ANNA FRANCES NOEL, b. 7 June 1809 Kirkby Mallory (twin with brother Charles), bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. unm. Apr. 1833 Bloomsbury, London, bur. 27 Apr. 1833 St Mary Church, Hanwell, Middlesex.
Edward Henry Noel (1811-1884)

10) EDWARD HENRY NOEL of Hampstead, Middlesex and Achmetaga, Euboea [today Evia], Greece, b. 18 June 1811 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 29 Feb. 1884 Hampstead, bur. 5 Mar. 1884 St Mary Church, Hendon, Middlesex; m. 18 June 1838 St Mary Church, Ealing, Middlesex, FRANCES ISABELLA DOYLE, b. 1819 Bengal, India; d. 5 Nov. 1845 Torquay, Devon, bur. 11 Nov. 1845 St Saviour Church, Tormohun, Devon, dau. of Maj-Gen. Carlo Joseph Doyle (1787-1848) and Chiano Begum (d. by 1820), and had issue, two sons and three daughters.

Issue of Edward Henry and Frances Isabella (Smith) Noel:

10A) IRENE SELINA NOEL, b. 22 May 1839 Athens, Greece, bap. 23 May 1839 St Paul Anglican Church, Athens; d. unm. 1855 Piraeus, Attica, Greece, bur. Athens.

10B) EDITH CATHERINE NOEL, b. 25 Oct. 1840 Athens, bap. 25 Dec. 1840 St Paul Anglican Church, Athens; d. in infancy 5 July 1841 Trieste, Italy.

10C) EDGAR CARLO NOEL, b. 12 Feb. 1842 Leamington Priors; d. in infancy there Oct. 1842.

10D) ALICE MARY NOEL, b. 27 Feb. 1843 Leamington Priors, bap. 4 Sept. 1844 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; d.s.p. 10 Apr. 1929 Hampstead; m. 2 July 1885 St John Church, Hampstead, JOHN ARCHIBALD MURRAY MACDONALD of Browns Copse, Heyshott, Sussex, M.P. Bow & Bromley 1892-95, M.P. Falkirk Burghs 1906-18, b. 9 Oct. 1854 Strachur, Argyllshire, Scotland; d.s.p. 16 Jan. 1939 Browns Copse, son of Rev. Hugh Ferguson MacDonald of Strachur (d. 1901) and Christina McIver (d. 1883).
Alice (née Noel) MacDonald
(1843-1929)

10E) FRANCIS EDWARD NOEL of Achmetaga, b. 31 July 1844 Leamington Priors, bap. 4 Sept. 1844 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; d. 28 Sept. 1919 Achmetaga, bur. there; m. 26 Feb. 1876 St Stephen Kensington, London (divorce c.1885), EDITH ELLEN VINER, bap. 8 Aug. 1856 All Saints Church, St John's Wood, Middlesex; bur. 19 Aug. 1893 St Peter Church, Turnham, Buckinghamshire, yst dau. of Thomas Viner, coffee merchant, of Ceylon & Wavendon Lodge, Woburn, Buckinghamshire (c.1808-1884) and Emma ---, and had issue, one son and one daughter.

Issue of Rev. Thomas and Henrietta Elizabeth (Fisher) Noel:

11) Dr. VINCENT EDMUND NOEL of Plymouth, Devon, physician, bap. 11 June 1843 St Andrew Church, Plymouth; d. unm. 6 Dec. 1866 Plymouth, bur. 11 Dec. 1866 Ford Park Cemetery.

12) Rev. HENRY ANTHONY NOEL, Rector of St Clements Longsight, Manchester, Lancashire 1881-93, b. 27 Mar. 1845 Plymouth, bap. 12 June 1845 St Andrew Church, Plymouth; d. 12 May 1893 St Clements Rectory, Longsight; m. 26 May 1869 St Clement Danes, London, JANE ELIZABETH O'NEIL, b. 1842 Rame, Cornwall; d. Dec. 1909 Chorlton, Manchester, bur. 4 Jan. 1910 Southern Cemetery, Chorlton, dau. of Capt. Henry O'Neil of Plymouth (1812-1884) and Mary Cole, and had issue, two sons and one daughter.

Issue of Rev. Henry Anthony and Jane Elizabeth (O'Neil) Noel:

12A) IRENE MAY NOEL, b. Halifax, Yorkshire, bap. 28 Mar. 1870 All Saints Church, Salterhebble, Yorkshire; d. 24 Jan. 1925 Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire; m. 19 Apr. 1894 St Clements Longsight, as his 1st wife, ROBERT ASTLEY HOPWOOD of Manchester, Master Merchant Marines, bap. 3 Nov. 1868 St Philip Hulme, Manchester; d. 1942 Lancashire, est son of Richard Hopwood of Manchester, lithographic printer (1847-1906) and Maria Louisa Robinson (1845-1933), and had issue, two sons and two daughters.

12B) TERNAN OSWALD NOEL of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, labourer, b. 29 Jan. 1873 Banchory, Aberdeenshire, Scotland; d. unm. 11 Apr. 1924 Protestant Hospital for the Insane, Verdun, Quebec.
Protestant Hospital for the Insane, Verdun, Quebec
12C) ARCHIBALD RANDOLPH PERCY NOEL of Manchester, "invoice clerk", bap. 7 Oct. 1877 St Stephen Church, St Stephens by Saltash, Cornwall; d.s.p. 2 Nov. 1940 Levenshulme, Manchester; m. 1 Aug. 1903 St Agnes Church, Birch in Rusholme, Manchester, ANGELINA MAY GREGORY, b. 1875 Manchester; d.s.p. 11 May 1943 Levenshulme, dau. of William Gregory of Manchester, bookkeeper, and Sarah Elizabeth Peers.

[*1] Mary Augusta Noel last appears on record in the 1861 Census as a governess, while her sister Catherine Emma last appears on record in their father Charles Noel's 1857 will. It's possible either or both sisters married, though neither has a readily apparent entry in the England Marriages 1837-1915 Index. Nor is there a readily apparent death entry for either sister in the England Deaths 1837-1915 Index. Administration of the estate of their brother Charles was granted in 1876 to their uncle Robert Ralph Noel, which suggests both sisters had predeceased their brother, though it's also possible one or both had emigrated from England.

The next blogpost will examine the Edward III descents for Francis Noel-Baker, M.P., a descendant of Rev. Thomas Noel.

Cheers,                                   ------Brad

Thursday, May 19, 2016

{77} Edward III Descents for Mary (née Henley), Countess Ligonier (c.1750-1814)

Henley Coat of Arms
[Azure, a lion rampant argent,
crowned with a ducal coronet or,
in a bordure argent, charged
with eight torteauxes
]
It's taking me longer than I had originally thought it would to enter the descendants of the 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough into my database. So far, tracing them has led to a forester in Ontario, Canada, a florist in Philadelphia (both early 20th-century North American immigrants descended from Henry VII), and the wife of a Nobel Peace Prize winner, among several others. They hopefully will make a fascinating series of posts starting early next week. In the meantime, I'll turn in this post from the descendants of the 2nd Viscount Wentworth, to the ancestry of his wife.

