Saturday, March 25, 2017

{113} RDUSA: Edward IV Descent for California brothers Harrington Noel Bond (1897-1945) & John Fleetwood Bond (1911-1981)

Harrington A.J. Noel Bond (1897-1945)
[Image from Find a Grave]
One of the things I'm most interested in genealogically is immigration. As an immigrant myself (from the U.S. to Canada), I'm always fascinated by the circumstances which lead an individual (or family) to make a home in a different country. When it comes to the descendants of Edward I, thousands have migrated out from England, to all corners of the globe, beginning with the colonization of the New World in the early 17th-century, and continuing down four hundred years to the present early 21st century. American genealogist Gary Boyd Roberts, of the New England Historical Genealogical Society, has compiled a collection of royal descents for governors of the American colonies, immigrants to the U.S., and notable 20th-century personalities. In the introduction to the latest (2008) edition of his The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States [RD600], Roberts writes (p. xviii), "But many nineteenth- and twentieth-century immigrants [to the U.S.] have left only a few, a few dozen, a few hundred, or a few thousand descendants - not enough for at least one to be almost certainly notable, not enough for living Americans to expect to find any of a small group of such immigrants in their ancestry, and not yet enough to have generated a sizeable body of published genealogy. Yet undoubtedly, because of their sheer quantity, many post-colonial immigrants have royal descents and my selection of them, discussed briefly above and despite much perusal of sources, is very partial." Roberts continues (p. xxvi), "Many more English origins and royal descent discoveries are likely in the near future."

As I trace lines of descent from Edward I, and in the spirit of Roberts' impressive Immigrants series, I will feature posts on Edward I descendants who have emigrated from Britain and Ireland. Hopefully, this will help to begin an accurate counting of immigrants descended from that monarch, which in turn can lead to interesting statistical analysis once a large enough sample is achieved. I will differ from Roberts's efforts in two major ways. First, my immigrant base will be more expansive: those who migrated to the United States will be included, along with those who migrated to Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the African continent. The letters RD (for 'royal descent') followed by a territorial abbreviation (RDUSA for immigrants to the U.S., RDCND for those to Canada, RDAUS for those to Australia, RDNZ for those to New Zealand, and RDAFR for those to the African continent) in the title of a post will indicate to which part of the former British Empire the Edward I descendant immigrated. Secondly, my definition of immigrant will be more restrictive than that of Roberts: the Edward I descendant has to have permanently settled in the new country (which eliminates most colonial governors from the immigrant count), or, if the Edward I descendant returned to Britain before the end of his/her life, he/she must have at least one child who remained behind in the new country as a permanent resident. Finally, I will follow the format established by Roberts regarding immigrants with more than one line of descent from Edward I: the line from the most recent monarch will be the one shown, and in the case of an immigrant with multiple lines from the same monarch, the most senior of those lines will be the one presented. Previous posts on Henry Thomas Weld (1816-1893)Agnes Maria (née von Rechberg) Risom (1921-2009) and Baroness Marie (née Howard) von Recum (1868-1954), labelled them as RD600 Additions. Under the new labelling, all three would be RDUSAs.
The Lodge, Banstead, Surrey - it was demolished in 2002
[Image from BansteadHistory.com]

Starting off the new immigrant labelling system are Harrington Noel Bond and his brother John Fleetwood Bond, who immigrated to the U.S. with their parents and three sisters in 1914. Their paternal Bond line can be directly traced back to one John Bond of Harleston, Norfolk, a mercer in the 18th-century. His son Rev. John Bond (1759-1832) attended Cambridge University, was ordained in 1785, and served from 1795 until his death as rector of Freston, Suffolk, a benefice which his elder son, Rev. John Theodore Bond (1812-1841), held after his death. When Rev. John Theodore died aged only 28, he arranged that the rectory of Freston be held in trust until his 13-year-old younger brother Alfred Bond (1827-1912) came of age, took holy orders, and assumed the clerical duties of the parish, which he went on to do in 1853. Rev. Alfred proved a reluctant clergyman: in 1878, the year his first wife died, he filed for bankruptcy, and two years later in 1880 he resigned the rectory of Freston, and gave up his career as a clergyman altogether. He married again, and retired with his second wife to a quiet life at Cold Blow Cottage near the village of Banstead, Surrey. It was in Banstead that Alfred's youngest son J.L. Fleetwood Bond met Blanche Hudson, the younger daughter of Mr. Harrington Hudson, Justice of the Peace and former Yorkshire landowner, who lived at The Lodge, originally a farmhouse but which had been expanded to include stables, outbuildings, cottage and gardens. Blanche had lost her mother tragically when she was only six years old, and moved into The Lodge with her father and elder sister shortly afterwards. Nine months after her father's 1896 death, Blanche wed Fleetwood Bond, and they moved some months later into West Parley House, near Wimborne in Dorset, where all but the eldest of their five children were born. Despite the bankruptcy of his father, there seemed to be enough money for Fleetwood Bond to not have to take up an occupation, and the first decade of the Bonds' married life saw them participating in lawn tennis tournaments across Britain, as both were avid players.
Arcadia, De Soto County, Florida - vintage postcard
The reason behind Fleetwood and Blanche Bond's migration to the United States is not remembered today among the couple's descendants. In April 1912, ten months after the birth of their youngest son John, the Bonds immigrated to Tilbury, Ontario, Canada, followed two years later by a move to Arcadia, the seat of De Soto County in central Florida, where Fleetwood's elder brother Gerald Gordon Bond (1862-1936) owned a large farm. Fleetwood, still living on his own means, is listed with his five children in Arcadia on the same page of the 1920 US Census as his brother Gerald and his family. Not long afterwards, Fleetwood died, and the widowed Blanche Bond travelled back and forth frequently between Britain and the U.S. She settled in Portrush in Northern Ireland, where she died in 1946. Blanche's middle daughter Olive married artist George Nash and returned to the UK, where she died in 1988 at age 86, the last surviving child of immigrants Fleetwood and Blanche Bond. The couple's youngest daughter Myrtle Bond married a man from Nova Scotia, but their eldest daughter Violet married an American and remained in the States, as did their two sons. In 1923, Harrington Bond, who worked on his uncle Gerald's Arcadia farm, married Alta Beebe, an Illinois farmer's daughter. The marriage produced one daughter, but ended in divorce. The daughter Hazel Bond, spent much time as a child visiting relatives in Britain, and eventually settled there, marrying an officer in the Royal Navy.
Blanche (née Hudson) Bond,
with youngest child John c.1913
[Image courtesy of
Nanette Walls]
Harrington met his second wife Willie Lee Latture, a divorcee with a young daughter of her own, through his sister and brother-in-law Violet and Coleman Walls, as Coleman's younger brother Lawton Walls had married Willie Lee's elder sister Bertha. Harrington and Willie Lee moved to Los Angeles shortly after their marriage, where Harrington took a job as a salesman at a shoe store. He died there on his 48th birthday. His younger brother John Bond also moved out West, to the Los Angeles suburb of Whittier, where he also worked as a salesman. He married teacher Virginia Poe, the daughter of a St Louis physician, in 1938, and had two children. Tragically, on a visit to John's sister Myrtle (née Bond) Davis in Canada, Virginia went swimming with Myrtle's teenaged daughter Shirley Davis, and the ladies contracted polio, which proved fatal to both. Though John Bond went on to re-marry and have several other relationships, none of them were lasting, or came close to the happiness he had with Virginia. John died at age 70 in 1981 in the town of Carpenteria on the California coast.