"The most liberal & the best of Women My Dearest Mary" is how Viscount Wentworth referred to his wife in a letter he wrote to his sister Lady Milbanke in the summer of 1791. Lady Milbanke, however, whose ambition often out-paced her intelligence, and who, from the evidence of her letters and behaviour, showed symptoms of what today is called anxiety disorder, felt otherwise about her sister-in-law, who outranked her both in birth and title: she blamed her for what she perceived was a coldness from her brother. "It really hurts me very much that my Brother should have so little desire to see my Child," Judith Lady Milbanke whined in a letter to her aunt Mary Noel (1725-1802) in the summer of 1797. The child was Annabella Milbanke, whom Judith had given birth to five years previous when aged 40, and whom the lady was determined to make not only the heiress of the Milbankes but that of the Noels as well. Judith's letter prompted a reprimand from her aunt, an experienced woman who saw people in a far more well-rounded light than her temperamental niece: "I am very sure your Brother loves you as much as he can love anything but his dear Mary...It is not now in any bodys power to do you & yours any Injury, as most of his estate was primarily settled upon you & your heirs by his Marriage Settlement after her...She [Mary] certainly does shew the greatest regard & love for him, & is very good to him in money matters, & you know he was always a dupe to the female he lived with, & when all is said we have all our prejudices."
Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington
(c.1708-1772)

Lady Mary Henley was born in 1751, the third of the five daughters of Robert, 1st Earl of Northington, a cabinet minister who had been high in favour with King George III, receiving both his earldom and the position of Lord Chancellor of England from that monarch. Northington died when Lady Mary was age 20, and two years later in 1773, she married Edward, Viscount Ligonier, a handsome military officer whose first marriage to the unfaithful Penelope Pitt had ended in a scandalous divorce. Though married over eight years, Mary was unable to provide her husband, promoted to the rank of Major-General in 1775, and created Earl Ligonier of Clonmell the following year, with an heir to succeed to his titles. His premature death in 1782 at the age of 42 left Countess Ligonier a widow in her early 30s, with a sizeable fortune, increased when her brother the 2nd Earl of Northington died childless in 1786, leaving Mary and their other four sisters as his coheirs. Small, delicate and kind, Countess Ligonier enjoyed playing cards and the latest fashions, and fell in love with Thomas Noel, 2nd Viscount Wentworth in the months following her brother's death. He had a tarnished past: he had taken a Catholic mistress while on the continent, with whom he lived for several years in England, fathering two children with her. They had separated before her 1781 death, and he had begun a romance with Lady Anne Lindsay (1750-1825), which when he met Countess Ligonier was still ongoing. When Lady Anne eventually broke off with Viscount Wentworth, he turned to Countess Ligonier, and the 42-year-old Wentworth wed Mary, in her late 30s, in February 1788.

The Henleys were a Somerset family descended from a Marian martyr in Taunton. They were granted arms in 1612 and acquired a dozen properties, mostly small, in south-west Somerset and west Dorset, as well as a couple of manors in Devon. The senior branch, seated at Leigh in the parish of Winsham, Somersetshire, rose less rapidly in rank and wealth than their Hampshire cousins, but was the first to marry into the Edward I bloodline when Henry Henley of Leigh (c.1612-1696) took for his second wife Bridget Bampfylde (d. 1657), from the gentry family long established at Poltimore House in Devon. But the Countess Ligonier sprung from the junior branch of the family, founded by Henry's first cousin Robert Henley of Soper Lane, London (d. 1656) who, by his successive occupation of two immensely lucrative offices, first as a Six Clerk in Chancery, and then as chief clerk of the King’s bench (worth £22,500 by his own account), outstripped the senior line both in wealth and status. Robert Henley acquired considerable property in Somerset, Dorset and Hampshire, besides an ‘adventure’ of 5,500 acres in the fens. Henley bequeathed £10,000 to his second (and namesake) son, Robert Henley (c.1624-1692), together with some houses in Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Cavaliers during the Civil War, at the Restoration, the younger Robert Henley was able to enjoy the reversion to the King’s bench office, worth £4,000 a year. He brought the bloodline of Edward I to his branch of the family when, as a childless widower, he married in February 1663, Katherine, the fifth of the nine daughters of Anthony Hungerford of Fairleigh Castle. Her father having died five years prior in 1657, it was Katherine's widowed mother, Rachel (née Jones) Hungerford, who consented to the match. What the Henleys lacked in pedigree was more than made up for in financial stability. Money ran through the hands of Katherine's eldest brother Sir Edward Hungerford (1632-1711), the new family head, like water--at one point he is said to have paid 500 guineas for a wig--so it must have been a relief to him, as well as to his mother, that Katherine was marrying a man so financially well-off. Though Katherine's marriage portion could not have been large, she brought to her husband a lineage that stretched back centuries: the Hungerfords could trace their line back to the 12th century, had held a barony during the tumultuous 15th century, and in 1663 could still claim the status of the leading family in Wiltshire. In addition, Katherine's father Anthony Hungerford had inherited from his childless elder brother, the magnificent Farleigh Castle in Somersetshire. Robert Henley celebrated his marriage into the Hungerford family by taking one of his properties, The Grange, a modest house in the parish of Northington, Hampshire, and turning it into an impressive four storey red brick residence which he made his chief seat. When he died in 1692, Robert Henley left his son and heir Anthony an inheritance said to be worth £3,000 per year.
The Grange, in Northington, Hampshire
With no children of her own, Countess Ligonier was able to bestow generosity on her new husband and his family: her fortune was able to help pay off most of Viscount Wentworth's debts, she was attentive to his spinster aunt Mary Noel, and accepting and supportive of her illegitimate stepchildren. Though she apparently lacked warmth (General Bowater, an old family friend of the Noels, referred to her as "almost to an Icycle" in 1805), Countess Ligonier earned the devotion of her husband, who was inconsolable at her death in 1814, and followed her to the grave less than a year later.

1st Earl Ligonier of Clonmell
(c.1740-1782)
Lady MARY HENLEY, b. 20 Sept. 1751; d.s.p. 29 June 1814 Kirkby Hall, Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire, bur. All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, 3rd dau. of Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington (c.1708-1772 - see A14 below) and Jane Husband (1716-1787 - see B15 below); m. 1st (lic. 16 Dec.) 1773, as his 2nd wife, EDWARD, 1st Earl LIGONIER of Clonmell, b. c.1740; d.s.p. 14 June 1782, bur. 20 June 1782 St Andrew Church, Cobham, Surrey, only son (illegitimate) of Col. Francis Augustus Ligonier (1683-1746) and Anne (Freeman) Murray; m. 2nd 2 Feb. 1788 Mayfair, London, THOMAS NOEL, 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough, b. 18 Nov. 1745 Kirkby Hall, bap. 21 Dec. 1745 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 17 Apr. 1815 Portman Square, London, bur. 28 Apr. 1815 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, only son of Edward Noel, 1st Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1715-1774, descended from Edward III) and Judith Lamb (1725-1761).

Mary, Countess Ligonier has several lines of descent from Edward III. The nine lines that are through his granddaughter Joan (née Beaufort), Countess of Westmorland, are as follows.

Edward III had a 3rd surv son
Eleanor (née Neville),
Countess of Northumberland

- see Generation A3
A1) John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340-1399) m. 3) Katherine Roet (c.1350-1403), and had
A2) Lady Joan Beaufort (1377-1440) m. twice, and had three daus A3, C3 & I3 and three sons D3, F3 & H3 (see below)
A3) Lady Eleanor Neville, by 2nd husband (1403-1472) m. 2) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455, descended from Edward III), and had
A4) Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421-1461) m. Eleanor Poynings (1428-1484, descended from Edward I), and had
A5) Lady Margaret Percy (b. c.1447) m. Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (see C6 below), and had
A6) Elizabeth Gascoigne (c.1480-1559) m. Sir George Tailboys of South Kyme (1467-1538, descended from Edward I), and had two daus A7 and B7 (see below)
A7) Elizabeth Tailboys (b. c.1497) m. Sir Christopher Willoughby of Parham Hall (d. by 1540, descended from Edward I), and had
A8) Anne Willoughby (c.1517-1586) m. Edmund Hall of Greatford (by 1519-1592, descended from Edward I), and had
A9) Rachel Hall (c.1549-1629) m. Sir Arthur Hopton of Witham Friary (c.1545-1607, descended from Edward I), and had
A10) Frances Hopton (c.1592-1642) m. 1) Rice Jones of Asthall House (d. 1615), and had
A11) Rachel Jones (c.1612-1680) m. Anthony Hungerford of Fairleigh Castle (1607-1657, descended from Edward I), and had
Anthony Henley -
see Generation A13
A12) KATHERINE HUNGERFORD, b. Bourton Place, Black Bourton, Oxfordshire, bap. 11 June 1642 St Mary Church, Black Bourton; d. by 1674; m. 12 Feb. 1663 St Mary le Strand, London, as his 2nd wife, Sir ROBERT HENLEY of The Grange, Northington, Hampshire, b. 1631; d. 15 Dec. 1692, bur. St John Church, Northington, 2nd son of Robert Henley of London (1591-1656) and his 2nd wife Anne Eldred, and had
A13) ANTHONY HENLEY of The Grange, b. 1667; d. Aug. 1711; m. 8 Feb. 1700, as her 1st husband, MARY BERTIE (see D12 below), and had
A14) ROBERT HENLEY, 1st Earl of Northington, b. c.1708; d. 14 Jan. 1772 The Grange, bur. St John Church, Northington; m. 19 Nov. 1743 St George Hanover Square, London, JANE HUBAND (see B15 below), and had
A15) Lady MARY HENLEY (1751-1814 - see details above), Countess Ligonier

B7) Anne Tailboys (b. c.1510) m. 1) Sir Edward Dymoke of Scrivelsby Court (by 1508-1567, descended from Edward I), and had
B8) Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby Court (c.1530-1580) m. Lady Bridget Fiennes de Clinton (b. c.1535, descended from Edward I), and had
B9) Margaret Dymoke (d. aft.1611) m. Sir Vincent Fulnetby of Fulnetby Hall (d. 1623, descended from Edward I), and had
Amcotts Coat of Arms
B10) Jane Fulnetby (c.1575-1628) m. Sir Richard Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (c.1564-1629), and had
B11) William Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (c.1593-1639) m. Anne Bennett (b. c.1600), and had
B12) John Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (1630-1655) m. Rhoda Hussey (1635-1659), and had
B13) Rhoda Amcotts (1653-1692) m. Sir Thomas Broughton, 2nd Baronet of Broughton (see I12 below), and had
B14) Rhoda Broughton (1680-1745) m. Sir John Huband, 2nd Baronet of Ipsley (see E11 below), and had
B15) JANE HUBAND, b. Jan. 1716 Ipsley Court, Warwickshire, bap. 3 Feb. 1716 St Peter Church, Ipsley; d. 12 Sept. 1787 Grosvenor Square, London, bur. St John Church, Northington; m. 19 Nov. 1743 St George Hanover Square, ROBERT HENLEY, 1st Earl of Worthington (see A14 above)

C3) Mary Ferrers, by 1st husband (1394-1458) m. Sir Ralph Neville of Oversley (1395-1458, descended from Edward I), and had
C4) John Neville of Oversley (c.1415-1482) m. Elizabeth Newmarch (b. 1415), and had
C5) Joan Neville (c.1434-bef.1482) m. 1) Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (c.1428-1463), and had
C6) Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (c.1450-1487) m. Lady Margaret Percy (see A5 above)

D3) Edward Neville, 3rd Lord Abergavenny, by 2nd husband (c.1417-1476) m. twice, and had a dau D4 and a son E4 (see below)
D4) Margaret Neville, by 2nd wife (c.1455-1506) m. John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (c.1447-1512, descended from Edward I), and had
D5) Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham (c.1475-1529) m. 1) Dorothy Heydon (c.1477-by 1515), and had
Sir Thomas Wyatt -
see Generation D7
D6) Elizabeth Brooke (c.1503-1560) m. Sir Thomas Wyatt of Allington Castle (c.1503-1542), and had
D7) Sir Thomas Wyatt of Allington Castle (by 1521-1554) m. Jane Haute (d. aft.1595), and had
D8) Anne Wyatt (1542-1592) m. Roger Twysden of Roydon Hall (1542-1603), and had
D9) Jane Twysden (1572-1639) m. Sir William Monyns, 1st Baronet of Waldershare (c.1570-1643), and had
D10) Sir Edward Monyns, 2nd Baronet of Waldershare (c.1600-1663) m. Elizabeth Style (d. 1703), and had
D11) Susan Monyns (1651-1697) m. Hon. Peregrine Bertie of Waldershare House (c.1634-1701, descended from Edward I), and had
D12) MARY BERTIE, b. c.1679; d. by 27 May 1720 (when will was proved); m. 1st 8 Feb. 1700, ANTHONY HENLEY of The Grange (see A13 above)

E4) George Neville, 4th Lord Abergavenny, by 1st wife (1440-1492) m. 1) Margaret Fenne (c.1444-1485), and had
E5) Sir Edward Neville of Addington Park (by1482-1538) m. Eleanor Windsor (d. 1531, descended from Ed
Huband Coat of Arms
ward I), and had
E6) Edward Neville, 7th Lord Abergavenny (c.1518-1589) m. 1) Katharine Brome (b. c.1530), and had
E7) Grissell Neville (c.1565-by 1614) m. Sir Henry Poole of Oaksey (1564-1632, descended from Edward I), and had
E8) Elizabeth Poole (c.1590-1622) m. John Huband of Ipsley Court (c.1585-1650), and had
E9) Ralph Huband of Ipsley Court (1613-1651) m. Anne Tevery (d. 1672), and had
E10) Sir John Huband, 1st Baronet of Ipsley (c.1649-1710) m. Jane Paulet (see F11 below), and had
E11) Sir John Huband, 2nd Baronet of Ipsley (c.1675-1717) m. Rhoda Broughton (see B14 above)