BLANCHE HUDSON, b. 2 Aug. 1872 Scarborough, Yorkshire, bap. 31 Oct. 1872 St Mary Church, Scarborough; d. 22 July 1946 Portrush, co. Antrim, Ireland, yr dau. of Harrington Hudson of The Lodge, Banstead, Surrey (1835-1896, descended from Edward IV - see Generation 13 below) and (Belle) Blanche Clough (1844-1879, descended from Edward III); m. 3 Nov. 1896 St James Church, Westminster, (JOHN LINCOLN) FLEETWOOD BOND of West Parley House, Dorset, and of Arcadia, DeSoto County, Florida, b. 15 Dec. 1869 Belgravia, London, bap. 26 Apr. 1874 St Peter Church, Freston, Suffolk; d. by 1922[*1], yst. son of Rev. Alfred Bond, Rector of Freston 1853-80 (1827-1912) and his 1st wife Georgiana Eliza Tharp (1829-1878), and had issue, two sons and three daughters.

Issue of Blanche (Hudson) and J.L. Fleetwood Bond:

1) HARRINGTON (ALFRED JAMES) NOEL BOND of Los Angeles, California, shoe salesman, b. 14 Aug. 1897 Banstead, Surrey; d. 14 Aug. 1945 Los Angeles County General Hospital, bur. Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, Los Angeles County; m. 1st 30 May 1923 Arcadia, DeSoto County, Florida (div.), as her 1st husband, ALTA MAY BEEBE, b. 28 Nov. 1905 Banner, Fulton County, Illinois; d. 10 Sept. 1980 Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, bur. Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, dau. of Henry Clay Beebe of Banner, farmer (1851-1919) and Clara Roskamp (1863-1937),
Willie Lee (née Latimer) Bond
(1911-1954)
 and had issue, one daughter; m. 2nd 5 Aug. 1937 White County, Arkansas, WILLIE LEE (LATIMER) LATTURE, b. 19 Dec. 1911 Searcy, White County; d. 28 Feb. 1954 Los Angeles County, bur. Rose Hills Memorial Park, formerly wife of Ralph Oneal Latture of Searcy, farmer (1906-1982), and dau. of Rufus Monroe Latimer of Searcy (1885-1972) and Tide Frances Overstreet (1889-1967).

Issue of Harrington and Alta May (Beebe) Bond:

1A) HAZEL ELIZABETH BOND, b. 14 Nov. 1924 Arcadia, De Soto County, Florida; d. 5 Nov. 2005 Surrey, UK; m. 9 Nov. 1949, Lt-Cdr. BRIAN STEWART LITTLEDALE of Guildford, Surrey, Lieutenant-Commander Royal Navy 1953, b. 17 Jan. 1926 Malta; d. 21 Apr. 2006 Surrey, yr. son of Bernard John Littledale of Shanghai, China (1891-1929) and Anne Gillies Kennedy (1891-1974), and had issue, one daughter[*2].

2) VIOLET BLANCHE ETHNE BOND, b. 11 Sept. 1898 West Parley House, Dorset, bap. 26 Oct. 1898 All Saints Church, West Parley; d. 24 May 1965 Okanogan County, Washington, bur. Okanogan City Cemetery; m. 10 Apr. 1920 DeSoto County, Florida, COLEMAN RICHARD WALLS Okanogan County Auditor, b. 14 Nov. 1897 Sidon, White County, Arkansas; d. Nov. 1977, bur. Okanogan City Cemetery, son of Willis Jeremiah Walls of Sidon, farmer (1861-1909) and Susan Elizabeth Sutton (1873-1950), and had issue, one son and one daughter.

3) OLIVE MARION BOND, b. 21 Mar. 1902 West Parley House, bap. 29 Apr. 1902 All Saints Church, West Parley; d. 5 Nov. 1988 Tigharra House, Pewsey, Wiltshire; m. GEORGE NASH, artist.
John Fleetwood Bond (1911-1981) and Virginia (née Poe)
Bond 
(1914-1948) [Photo courtesy of Bill Woodard]

4) MYRTLE FRANCES BOND, bap. 28 Nov. 1905 All Saints Church, West Parley; d. unknown; m. J.B. Davis of Armdale, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and had issue, one daughter (Shirley Blanche Davis, b. 1929; d. unm. (of polio) 1948).