F3) Richard Neville, 1st Earl of Salisbury, by 2nd husband (c.1398-1460) m. Lady Alice Montagu (1406-1462, descended from Edward I), and had a dau F4 and a son G4 (see below)
F4) Lady Katherine Neville (c.1442-1504) m. 1) William Bonville, 6th Lord Harington (1442-1460, descended from Edward I), and had
F5) Cecily Bonville (1460-1529) m. 1) Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset (c.1456-1501, descended from Edward I), and had
Cecily (née Bonville),
Marchioness of Dorset
-
see Generation F5
F6) Lady Dorothy Grey (c.1485-1553) m. 1) Robert, 2nd Lord Willoughby of Broke (1472-1521), and had
F7) Elizabeth Willoughby (c.1510-by 1552) m. John Paulet, 2nd Marquess of Winchester (c.1510-1576, descended from Edward I), and had
F8) William Paulet, 3rd Marquess of Winchester (c.1532-1598) m. Agnes Howard (c.1534-1601, descended from Edward I), and had
F9) William Paulet, 4th Marquess of Winchester (c.1552-1629) m. Lady Lucy Cecil (see G9 below), and had
F10) Lord Charles Paulet of Abbotts Ann (c.1610-1655) m. Elizabeth (---), and had
F11) Jane Paulet m. 2) Sir John Huband, 1st Baronet of Ipsley (see E10 above)

G4) John Neville, Marquess of Montagu (c.1431-1471) m. Isabel Ingaldesthorpe (1441-1476, descended from Edward I), and had
G5) Lady Lucy Neville (1468-1534) m. 2) Sir Anthony Browne of Calais (1443-1506, descended from Edward I), and had
G6) Elizabeth Browne (c.1502-1565) m. Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester (c.1496-1549, descended from Edward III), and had
Dorothy (née Neville),
Countess of Exeter
-
see Generation G8
G7) Lady Lucy Somerset (1523-1583) m. John Neville, 4th Lord Latimer (see H7 below), and had
G8) Dorothy Neville (1548-1609) m. Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter (1542-1623), and had
G9) Lady Lucy Cecil (1568-1614) m. William Paulet, 4th Marquess of Winchester (see F9 above)

H3) George Neville, 1st Lord Latimer, by 2nd husband (c.1411-1469) m. Lady Elizabeth Beauchamp (c.1411-1480, descended from Edward I), and had
H4) Sir Henry Neville, Heir of Latimer (c.1435-1469) m. Joan Bourchier (c.1448-1470, descended from Edward III), and had
H5) Richard Neville, 2nd Lord Latimer (1468-1530) m. 1) Anne Stafford (d. by 1521), and had
H6) John Neville, 3rd Lord Latimer (1493-1543) m. 1) Dorothy Vere (c.1500-1526, descended from Edward I), and had
H7) John Neville, 4th Lord Latimer (1520-1577) m. Lady Lucy Somerset (see G7 above)

I3) Lady Anne Neville, by 2nd husband (c.1408-1480) m. 1) Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of 
Buckingham (1402-1460, descended from Edward III), and had
I4) Humphrey, Earl of Stafford (c.1425-1458) m. Lady Margaret Beaufort (c.1437-1474, descended from Edward III), and had
2nd Duke of Buckingham
- see Generation I5
I5) Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (1455-1483) m. Lady Katherine Woodville (c.1458-1497), and had
I6) Lady Elizabeth Stafford (c.1481-by 1532) m. Robert Radcliffe, 1st Earl of Sussex (c.1483-1542, descended from Edward I), and had
I7) Sir Humphrey Radcliffe of Elstow (1509-1566) m. Isabel Harvey (1518-1594), and had
I8) Frances Radcliffe (c.1547-by 1584) m. Henry Cheke of Elstow (c.1548-1586), and had
I9) Mary Cheke (b. c.1575) m. Thomas Spencer of Claverdon (c.1570-1630), and had
I10) Alice Spencer (c.1594-1648) m. Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote Hall (1585-1640, descended from Edward I), and had
I11) Bridget Lucy (1621-1692) m. Sir Brian Broughton, 1st Baronet of Broughton (1618-1708), and had
I12) Sir Thomas Broughton, 2nd Baronet of Broughton (c.1650-1710) m. Rhoda Amcotts (see B13 above)

I will be very busy this weekend in Victoria, helping my partner out with a family project, but hope to have the next blogpost, on the children of Rev. Thomas Noel (Countess Ligonier's illegitimate stepson), and the Edward III descent of his first wife, posted Monday or Tuesday.

Cheers,                                -----Brad

Friday, May 13, 2016

{76} Edward III Descents for Judith Noel, Lady Milbanke (1751-1822)

Judith Noel, Lady Milbanke (1751-1822)
Lord Byron's mother-in-law was a formidable woman, one of the most ambitious of the Regency period. The eldest daughter of the 1st Viscount Wentworth, Hon. Judith Noel made up for in intelligence what she lacked in beauty. At age 25, she was courted by Ralph Milbanke, a handsome, good-natured young man four years her senior, the heir to a baronetcy and several estates in Yorkshire and co. Durham. Judith brought a marriage portion of £8,000 to the Milbankes, and also brought an intolerant temperament that quickly alienated her husband's younger brother and his sister, the celebrated Whig hostess Lady Melbourne. Having suffered two miscarriages early in her marriage, as well as bouts of ill health from a blood disorder, Judith resolved that she would be childless. She focused her attentions on her husband's Parliamentary career, campaigning tirelessly for him, and on obtaining custody of her 3-year-old niece Sophia Curzon after the death of the girl's mother.

By 1791, the Noels of Kirkby Mallory were facing a succession crisis. The 2nd Viscount Wentworth, blessed with good looks and a large inheritance, had led a decadent life, taking a mistress while on the continent with whom he fathered two children. In 1780, Lady Anne Lindsay (1750-1825), a poet and the 30-year-old eldest daughter of the Earl of Balcarres, had fallen in love with the Viscount, and had even gone so far as to meet with the Viscount's one-time mistress to assess the situation. Judith Milbanke worked hard to prevent her brother's marriage, and ended up successful. She claimed it was to spare Lady Anne a life with the decadent Viscount, but others observed that it also delayed her brother, who was age 35 in 1780, from fathering a legitimate heir.
Kirkby Hall, Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire
It wasn't until 1788 that the Viscount took a wife: Mary, the dowager Countess Ligonier, a childless widow in her late 30s. She had her own health issues, and it was certainly her fortune, not the prospect of fathering an heir, that had been the main reason for the heavily debt-burdened Viscount to walk down the aisle. By 1791, the Viscount and his surviving sister Judith were resigned to their 10-year-old nephew Nathaniel Curzon as the Viscount's heir, though Judith looked with disapproval on his being raised by his father Lord Scarsdale, whom she judged to be too decadent. Only their dear old spinster aunt Mary Noel (1725-1802), who had raised them and their sisters after their mother's early death, had any hope that the succession could change. She noticed the improved health of both Judith and the Countess Ligonier in the past year, and insisted that there was still hope of fertility, despite both women having just turned 40. And, the elderly lady was proven right, for in the fall of 1791, Judith conceived. At first believing she had entered menopause, Judith was shocked and delighted to discover it was instead the long-awaited heir to the Milbankes and the Noels. There was some disappointment when Judith gave birth to a girl in the spring, but the baby was healthy, and the middle-aged mother was delighted. All of her energy would now be focused on this miraculous heiress, and Judith was a lioness when it came to her daughter, as Lord Byron would come to experience firsthand. Judith used all her considerable influence to obtain the couple's legal separation after their troubled first year of marriage.