5) JOHN FLEETWOOD BOND of Whittier, Los Angeles County, California, salesman, b. 27 June 1911 West Parley House, bap. 8 Aug. 1911 All Saints Church, West Parley; d. 29 Dec. 1981 Santa Barbara County, bur. Goleta Cemetery, Santa Barbara County; m. 1st 5 Dec. 1938 Santa Ana, Orange County, California, (ESTHER) VIRGINIA POE, teacher, b. 27 July 1914 Stoddard County, Missouri; d. (of polio) 20 Oct. 1948 Los Angeles County, bur. Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier, dau. of Dr. Chester Arthur Poe of St Louis, physician (1887-1945) and his 1st wife Launa May Bess (1890-1915), and had issue, one son and one daughter (with five grandchildren); m. 2nd 3 Aug. 1957 Clark County, Nevada (divorce), RUTH BRYCE CHARPIA, b. 12 May 1917 Palatka, Putnam County, Florida; d. 19 Oct. 1988 Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina, dau. of Victor Eugene Charpia (1890-1923) and Leona Kirchhain (1893-1983).
Fleetwood Bond and his five children in Arcadia in the 1920 U.S. Census
[*1] Fleetwood Bond appeared in Arcadia in the 1920 U.S. Census with his five children, but not his wife. Blanche Bond is described as a widow on the passenger list when she sailed from Southampton on the S.S. Majestic on 18 Oct. 1922.
Blanche Bond a widow in a 1922 passenger list

[*2] In 1951, on the death of her childless paternal great-aunt Evelyn (Hudson) (Powis) Radcliffe, Hazel (Bond) Littledale became the senior representative of Lady Anne (née Townshend) Hudson, and the Hudsons of Bessingby Hall. Since Hazel's death in 2005, her daughter Susan née Littledale (b. 1953) holds that distinction.
Edward IV

As a native of Los Angeles, I'm delighted to be able to trace a line of descent from Edward IV to residents of my hometown. Following is how you get from a king of England to salesmen brothers, in fifteen generations. The first six generations of this descent appear on p. 45 of RD600 (2008 edition).

Edward IV = (probably) Margaret Fitzlewis, Dame Lucy (1440-1466, descended from Edward I), and had a dau:
1) Margaret Plantagenet, illegit. (b. c.1462) m. Sir Thomas Lumley, Heir of Lumley Castle (c.1462-1503, descended from Edward III), and had
2) Richard, 4th Lord Lumley (by 1478-1510) m. Anne Conyers (1469-1530, descended from Edward III), and had
3) Anthony Lumley (d. bef.1587) m. --- Grey, and had
Lumley coat of arms
4) ROGER LUMLEY of Durham, b. c.1550; d. Great North Gate, Durham, bur. 30 Mar. 1606 St Mary-le-Bow Durham; m. 28 Sept. 1578 St Oswald Church, Durham, ANNE KYRKEMAN, d. aft.1616, and had
5) RICHARD, 1st Viscount LUMLEY of Waterford, bap. 7 Apr. 1589 St Mary & St Cuthbert Church, Chester-le-Street; d. by 12 Mar. 1663 (when will was proved), bur. St Dunstan Church, Cheam, Surrey; m. 1st by 1617, FRANCES (SHELLEY) HOLLAND, bap. 21 Nov. 1592 Warminghurst, Sussex; bur. 10 Mar. 1627 St John the Baptist Church, Westbourne, Sussex, widow of William Holland of Steyning (1590-1615), and dau. of Henry Shelley of Warminghurst (1554-1623, descended from Edward I) and his 2nd wife Barbara Cromer (c.1562-1612, descended from Edward I), and had
6) Hon. JULIA LUMLEY, bap. 12 Aug. 1624 St John the Baptist Church, Westbourne; d. 21 May 1691, bur. St Peter Church, Racton, Sussex; m. 2nd 3 Nov. 1666, as his 2nd wife, Sir CHRISTOPHER CONYERS, 2nd Baronet of Horden, bap. 28 Mar. 1621 St Mary Church, Easington; bur. there 12 Oct. 1693, son of Sir John Conyers, 1st Baronet of Horden (c.1587-1664, descended from Edward IV) and Frances Groves (c.1590-1636), and had
Julia (née Conyers) Blackett
- see Generation 7
7) JULIA CONYERS, bap. 19 May 1668 St Mary & St Cuthbert Church, Chester-le-Street; d. 16 Aug. 1722, bur. 21 Aug. 1722 St John Church, Hampstead, Middlesex; m. 1st 27 Jan. 1685 St Nicholas Church, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland, Sir WILLIAM BLACKETT, 1st Baronet of Newcastle-on-Tyne, b. 5 Apr. 1657 Newcastle, bap. 9 Apr. 1657 St Nicholas Church, Newcastle; d. 2 Dec. 1705 London, bur. 29 Dec. 1705 St Nicholas Church, Newcastle, son of Sir William Blackett, 1st Baronet of Newcastle-on-Tyne (1621-1680) and Elizabeth Kirkley (d. 1674), and had
8) JULIA BLACKETT, b. 18 May 1686 Newcastle-on-Tyne, bap. 25 May 1686 St Andrew Church, Newcastle-on-Tyne; d. 13 Sept. 1736 Calverley Hall, Yorkshire, bur. 19 Sept. 1736 St Wilfred Church, Calverley; m. 17 Jan. 1707 St Andrew Church, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Sir WALTER CALVERLEY, 1st Baronet of Calverley, bap. 16 Jan. 1670 St Wilfred Church, Calverley; d. 15 Oct. 1749, bur. St Wilfred Church, Calverley, son of Walter Calverley of Calverley Hall (1629-1691, descended from Edward III) and Frances Thompson (1639-1721, descended from Edward I), and had
Julia (née Calverley) Trevelyan
- see Generation 9
9) JULIA CALVERLEY, b. 20 May 1714 Calverley Hall, bap. 17 June 1714 All Saints Church, Otley, Yorkshire; d. 28 Dec. 1787; m. 29 Jan. 1733 St Oswald Church, Guiseley, Yorkshire, Sir GEORGE TREVELYAN, 3rd Baronet of Nettlecombe, bap. 18 Nov. 1707 St Mary Church, Nettlecombe, Somersetshire; d. 11 Sept. 1768 Nettlecombe Court, bur. 20 Sept. 1768 St Mary Church, Nettlecombe, son of Sir John Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet of Nettlecombe (1670-1755, descended from Edward III) and Susanna Warren (d. 1718), and had
10) SUSANNA TREVELYAN, b. Leyhill, Payhembury, Devon, bap. 19 Nov. 1736 St Mary Church, Payhembury; bur. 23 Apr. 1780 St Crux Church, York, Yorkshire; m. 5 Feb. 1764 St Crux Church, York, JOHN HUDSON of Bessingby Hall, bap. 28 June 1727 St Mary Church, Bridlington, Yorkshire; d. Oct. 1772, bur. St Magnus Church, Bessingby, son of Benjamin Hudson of Bridlington, merchant (d. 1761) and Elizabeth Wilson (d. 1767, descended from Edward I), and had
11) Capt. HARRINGTON HUDSON of Bessingby Hall, M.P. Helton 1818-26, b. 11 Apr. 1772 Bessingby Hall, bap. 12 Apr. 1772 St Magnus Church, Bessingby; d. there 29 Nov. 1826, bur. there 7 Dec. 1826; m. 26 Oct. 1795 St Mary Church, East Raynham, Norfolk, Lady ANNE TOWNSHEND, b. 1 Feb. 1775 Marylebone, London, bap. 10 Mar. 1775 St Marylebone Parish Church; d. there 2 Apr. 1818, est dau. of George, 1st Marquess Townshend (1724-1807, descended from Edward III) and his 2nd wife Anne Montgomery (1754-1819), and had
Hudson of Bessingby coat of arms
12) HARRINGTON GEORGE FREDERICK HUDSON of Bessingby Hall, b. Raynham Hall, Norfolk, bap. 6 Mar. 1798 St Mary Church, East Raynham; d. 6 Nov. 1848 Bessingby Hall; m. 24 July 1834 All Saints Church, Bishop Burton, Yorkshire, as her 1st husband, CHARLOTTE WATT, bap. 30 Dec. 1814 All Saints Church, Bishop Burton; d. 30 Dec. 1891 Ashton Hall, Ashton-cum-Stoddy, Lancashire, 3rd dau. of Richard Watt of Bishop Burton Hall (1786-1855) and Hannah Burn (1789-1828), and had
13) HARRINGTON HUDSON of The Lodge, Banstead, Surrey, b. 7 Oct. 1835 Bessingby Hall, bap. 13 Oct. 1835 St Magnus Church, Bessingby; d. 9 Feb. 1896 The Lodge, Banstead; m. 11 Jan. 1865 St Michael-le-Belfry, York, (BELLE) BLANCHE CLOUGH, bap. 4 July 1844 St Michael-le-Belfry, York; d. (suicide) 6 Mar. 1879 St Pancras Railway Station, London, dau. of John Clough of Clifton House (1803-1865, descended from Edward III) and Rosina Cumberland (1811-1869, descended from Edward I), and had
14) BLANCHE HUDSON (1872-1946-see details above) m. Fleetwood Bond, and had
15A) HARRINGTON ALFRED JAMES NOEL BOND (1897-1945-see details above)
15B) JOHN FLEETWOOD BOND (1911-1981-see details above)

The next blogpost will focus on a father and son who are talented and successful artists, genuine cowboys, and descendants of Edward IV.

Cheers,                                ----Brad

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

{112} Some Edward III Descents for Eliza (née Broughton) Clough (1773-1856)

Clough of Newbald coat of arms
[Sable a fesse, humettée, ermine between
three leopards' faces argent
]
1879 was a devastating year for William Clough, partner in the private banking house of Swann, Clough & Co. on Coney Street, in the city of York. On Monday March 4th, his younger sister Blanche Hudson appeared at his home Clifton House, in a suburb outside the ancient city walls, and conveyed to him that she was in fear of her life from her husband and had consulted a London attorney about a divorce. She ignored his advice to return to her home in Scarborough and forget the whole quarrel with her husband, and killed herself three days later in St Pancras Railway Station in London. The suicide, and the inquest which followed it, with William Clough as a key witness, made the newspapers all throughout Britain. Weeks later, on May 15th, notice appeared in the newspapers that the first meeting for creditors of Swann, Clough & Co. would be on June 5th. The century-old bank had failed.

Tragedy was not new to William. In 1863 at age 29, he had married Georgiana Hulton, the 20-year-old daughter of a Lancashire landed gentryman, and niece of a Yorkshire baronet. Eight months later, she died at the Clough family's East Riding manor Newbald Hall, giving birth to a son who also died at birth. The match had been for love as much, if not more, than it had been for prestige, and a grieving William had a beautiful monument for his young wife placed in the Newbald parish church where she and their child were buried. Nine months later in January 1865 (the day after his sister Blanche married Harrington Hudson), William's father John Clough died, and the 30-year-old widower succeeded as a senior partner at Swann, Clough & Co. The bank's failure in 1879 ended not only four generations of father-son Clough bankers, but also the family's (relatively brief) status as landed gentry: Clifton House, Newbald Hall, and all of the rest of William's holdings were sold off to reimburse the bank's many creditors.
Coney Street, York
William himself retreated to the coastal town of Scarborough (yes, the same town that his sister Blanche had fled from, in fear of her life from her husband), where he died in 1890 at age 64. The 1865 funeral of William's father John Clough had been a very public occasion, with a full procession of hearse and four mourning coaches from Clifton House to York Cemetery. It was attended by a M.P., local administrators, landowners, tradesmen from York, and tenants from Newbald, and was covered by a respectful Yorkshire newspaper: "The late Mr. Clough was highly esteemed for his straightforward integrity of character and for his strict impartiality as a magistrate. As a landed proprietor, too, he had gained the warm respect of his tenantry by the liberal spirit he evinced towards them on all occasions" ['Funeral of John Clough', Yorkshire Gazette, January 21, 1865]. No newspaper reported the death of William Clough save for London's Morning Press, which simply printed the day and place of the death. The silence of the Yorkshire press reinforces the notion that, for all intents and purposes, William had died when his bank failed. There is no entry for William in the National Probate Calendar, which means that he had left no personal estate to be disposed - a sad end to a once proud Yorkshire banking dynasty.
St Nicholas Church, North Newbald, Yorkshire