Details of Judith, her parents, her siblings, and their children, are followed by the four lines of descent from Edward III which Judith has, all through her father the 1st Viscount Wentworth.

1st Viscount Wentworth (1715-1774)
EDWARD NOEL, 1st Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough, b. 30 Aug. 1715 Kirkby Hall, Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire, bap. 11 Sept. 1715 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 31 Oct. 1774 Kirkby Hall, bur. 8 Nov. 1774 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, son of Sir Clobery Noel, 5th Baronet of Kirkby Mallory (1694-1733, descended from Edward III - see A15 below) and Elizabeth Rowney (c.1695-1743); m. 20 July 1744 St Mary Church, Wilby, Northamptonshire, JUDITH LAMB, b. 10 Jan. 1725; d. 3 Dec. 1761 Kirkby Hall, bur. 10 Dec. 1761 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, dau. of William Lamb of Wilby (d. 1747) and Martha --- (1685-1758), and had issue, one son and three daughters.

Issue of 1st Viscount Wentworth and Judith (Lamb) Noel:

1) THOMAS NOEL, 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough, b. 18 Nov. 1745 Kirkby Hall, bap. 21 Dec. 1745 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 17 Apr. 1815 Portman Square, London, bur. 28 Apr. 1815 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; m. 2 Feb. 1788 South Audley Street, London, MARY (HENLEY), Countess Ligonier of Clonmell, b. 1753; d.s.p. 29 June 1814 Kirkby Hall, bur. All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, widow of Edward, 1st Earl Ligonier of Clonmell (1740-1782), and dau. of Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington (c.1708-1772, descended from Edward III) and Jane Huband (1716-1787, descended from Edward III); by ANNA CATERINA VAN LOO, b. c.1750 Ghent, Flanders [Belgium]; d. 11 Sept. 1781 Wootton, England, had illegitimate issue, one son and one daughter.

Issue (illegitimate) of 2nd Viscount Wentworth and Anna Caterina van Loo:

1A) ANNA CATHERINE NOEL, b. 4 Nov. 1769 Noirefontaine, Bouillon, Belgium; d. Apr. 1840 Hookwood House, Limpsfield, Surrey, bur. 25 Apr. 1840 St Peter Church, Limpsfield; m. 14 June 1790 St Marylebone, London, VINCENT HILTON BISCOE of Hookwood House, b. Bedford Row, Holborn, London, bap. 22 Jan. 1767 St Andrew Holborn; d. 26 Nov. 1846 Great Malvern Priory, Worcestershire, son of Vincent John Biscoe of Bedford Row (1721-1770) and Benigna Gottlieb Shiffner (c.1722-1796), and had issue, five sons and seven daughters.
All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory

1B) Rev. THOMAS NOEL, Rector of Kirkby Mallory 1798-1853, b. 28 Dec. 1774 England, bap. 25 Apr. 1792 St Marylebone, London; d. 22 Aug. 1853 Plymouth, Devon, bur. 29 Aug. 1853 Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth; m. 1st 7 May 1796 St Mary Church, Bucklebury, Berkshire, CATHERINE SMITH, b. Claybrooke, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, bap. 21 Aug. 1773 St Mary Church, Lutterworth; d. 11 Mar. 1832 Norris Hill, Leicestershire, dau. of Holled Smith of Normanton Turville Hall (1732-1795, descended from Edward III) and Elizabeth Grace (1738-1786), and had issue, five sons and five daughters; m. 2nd 1 Mar. 1838 Town Hall, Calais, France, HENRIETTA ELIZABETH FISHER, b. 27 July 1808 Gravesend, Kent, bap. 28 Jan. 1812 St George Church, Gravesend; d. 27 Aug. 1878 St Stephen-By-Saltish, Cornwall, bur. 30 Aug. 1878 Ford Park Cemetery, Plymouth, dau. of Thomas Fisher of Gravesend (d. 1814) and Mary (?)Milgate, and had further issue, two sons.

2) Hon. JUDITH NOEL, b. 3 Nov. 1751 Kirkby Hall, bap. 4 Nov. 1751 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 28 Jan. 1822 Kirkby Hall, bur. 5 Feb. 1822 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; m. 9 Jan. 1777 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, Sir RALPH MILBANKE [later NOEL], 6th Baronet of Halnaby, b. 28 July 1747 Chester Deanery, Chester-le-Street, co. Durham, bap. 20 Aug. 1747 St Mary & St Cuthbert Church, Chester-le-Street; d. 19 Mar. 1825 Hampstead, Middlesex, bur. 27 Mar. 1825 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, er son of Sir Ralph Milbanke, 5th Baronet of Halnaby (c.1722-1798, descended from Edward IV) and Elizabeth Hedworth (1731-1767, descended from Edward IV), and had issue, one daughter.

Issue of Hon. Judith (Noel) and Sir Ralph Milbanke, 6th Baronet:

11th Baroness Wentworth
(1792-1860)
2A) ANNE ISABELLA MILBANKE [later, in 1822, NOEL], 11th Baroness Wentworth of Nettlestead, b. 17 May 1792 Elemore Hall, Pittington, co. Durham, bap. 10 Aug. 1792 St Mary Church, Seaham, co. Durham; d. 16 May 1860 Primrose Hill, London, bur. 21 May 1860 Kensal Green Cemetery, London; m. 2 Jan. 1815 Seaham Hall, co. Durham (separated 15 Apr. 1816), GEORGE GORDON BYRON, 6th Baron Byron of Rochdale, b. 22 Jan. 1788 Marylebone, London, bap. 1 Mar. 1788 St Marylebone Parish Church; d. 19 Apr. 1824 Missolonghi, Greece, bur. 16 July 1824 St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall Torkard, Nottinghamshire, only son of Capt. John Byron of Marylebone (1757-1791, descended from Edward III) and his 2nd wife Katharine Gordon (1764-1811, descended from James IV), and had issue, one daughter.