A complete genealogical account of the descendants of John William Clough and his wife Eliza née Broughton hasn't yet come to light. The 'Clough of Clifton House and Newbald Hall' article in the late 19th-century editions of Burke's Landed Gentry only lists the children of John and Rosina (née Cumberland) Clough, and is lacking in detail. The most thorough published account of the Cloughs is that of genealogist Joseph Foster, who traced an Edward I line for banker William Clough on pp. 8-10 of his The Royal Lineage of Our Noble and Gentle Families (1884)[*1]. In his 1907 Exeter volume, Ruvigny mentioned the marriage of Eliza Broughton to John William Clough but didn't trace their descendants, except (inadvertently) for the seven children of their eldest daughter Eliza (née Clough), who married her maternal first cousin Thomas Langford Brooke of Mere Hall.[*2] The papers of banker William Clough's brother and heir Rev. John Clough (1835-1920) have been archived at the Bodleian Library, and the 2008 catalogue by Benjamin Arnold has much useful information on the fifteen children of Rev. Clough, whose descendants can be found today in England, Scotland, Africa and New Zealand. I hope to have a full account of Rev. Clough's children and grandchildren in a future blogpost. In the meantime, a full account of the children of Eliza née Broughton, and the children of her son John Clough, is given below, followed by some of the Edward III lines behind Eliza.

[*1] The Edward I descent for Rosina (née Cumberland) Clough presented by Foster in his 1884 book is incorrect. The line fails at the 4th generation: Philip le Despenser was in actuality the brother-in-law of Edward I's granddaughter Lady Eleanor Despenser, not her son as Foster has it. The line Foster presents does not intersect with the Edward I bloodline until the 16th generation, when Elizabeth St John marries his descendant Sir John Bernard, 2nd Baronet of Huntingdon.
Ruvigny's account of Eliza (Broughton) Clough on p. 227 of the Exeter volume
[*2] Ruvigny overlooked the fact that Thomas Langford Brooke and his wife Eliza Clough were first cousins. On p. 226 of the Exeter volume, he correctly has Brooke's wife as "Eliza, da. of John William Clough of Oxton Hall, co. York", but on the following page has the husband of Eliza Broughton as "William Clough of Oxted Hall, co. Yorks," seemingly unaware that he was identifying the same man.

ELIZA(BETH) BROUGHTON, b. 25 Sept. 1773 Bercher, Vaud, Switzerland, bap. 4 Sept. 1774 St Peter Church, Broughton; d. 6 Feb. 1856 Torquay, Devon, bur. 12 Feb. 1856 St Saviour Churchyard, Tormohun, Devon, dau. of Sir Thomas Broughton, 6th Baronet of Broughton (1745-1813 - see Generation A15 below) and his 1st wife Mary Wicker (1748-1785); m. 28 May 1795 St Marylebone Parish Church, London, JOHN WILLIAM CLOUGH of Oxton Hall, Yorkshire, banker, bap. 14 May 1773 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York; d. 15 Oct. 1842 Newbald Hall, Yorkshire, bur. 21 Oct. 1842 St Nicholas Church, North Newbald, son of John Clough of York, banker (1731-1789) and Rebecca Costabadie (1731-1802), and had issue, two sons and four daughters.

Issue of Eliza (Broughton) and John William Clough:

1) JOHN CLOUGH, b. 21 Feb. 1796 Wath, Yorkshire, bap. 22 Feb. 1796 St Mary Church, Wath; d. in infancy 19 Jan. 1797 Wath, bur. there 21 Jan. 1797.

Langford Brooke of Mere coat of arms
2) ELIZA CLOUGH, b. 14 July 1797 Wath, bap. 16 July 1797 St Mary Church, Wath; d. 6 Apr. 1877 Devonshire House, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, bur. 11 Apr. 1877 St Mary Church, Charlton Kings, Gloucestershire; m. 3 June 1817 St Marylebone Parish Church, London, her first cousin, THOMAS LANGFORD BROOKE of Mere Hall, Knutsford, Cheshire, b. 3 Sept. 1794 Mere Hall, bap. 21 Dec. 1794 St Mary Church, Rostherne, Cheshire; d. 24 Jan. 1848 Mere Hall, bur. 1 Feb. 1848 St Mary Church, Rostherne, 2nd son of Thomas Langford Brooke of Mere Hall (1769-1815, descended from Edward I) and Maria Broughton (1769-1841, descended from Edward III), and had issue, four sons and four daughters.

3) HENRIETTA CLOUGH, b. 1 Nov. 1798 Bramham, Yorkshire, bap. 18 Mar. 1799 All Saints Church, Bramham; d.s.p. 10 Dec. 1875 Hill Cottage, Axminster, Devon; m. 26 Nov. 1850 St Nicholas Church, North Newbald, Yorkshire, as his 2nd wife, Lt. THOMAS MALLOCK of Axminster, Lieutenant Royal Navy 1830, b. 11 June 1799 Axminster; d. there 30 Apr. 1869, 2nd son of Rawlin Mallock of Axminster, solicitor (c.1772-1854) and his 1st wife Charlotte Sobey.

All Saints Church, Bramham, Yorkshire
4) MARIA CLOUGH, b. 18 Apr. 1800 Bramham, bap. 24 Apr. 1800 All Saints Church, Bramham; d. unm. 11 Mar. 1844 Torquay, Devon, bur. 16 Mar. 1844 St Saviour Church, Tormohun, Devon.

5) HARRIOT EMMA CLOUGH, b. 21 Jan. 1802 Bramham, bap. 30 Jan. 1802 All Saints Church, Bramham; d.s.p. 1 Mar. 1892 Torquay, Devon, bur. 5 Mar. 1892 Torquay Cemetery; m. 12 Sept. 1844 St George & St Mary Church, Cockington, Devon, Lt. JOHN HOLBERTON of Torr House, Newton Ferrers, Devon, Lieutenant Royal Navy 1816, b. Torr House, bap. 26 May 1797 Holy Cross Church, Newton Ferrers; d.s.p. 6 Nov. 1858 Torr House, bur. 12 Nov. 1858 Holy Cross Church, Newton Ferrers, son of Robert Holberton of Torr House (1755-1812) and Anne Square (1771-1824).