3) Hon. ELIZABETH NOEL, b. 10 July 1755 Kirkby Hall, bap. 12 July 1755 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d.s.p. 25 Jan. 1779, bur. 31 Jan. 1779 St Botolph Church, Bradenham, Buckinghamshire; m. 19 June 1777 St Marylebone, London, as his 1st wife, Sir JAMES BLAND BURGES [later LAMB], 1st Baronet of Burghfield, b. 8 June 1752 Gibraltar; d. 13 Oct. 1824, bur. 20 Oct. 1824 St George Hanover Square, London, only son of Capt. George Burges of Edinburgh (1725-1786) and Hon. Anne Whichnor Somerville (1725-1778, descended from James II of Scotland).
Hon. Sophia (née Noel) Curzon
(1758-1782)

4) Hon. SOPHIA SUSANNA NOEL, b. 24 Mar. 1758 Kirkby Hall, bap. 12 Apr. 1758 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 28 June 1782 Brompton, London, bur. 8 July 1782 All Saints Church, Kedleston, Derbyshire;  m. 11 Aug. 1777 St Marylebone, London, NATHANIEL CURZON, 2nd Baron Scarsdale, b. 16 Sept. 1751 Westminster, London, bap. 19 Sept. 1751 St George Hanover Square; d. 27 Jan. 1837 Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire, bur. 4 Feb. 1837 All Saints Church, Kedleston, est son of Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Baron Scarsdale (1726-1804, descended from Henry IV) and Lady Caroline Colyear (1733-1812, descended from James IV), and had issue, one son and one daughter.

Issue of Hon. Sophia (Noel) and  2nd Baron Scarsdale:

4A) Hon. SOPHIA CAROLINE CURZON, b. 13 Jan. 1779 Marylebone, London, bap. 11 Feb. 1779 St Marylebone; d.s.p. 3 Feb. 1849 Coton Hill, Staffordshire, bur. 13 Feb. 1849 St Mary & St Hartulph Church, Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire; m. 5 Sept. 1800 St George Hanover Square, ROBERT SEWALLIS SHIRLEY, Viscount Tamworth, b. 9 Nov. 1778 London, bap. 18 Nov. 1778 St Andrew Holborn; d.s.p. 6 June 1824, bur. 18 June 1824 St Mary & St Hartulph Church, Breedon-on-the-Hill, only son of Robert Shirley, 7th Earl Ferrers (1756-1827, descended from Edward III) and his 1st wife Elizabeth Prentise (d. 1799).

4B) NATHANIEL CURZON, 3rd Baron Scarsdale, b. 3 Jan. 1781 Marylebone, London, bap. 15 Jan. 1781 St Marylebone; d. unm. 12 Nov. 1856 Farnah Hall, Duffield, Derbyshire, bur. 19 Nov. 1856 All Saints Church, Kedleston.

Edward III had two sons A1 and D1 (see below):
John of Gaunt - see
Generation A1
A1) John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340-1399) m. 3) Katherine Roet (c.1350-1403), and had
A2) Lady Joan Beaufort (c.1377-1440) m. twice, and had a dau A3 and a son B3 (see below)
A3) Elizabeth Ferrers, by 1st husband (1393-1434) m. John, 4th Lord Greystoke (c.1390-1436), and had
A4) Joan Greystoke (c.1409-by 1487) m. 1) John Darcy of Temple Hurst (1404-1458, descended from Edward I), and had
A5) Joan Darcy (b. c.1430) m. John Beaumont of Coleorton Hall (1428-1461), and had
A6) George Beaumont of Overton Quartermarsh (c.1453-1530) m. Joan Pauncefoot, and had
A7) William Beaumont, Heir of Coleorton Hall (c.1475-1529) m. Mary Basset (d. 1539), and had
A8) Richard Beaumont of Coleorton Hall (c.1500-1537) m. Coletta Clerke, and had
A9) Nicholas Beaumont of Coleorton Hall (c.1525-1585) m. Anne Saunders (d. 1582), and had
A10) Sir Thomas Beaumont of Stoughton Grange (c.1555-1614) m. Katherine Farnham (d. 1621), and had
A11) Frances Beaumont (1580-1654) m. Sir Wolstan Dixie of Market Bosworth Hall (c.1576-1650), and had
Dixie of Market Bosworth
Coat of Arms
A12) ELIZABETH DIXIE, b. c.1601[*1]; d. 1672, bur. All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; m. 13 Apr. 1635 St Peter Church, Market Bosworth, Leicestershire, Sir VERNEY NOEL, 1st Baronet of Kirkby Mallory, b. Longdon Hall, Solihull, Warwickshire, bap. 23 Sept. 1604 St Alphege Church, Solihull; d. 1670 (will dat. 7 Apr. 1670, will pr. 4 Mar. 1671), bur. All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, 2nd son of William Noel of Kirkby Hall (d. 1642) and Frances Fulwood (1576-1632), and had
A13) Sir WILLIAM NOEL, 2nd Baronet of Kirkby Mallory, b. c.1640; d. 13 Apr. 1675, bur. All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; m. 1st 30 Oct. 1660 St Mary Church, Hurley, Berkshire, Hon. MARGARET LOVELACE, b. Ladye Place, Hurley, bap. 18 Oct. 1642 St Mary Church, Hurley; d. 14 Apr. 1671, bur. Westminster Abbey (see B12 below), and had
Arms of the Viscounts Wentworth
[1st and 4th, Noel;
2nd, Wentworth3rd, Lovelace]
[Image from European Heraldry]
A14) Sir JOHN NOEL, 4th Baronet of Kirkby Mallory, bap. 14 Feb. 1667 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 1 July 1697 Hampstead, Middlesex, bur. 8 July 1697 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; m. 4 Aug. 1692 Winchester Cathedral, Hampshire, MARY CLOBERY, b. c.1672; bur. 14 June 1751 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, dau. of Sir John Clobery of Winchester (c.1620-1688) and Anne Cranmer (1633-1707), and had
A15) Sir CLOBERY NOEL, 5th Baronet of Kirkby Mallory, b. 28 Apr. 1694 Kirkby Hall, bap. 16 May 1694 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 30 July 1733, bur. 3 Aug. 1733 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; m. 24 Aug. 1714 St John College Chapel, Oxford, ELIZABETH ROWNEY, b. c.1695; d. 25 June 1743 Oxford, bur. 1 July 1743 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, dau. of Thomas Rowney of Oxford (1667-1727) and Elizabeth Noel (d. 1730), and had
A16) Edward Noel, 1st Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1715-1774 - see details above) m. Judith Lamb (1725-1761), and had
A17) Hon. Judith Noel, Lady Milbanke (1751-1822 - see details above), mother-in-law of Lord Byron
1st Earl of Salisbury -
see Generation B3

[*1] Elizabeth Dixie was the second child of parents who were married in 1598, and whose third child was born in 1602. Elizabeth was a party to the November 1663 marriage settlement of her son. She didn't marry until she was in her mid-30s, and her son William Noel is her only recorded child.