6) JOHN CLOUGH of Clifton House, York, banker, b. 28 Jan. 1803 Bramham, bap. 8 Feb. 1803 All Saints Church, Bramham; d. 12 Jan. 1865 Clifton House, bur. 17 Jan. 1865 York Cemetery; m. 23 July 1833 Cheltenham Minster, Gloucestershire, ROSINA CUMBERLAND, b. 16 Dec. 1811 Norwich, Norfolk, bap. 28 Jan. 1812 St John de Sepulchre Church, Norwich; d. 7 July 1869 Marylebone, London, bur. 12 July 1869 Kensal Green Cemetery, London, yst dau. of RAdm. William Cumberland of Cheltenham (1765-1832, descended from Edward I) and Elizabeth Pym Burt (1779-1840), and had issue, four sons and four daughters.

Issue of John and Rosina (Cumberland) Clough:
Georgiana Maria (née Hulton) Clough memorial tablet in
St Mary Church, Deane, Lancashire

6A) WILLIAM CLOUGH of Clifton House, banker, b. 23 Aug. 1834 Acomb, York, bap. 18 Sept. 1834 St Stephen Church, Acomb; d.s.p.s. 4 Oct. 1890 Scarborough, Yorkshire; m. 5 Aug. 1863 St Mary Church, Deane, Lancashire, GEORGIANA MARIA HULTON, bap. 29 Jan. 1843 St Mary Church, Deane; d. (in childbirth) 6 Apr. 1864 Newbald Hall, Yorkshire, bur. 11 Apr. 1864 St Nicholas Church, North Newbald, yr dau. of William Ford Hulton of Hulton Park (1811-1879, descended from Edward III) and Georgiana Lister Kaye (1815-1877, descended from Henry VII), and had issue, one son (d. at birth).

6B) Rev. JOHN CLOUGH, Rector of Wilford, Nottinghamshire 1889-1920, b. 29 Nov. 1835 Acomb, York, bap. 24 Dec. 1835 St Stephen Church, Acomb; d. 3 Mar. 1920 Wilford; m. 23 Mar. 1867 Madras, India, AMY LOUISA MARGARET KENNY, b. 30 Sept. 1851 Secunderabad, Madras; d. 9 July 1934 Ferncroft, Holmwood, Surrey, bur. 11 July 1934 St Mary Magdalene Churchyard, Holmwood, 3rd dau. of Col. Thomas Geils Edward Gammell Kenny of Madras (1804-1867) and Charlotte Wilson (c.1814-1888), and had issue, six sons and nine daughters.

Rev. Henry Thomas Barry
(1848-1918)
6C) ROSE MARIA CLOUGH, b. 22 Mar. 1837 Acomb, York, bap. 9 Apr. 1837 St Stephen Church, Acomb; d. 19 Nov. 1914 North Kensington, London, bur. 23 Nov. 1914 St John the Baptist Churchyard, Blisworth, Northamptonshire; m. 1st 30 Sept. 1862 St Michael-le-Belfry, York, Lt. FRANCIS STIRLING BROWN HOLT of Birchwood, South Island, New Zealand, Lieutenant Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, b. 1 July 1839 Stoke Damerel, Devon, bap. 11 Nov. 1839 St Andrew with St Luke Church, Stoke Damerel; d. at sea 25 June 1872, son of RAdm. William Holt of Westminster (c.1790-1859) and Frances Vesey (c.1801-1839, descended from Edward III), and had issue, four daughters; m. 2nd 29 Aug. 1876 St Nicholas Church, North Newbald, Yorkshire, Rev. HENRY THOMAS BARRY, Rector of Blisworth 1884-1904, bap. 23 Jan. 1848 St John the Baptist Church, Blisworth; d. 1 Mar. 1918 North Kensington, London, bur. 5 Mar. 1918 St John the Baptist Churchyard, Blisworth, son of Rev. William Barry, Rector of Blisworth 1839-84 (1803-1884) and Frances Amelia Finniss (1809-1884), and had further issue, one son and one daughter.

6D) EDMUND CLOUGH, Ensign 57th Bengal Native Infantry, b. 9 Aug. 1839 Clifton House, York, bap. 7 Sept. 1839 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York; d. unm. (killed during Indian Mutiny) 10 May 1857 Meerut, Bengal, India.

6E) EMMA CLOUGH, bap. 28 Oct. 1840 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York; d. 15 Jan. 1885 Calcutta, Bengal, India, bur. there 16 Jan. 1885; m. 27 Jan. 1866 Calcutta, as his 1st wife, WILLIAM GORDON LYNCH COTTON of Calcutta, civil engineer, b. 9 Aug. 1838 Brodie House, Dyke, Morayshire, Scotland; d. 23 Jan. 1911, bur. 26 Jan. 1911 South Ealing Cemetery, Middlesex, 2nd son of Lt-Col. Hugh Calveley Cotton of Reading (1798-1881, descended from Henry IV) and Louisa Brodie (1801-1862, descended from James V), and had issue, three sons and one daughter.

Blanche (née Clough) Hudson
(1844-1879)
6F) (BELLE) BLANCHE CLOUGH, b. 9 June 1844 Clifton House, York, bap. 4 July 1844 St Michael-le-Belfry, York; d. (suicide) 6 Mar. 1879 St Pancras Railway Station, London; m. 11 Jan. 1865 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York, HARRINGTON HUDSON of Bessingby Hall, Yorkshire, b. there 7 Oct. 1835, bap. 13 Oct. 1835 St Magnus Church, Bessingby; d. 9 Feb. 1896 The Lodge, Banstead, Surrey, bur. 13 Feb. 1896 All Saints Churchyard, Banstead, est son of Harrington George Frederick Hudson of Bessingby Hall (1798-1848, descended from Edward IV) and Charlotte Watt (1814-1891), and had issue, two sons and two daughters.

6G) FREDERICK CLOUGH of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, gold prospector, b. 30 Oct. 1846 Clifton House, York, bap. 23 Nov. 1846 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York; d. (presumably unmarried) 9 Dec. 1916 Ballarat, bur. Ballarat New Cemetery.

6H) FLORENCE MARY CLOUGH, bap. 8 Aug. 1850 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York; d. 4 Nov. 1911 Woking, Surrey, bur. 8 Nov. 1911 St Mary Churchyard, Horsell, Surrey; m. 13 Apr. 1871 St George Hanover Square, London, Lt-Col. HARRIE ARCHBOLD REID of Horsell, Lieutenant-Colonel 7th Hussars, b. 16 Dec. 1845 St Leonard-on-Sea, Sussex; d. 20 May 1903 Horsell, bur. 25 May 1903 St Mary Churchyard, Horsell, only son of John Reid of Upper Tooting, Surrey, civil engineer (1812-1847) and Harriet Archbold (1814-1846), and had issue, one son.
Guy Evelyn Harrie Reid
(1887-1915)

Issue of Florence Mary (Clough) and Lt-Col. Harrie Archbold Reid:

6H1) Lt. GUY EVELYN HARRIE REID of Nairobi, farmer, Lieutenant King's African Rifles, b. 28 June 1887 Chelsea, London, bap. 21 July 1887 St Saviour Church, Chelsea; d. unm. (killed in action) 9 Mar. 1915 Tanzania, Africa, bur. Dar Es Salaam War Cemetery, Tanzania.

Eliza (née Broughton) Clough has several lines of descent from Edward III. Below are the seven of them which are through his sons Thomas of Woodstock and Lionel of Antwerp, in addition to the one thru Anne Plantagenet, Duchess of Exeter, given in the previous blogpost.


Edward III had two sons A1 & D1 (see below)
1st Duke Buckingham -
see Generation A3
A1) Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester (1355-1397) m. Lady Eleanor de Bohun (1366-1399, descended from Edward I), and had
A2) Anne Plantagenet, Countess of Buckingham (1383-1438) m. three times, and had two sons A3 and C3 (see below)
A3) Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of 
Buckingham, by 2nd husband (1402-1460) m. Lady Anne Neville (c.1408-1480, descended from Edward III), and had
A4) Humphrey, Earl of Stafford (c.1425-1458) m. Lady Margaret Beaufort (c.1437-1474, descended from Edward III), and had
A5) Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (1455-1483) m. Lady Katherine Woodville (c.1458-1497), and had a dau A6 and a son B6 (see below)
A6) Lady Elizabeth Stafford (c.1481-by 1532) m. Robert Radcliffe, 1st Earl of Sussex (c.1483-1542, descended from Edward I), and had
A7) Sir Humphrey Radcliffe of Elstow (1509-1566) m. Isabel Harvey (1518-1594), and had
A8) Frances Radcliffe (c.1547-by 1584) m. Henry Cheke of Elstow (c.1548-1586), and had
Alice (née Spencer) Lucy -
see Generation A10
A9) Mary Cheke (b. c.1575) m. Thomas Spencer of Claverdon (c.1570-1630), and had
A10) Alice Spencer (c.1594-1648) m. Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote Hall (1585-1640, descended from Edward I), and had
A11) BRIDGET LUCY, b. 1621; d. 1 Sept. 1692 Broughton Hall, Eccleshall, Staffordshire, bur. 3 Sept. 1692 St Peter Church, Broughton; m. Sir BRIAN BROUGHTON, 1st Baronet of Broughton, b. 23 May 1618; d. 30 July 1708 Broughton Hall, bur. 31 July 1708 St Peter Church, Broughton, son of Thomas Broughton of Broughton Hall (d. 1648) and Frances Bagot (b. 1597), and had
A12) Sir THOMAS BROUGHTON, 2nd Baronet of Broughton, b. c.1650; d. 1710; m. 10 July 1672 St Paul Covent Garden, London, RHODA AMCOTTS (see F14 below), and had
A13) Sir BRYAN BROUGHTON, 3rd Baronet of Broughton, b. 19 Sept. 1677; d. 12 Sept. 1724 Broughton Hall, bur. 15 Sept. 1724 St Peter Church, Broughton; m. 10 Feb. 1710 St Chad Church, Norton-in-Hales, Shropshire, ELIZABETH DELVES (see C12 below), and had
Sir Thomas Broughton, 6th Bt
- see Generation A15
A14) Sir BRYAN BROUGHTON DELVES, 4th Baronet of Broughton, b. 6 Jan. 1718 Broughton Hall, bap. 15 Jan. 1718 St Peter Church, Broughton; d. 11 Aug. 1744, bur. St Peter Church, Broughton; m. 21 May 1738 John's Square, Clerkenwell, London, as her 1st husband, MARY FORESTER (see B16 below), and had
A15) Sir THOMAS BROUGHTON, 6th Baronet of Broughton, b. (posthumous) 2 May 1745 London, bap. 15 May 1745 St George Hanover Square; d. 23 July 1813 Doddington Hall, Cheshire, bur. 30 July 1813 St Peter Church, Broughton; m. 1st 1 Aug. 1766 St Marylebone Parish Church, London, MARY WICKER, b. 2 Mar. 1748 London, bap. 23 Mar. 1748 St James Church, Westminster; d. 7 June 1785 Broughton Hall, bur. 16 June 1785 St Peter Church, Broughton, dau. of John Wicker of Horsham (1711-1767) and Charlotte Colebrooke (1725-1795), and had
A16) ELIZA(BETH) BROUGHTON (1773-1856-see details above), wife of John William Clough

4th Duke of Norfolk -
see Generation B9
B6) Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (1478-1521) m. Lady Eleanor Percy (see E7 below), and had
B7) Lady Elizabeth Stafford (1497-1558) m. Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (1473-1554, descended from Edward I), and had
B8) Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1516-1547) m. Lady Frances Vere (1517-1577, descended from Edward I), and had
B9) Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk (1538-1572) m. 2) Margaret Audley (1540-1564, descended from Edward III), and had
B10) Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk (1561-1626) m. 2) Katherine Knyvett (c.1566-1638, descended from Edward I), and had
B11) Lady Katherine Howard (c.1593-1673) m. William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (1591-1668, descended from Edward III), and had
B12) Charles Cecil, Viscount Cranborne (1619-1660) m. Lady Diana Maxwell (c.1623-1675), and had
3rd Earl of Salisbury -
see Generation B13
B13) James Cecil, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (1646-1683) m. Lady Margaret Manners (see G12 below), and had
B14) Lady Mary Cecil (c.1668-1740) m. Sir William Forester of Dothill Park (1655-1718, descended from Edward I), and had
B15) William Forester of Dothill Park (1690-1758) m. Katherine Brooke (c.1695-1755), and had
B16) MARY FORESTER, b. 20 Dec. 1717 Dothill Park, bap. 9 Jan. 1718 All Saints Church, Wellington; d. 26 Sept. 1779, bur. 27 Sept. 1779 St Ludowanus Church, Ludgvan, Cornwall; m. 1st 21 May 1738 John's Square, Clerkenwell, London, Sir BRYAN BROUGHTON DELVES, 4th Baronet of Broughton (see A14 above)