B3) Richard Neville, 1st Earl of Salisbury, by 2nd husband (c.1398-1460) m. Lady Alice Montagu (1406-1462, descended from Edward I), and had
B4) John Neville, Marquess Montagu (c.1431-1471) m. Isabel Ingaldesthorpe (1441-1476, descended from Edward I), and had
B5) Lady Anne Neville (c.1460-1486) m. Sir William Stonor of Stonor Park (c.1449-1494, descended from Edward I), and had
B6) Anne Stonor (c.1484-1518) m. Sir Adrian Fortescue of Stonor Park (c.1481-1539), and had
B7) Margaret Fortescue (b. 1504) m. Thomas, 1st Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (see D8 below), and had a son B8 and a dau C8 (see below)
2nd Baron Wentworth -
see Generation B8
B8) Thomas, 2nd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (1525-1584) m. 2) Anne Wentworth (d. 1571, descended from Edward I), and had
B9) Henry, 3rd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (1558-1593) m. Anne Hopton (d. 1625, descended from Edward I), and had
B10) Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Cleveland (1591-1667) m. 1) Anne Crofts (see C11 below), and had
B11) Anne, 7th Baroness Wentworth of Nettlestead (1623-1697) m. John, 2nd Baron Lovelace of Hurley (1634-1670), and had
B12) Hon. Margaret Lovelace (1642-1671) m. Sir William Noel, 2nd Baronet of Kirkby Mallory (see A13 above)

C8) Anne Wentworth (c.1523-1575) m. John Poley of Badley Hall (d. 1589), and had
C9) Susan Poley (c.1545-1604) m. Thomas Crofts of West Stow Hall (c.1540-1612, descended from Edward I), and had
C10) Sir John Crofts of Little Saxham Hall (c.1565-1628) m. Mary Shirley (d. 1649, descended from Edward I), and had
C11) Anne Crofts (c.1593-1638) m. Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Cleveland (see B10 above)

Philippa, Countess of March -
see Generation D2
D1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
D2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
D3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
D4) Lady Elizabeth Percy (c.1395-1437) m. 1) John, 7th Lord Clifford (1388-1422, descended from Edward I), and had
D5) Mary Clifford (c.1420-by1458) m. Sir Philip Wentworth of Nettlestead (1424-1464), and had
D6) Sir Henry Wentworth of Nettlestead (1448-1499) m. 1) Anne Say (c.1448-aft.1489), and had
D7) Sir Richard Wentworth of Nettlestead (by 1480-1528) m. Anne Tyrell (descended from Edward I), and had
D8) Thomas, 1st Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (1501-1551) m. Margaret Fortescue (see B7 above)

The next blogpost will look at the children of Rev. Thomas Noel, the illegitimate son of the 2nd Viscount Wentworth, as well as the Edward III descent for his first wife Catherine Smith.

Cheers,                                             -------Brad

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

{75} RD600 Addition: Henry Thomas Weld of Mt Savage, Maryland (1816-1893)

Weld of Lulworth Coat of Arms
[Azure a fesse nebule, between
three crescents ermine
]
It seems there are very few descendants of King Charles II who have immigrated to the United States. Gary Boyd Roberts includes six in his 2004 edition of Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants (RD600). They are, in alphabetical order by surname:
1) Lady Caroline Blackwood (1931-1996)
2) Benedict Swingate Calvert (1732-1788)
3) Rupert Everett (b. 1959)
4) Charles Heneage (1841-1901)
5) Jessica Mitford (1917-1996)
6) Rachel Ward (b. 1957)

I find this a little misleading, as of those six, only three (Lady Caroline Blackwood, Benedict Swingate Calvert, and Jessica Mitford) made the U.S. their permanent home. The two actors may have spent some time in the States for their careers, but Rupert Everett makes his home in London and is definitely British, while Rachel Ward is considered one of Australia's leading actresses. Charles Heneage was in the British diplomatic service, and only spent about two years, 1862-1864, in Washington, DC, before his transfer to Europe, where he spent the remainder of his career. Though he did meet American-born Agnes Joy (later Princess of Salm-Salm), his future wife, while stationed in DC, and he certainly led an interesting life, Heneage can hardly be considered an American immigrant. He does however have a third cousin, through his Petre great-grandmother, who did immigrate permanently to the U.S., and left an impact on the history of the American railroad.
Mount Savage Iron Works
[Image from Mount Savage Historical Society]
Henry Thomas Weld, born 1816 in London, was the eldest son of the seven children of a prominent Reform politician in Southampton, James Weld of Archers Lodge, who was from one of the leading Roman Catholic families in England. The Welds had estates in Oxfordshire, Hampshire, and Lancashire, in addition to the family's chief seat, Lulworth Castle in Dorset. Many members of the family chose to lead religious lives, and Henry's younger brother Francis Weld became a priest, while their sister Agnes became a Benedictine nun. Their grandfather Thomas Weld of Lulworth Castle founded Stonyhurst College in 1794. Henry Weld took after his more worldly father, who was a keen yachtsman and active on the magisterial bench once Catholics were allowed to to hold office after the passing of the Catholic Emancipation Act in 1829. Henry Weld became a civil engineer, arriving in New York at the end of 1838 as managing agent and director of the Maryland and New York Iron and Coal Company, recently established and largely capitalized by English shareholders. Weld oversaw the building of the Mount Savage Iron Works on land which the company owned at the base of Big Savage Mountain in the Allegheny Mountains, rich in iron ore. In the 1840s, Mount Savage became the largest iron works in the U.S., and the first in the nation to produce heavy rails for the construction of railroads. Production in 1845 was about 200 tons per week. In 1845 Weld purchased 12,000 acres of timber lands in Somerset County in the neighbouring state of Pennsylvania. He set up a saw mill in what was to become the settlement of Southampton Mills. He later became one of the largest coal-barge proprietors on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. By the 1860s he owned real estate valued at $10,000, personal estate valued at $8,000 and enjoyed an annual income estimated at $4,000 (My primary source for the life and achievements of Henry T. Weld, and for his father James Weld, is the excellent online article by historian Richard Preston, 'James Weld (1785-1855): a Brief Biography of a Southampton Yachtsman and Politician'). In 1862/3, Weld founded St Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Mount Savage, the only Catholic church west of Cumberland (the seat of Allegany County), and many families from neighbouring towns travelled to Mount Savage for Mass.
Harriet (née Hoffman) Weld and her father Jeremiah Hoffman

In 1843 at age 27, Henry Weld married the 30-year-old Harriet Emily Hoffman, the only child of Baltimore merchant Jeremiah Hoffman (c.1780-1844). Like her husband, Harriet had been born in London. Jeremiah Hoffman was one of the eight sons and eleven children of German-born Peter Hoffman (1742-1809), who immigrated to the U.S. in the 1760s, and established a dry goods business in Baltimore which eventually became the hugely successful mercantile company Hoffman & Sons. Jeremiah and his brother William Hoffman represented the family's interests in England, with Jeremiah taking up residence in Russel Square, in the London neighbourhood of Bloomsbury. He met and married fellow Maryland native Emily Tilghman, who had lived in Portman Square since about age 9, when her widowed mother moved with her five young children from a plantation in Queen Anne's County, Maryland to her parents in London.  Harriet's mother died in childbirth when Harriet was only a toddler, and her father never re-married. Jeremiah Hoffman moved back to Baltimore in 1825 with his 13-year-old daughter, purchasing a fine brick home there which he called Chatsworth House. Just a year after his daughter Harriet married Henry Weld, Jeremiah was shot and killed in October 1844. Henry and Harriet Weld had no children of their own, making the community of Mount Savage their primary focus. They lived in a nice estate home there for nearly 50 years, with Harriet dying in 1892, and Henry Weld the following year. His obituary describes Henry as "The Pioneer Rail Manufacturer."

Through his mother Hon. Juliana (née Petre), Henry Weld is a 7th-generation descendant of Charles II, and his line of descent could be added in with that of Charles Heneage on p. 14 of RD600, since the two share the first three generations. The Weld of Lulworth article in BLG 18th Edn. Vol. 1 (1965), pp. 712-13, gives nothing on Henry Weld and his siblings beyond their names, so full genealogical details for Henry, his parents and siblings are below, followed by the seven-generation descent from Charles II in detail.
Archers Lodge, 1851 sketch by James Weld

JAMES WELD of Archers Lodge, Southampton, b. 30 Apr. 1785 Lulworth Castle, Dorset, bap. there same day; d. 24 Feb. 1855 Weymouth, Dorset, 7th son of Thomas Weld of Lulworth Castle (1750-1810, descended from Edward III) and Mary Stanley-Massey (1752-1830, descended from Edward III); m. 5 July 1812 Portman Square, London, Hon. JULIANA ANN PETRE, b. 18 Sept. 1789 Grosvenor Square, London; d. 3 June 1862 Winchester, Hampshire, 2nd dau. of Robert Edward, 10th Baron Petre (1763-1809, descended from Charles II - see Generation 5 below) and Mary Bridget Howard (1767-1843, descended from James II of Scotland), and had issue, three sons and four daughters.

Issue of James and Hon. Juliana (Petre) Weld:

1) ANNA MARIA WELD, b. 1814 Portman Square, London; d. unm. 29 June 1851 Eaton Square, Belgravia, London.

2) HENRY THOMAS WELD of Mount Savage, Allegany County, Maryland, civil engineer, b. 31 Jan. 1816 Portman Square, London; d.s.p. 18 July 1893 Mount Savage; m. 30 May 1843 Baltimore County, Maryland, HARRIET EMILY HOFFMAN, b. 19 July 1812 Russell Square, Bloomsbury, London, bap. 17 Feb. 1813 St George Bloomsbury; d.s.p. (will dated 5 Jan., proved 17 Oct.) 1892 Maryland, bur. Old St Pauls Cemetery, Baltimore, only dau. of Jeremiah Hoffman of Chatsworth House, Baltimore (c.1780-1844) and Eliza Emily Tilghman (1790-1813, descended from Edward IV).
Henry Weld Home in Mount Savage
3) KATHERINE MARY WELD, b. 25 Aug. 1817 Britwell House, Britwell Salome, Oxfordshire; d. unm. 20 Oct. 1885 Lymington, Hampshire.

4) Rt Rev Mgr. FRANCIS JOSEPH WELD, Rector of Shrewsbury Place, Isleworth 1854-98, b. 5 Sept. 1819 South Down Cottage, Weymouth; d. unm. 26 Sept. 1898 Château Dauphin, Pontgibaud, Puy-De-Dôme, Auvergne, France.

5) AGNES WELD, Benedictine nun 1841-83, b. 30 July 1821 South Down Cottage, Weymouth; d. unm. Feb. 1883 St Mary Abbey, East Bergholt, Suffolk.

6) PHILIP GEORGE WELD, b. 16 Aug. 1828 Archers Lodge, bap. St Joseph Roman Catholic Church, Southampton; d. (drowned) 16 Apr. 1845 St Edmund's College, Ware, Hertfordshire.

6) CHARLOTTE ADELAIDE WELD, b. 23 Aug. 1830 Archers Lodge, bap. St Joseph Roman Catholic Church, Southampton; d. unm. 20 Nov. 1862 Lulworth Castle.

CHARLES II = Mary Davies (c.1651-1708), and had a dau
3rd Earl of Derwentwater -
see Generation 2
1) Lady MARY TUDOR, illegit., b. 16 Oct. 1673; d. 5 Nov. 1726 Paris, France; m. 1st 18 Aug. 1687,  EDWARD RADCLIFFE, 2nd Earl of Derwentwater, b. 9 Dec. 1655; d. 29 Apr. 1705 London, est son of Francis Radcliffe, 1st Earl of Derwentwater (1625-1696, descended from Edward III) and Katherine Fenwick (descended from Edward III), and had
2) JAMES RADCLIFFE, 3rd Earl of Derwentwater, b. 26 June 1689 Piccadilly, London; d. (executed) 24 Feb. 1716 Tower Hill, London, bur. Dalston Chapel, Northumberland;  m. 10 July 1712, ANNA MARIA WEBB, b. 1693; d. 19 Aug. 1723 Brussels, Belgium, est dau. of Sir John Webb, 3rd Baronet of Odstock (c.1670-1745, descended from Edward III) and his 1st wife Hon. Barbara Bellasis (c.1673-1740, descended from Edward III), and had
3) Lady ANNA MARIA BARBARA RADCLIFFE, b. 1716; d. 31 Mar. 1760 Ingatestone Hall, Essex, bur. 4 Apr. 1760 St Edmund & St Mary Church, Ingatestone; m. 2 May 1732 St Pauls Cathedral, London, ROBERT JAMES PETRE, 8th Baron Petre of Writtle, b. 3 June 1713; d. 2 July 1742 London, bur. 8 July 1742 St Edmund & St Mary Church, Ingatestone, est son of Robert, 7th Baron Petre (1690-1713, descended from Edward III) and Catherine Walmesley (1698-1785, descended from Edward III), and had
4) ROBERT EDWARD PETRE, 9th Baron Petre of Writtle, b. Feb. 1742; d. 2 July 1801 Westminster, London, bur. St Edmund & St Mary Church, Ingatestone; m. 1st 19 Apr. 1762 Golden Square, London, ANNE HOWARD, b. 29 Aug. 1742; d. 15 Jan. 1787 Thorndon Hall, West Thorndon, Essex, bur. 23 Jan. 1787 St Edmund & St Mary Church, Ingatestone, dau. of Philip Howard of Buckenham House (1689-1750, descended from James II of Scotland) and his 2nd wife Henrietta Blount (1708-1782, descended from Edward III), and had
10th Baron Petre -
see Generation 5
5) ROBERT EDWARD PETRE, 10th Baron Petre of Writtle, b. 2 Sept. 1763 Thorndon Hall, bap. there 3 Sept. 1763; d. 28 Mar. 1809 Thorndon Hall, bur. 6 Apr. 1809 St Edmund & St Mary Church, Ingatestone; m.  14 Feb. 1786 Grosvenor Square, London, MARY BRIDGET HOWARD, b. 29 Sept. 1767 Worksop, Nottinghamshire; d. 30 May 1843 Marylebone, London, bur. 5 June 1843 St Edmund & St Mary Church, Ingatestone, dau. of Henry Howard of Glossop (1713-1787, descended from James II of Scotland) and Juliana Molyneux (c.1745-1808, descended from Edward III), and had
6) Hon. JULIANA ANN PETRE (1789-1862 - see details above) m. JAMES WELD of Archers Lodge (1785-1855), and had
7) HENRY THOMAS WELD of Mount Savage (1816-1893 - see details above)

The next blogpost will return to the ancestry of the 11th Baroness Wentworth, wife of Lord Byron, and look at some Edward III lines to her mother Hon. Judith Noel.

Cheers,                                     -----Brad