C3) Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex, by 3rd husband (1404-1483) m. Lady Isabel Plantagenet of York (see D5 below), and had
C4) William, Lord Bourchier (c.1428-1477) m. 2) Lady Anne Woodville (c.1448-1489), and had
C5) Cecily Bourchier (c.1473-1493) m. John Devereux, 9th Lord Ferrers of Chartley (1464-1501, descended from Edward I), and had
1st Viscount Hereford -
see Generation C6
C6) Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford (c.1491-1558) m. 1) Lady Mary Grey (c.1492-1538, descended from Edward III), and had
C7) Sir William Devereux of Merevale Abbey (by 1525-1579) m. Jane Scudamore (c.1527-1607), and had
C8) Margaret Devereux (c.1555-1625) m. Sir Edward Littleton of Pillaton Hall (1549-1610), and had
C9) Jane Littleton (1584-1657) m. Richard Knightley of Fawsley Hall (1580-1650, descended from Edward I), and had
C10) Sir Richard Knightley of Fawsley Hall (c.1610-1661) m. 2) Anne Courten (1615-1703), and had
C11) Jane Knightley (c.1653-1692) m. Sir Thomas Delves, 4th Baronet of Doddington (1652-1727, descended from Edward I), and had
C12) ELIZABETH DELVES, b. 4 Dec. 1678 Doddington Hall, Cheshire, bap. 18 Dec. 1678 St Chad Church, Wybunbury, Cheshire; d. 2 Jan. 1746; m. 10 Feb. 1710 St Chad Church, Norton-in-Hales, Shropshire, Sir BRYAN BROUGHTON, 3rd Baronet of Broughton (see A13 above)

D1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
D2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had a son D3 and a dau E3 (see below)
4th Earl of Northumberland
- see Generation E6
D3) Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March (1374-1398) m. Lady Alianore Holland (1370-1405, descended from Edward I), and had
D4) Lady Anne Mortimer (1388-1411) m. Richard of York, 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385-1415, descended from Edward III), and had
D5) Lady Isabel Plantagenet (1409-1484) m. 2) Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex (see C3 above)

E3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
E4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Lady Eleanor Neville (1403-1472, descended from Edward III), and had
E5) Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421-1461) m. Eleanor Poynings (1428-1484, descended from Edward I), and had a son E6 and a dau F6 (see below)
E6) Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland (c.1449-1489) m. Lady Maud Herbert (c.1457-by 1487), and had
E7) Lady Eleanor Percy (c.1476-1531) m. Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (see B6 above)

F6) Lady Margaret Percy (b. c.1447) m. Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (c.1450-1487, descended from Edward III), and had
F7) Elizabeth Gascoigne (c.1480-1559) m. Sir George Tailboys of South Kyme (1467-1538, descended from Edward I), and had two daus F8 and G8 (see below)
Amcotts of Aisthorpe coat of arms
F8) Anne Tailboys (b. c.1510) m. 1) Sir Edward Dymoke of Scrivelsby Court (by 1508-1567, descended from Edward I), and had
F9) Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby Court (c.1530-1580) m. Lady Bridget Fiennes de Clinton (b. c.1535, descended from Edward I), and had
F10) Margaret Dymoke (d. aft.1611) m. Sir Vincent Fulnetby of Fulnetby Hall (d. 1623, descended from Edward I), and had
F11) Jane Fulnetby (c.1575-1628) m. Sir Richard Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (c.1564-1629), and had
F12) William Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (c.1593-1639) m. Anne Bennett (b. c.1600), and had
F13) John Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (1630-1655) m. Rhoda Hussey (1635-1659), and had
F14) RHODA AMCOTTS, bap. 2 Dec. 1653 St Lawrence Church, Great Corrington, Lincolnshire; bur. 3 Sept. 1692 St Peter Church, Broughton; m. 10 July 1672 St Paul Covent Garden, London, Sir THOMAS BROUGHTON, 2nd Baronet of Broughton (see A12 above)
Dorothy (née Vernon) Manners
- see Generation G9

G8) Margaret Tailboys (c.1515-1558) m. Sir George Vernon of Haddon Hall (1514-1565, descended from Edward I), and had
G9) Dorothy Vernon (c.1545-1584) m. Sir John Manners of Haddon Hall (c.1533-1611, descended from Edward III thru Anne Plantagenet, Duchess of Exeter), and had
G10) Sir George Manners of Haddon Hall (c.1569-1623) m. Grace Pierrepont (d. 1651, descended from Edward I), and had
G11) John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland (1604-1679) m. Hon. Frances Montagu (1613-1671, descended from Edward I), and had
G12) Lady Margaret Manners (1647-1682) m. James Cecil, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (see B13 above)

The next blogpost will show the descent from Edward IV of two British brothers who immigrated to the U.S. and became salesmen in California.

Cheers,                              ------Brad

Friday, March 17, 2017

{111} Ruvigny Addition: Exeter Descent for Blanche (née Clough) Hudson (1844-1879)

Blanche (née Clough) Hudson (1844-1879)
[Photo courtesy of Rosie Long]
A much-needed week-long holiday in the desert delayed the writing of my next blogpost. At first I was a bit frustrated by the delay (one of my new years' resolutions was to blog more frequently), but now I'm absolutely grateful for it. It provided the time for Nanette Walls to stumble upon my previous post on the descendants of Lady Anne (née Townshend) Hudson, and get in touch with me. In one of those nice synchronicities that life gifts you, Nanette is a descendant of the branch of the Hudson family that I was focusing on in my next blogpost. With the help of Nanette and of her sister Rosie Long, I've been able to expand on my research, add more detail, and even add more descendants. I'm very grateful to Nanette and Rosie for input, pictures, portraits, and pedigrees, and their patience in answering my many questions. Lady Anne Hudson, as daughter of a marquess, would have been taught graciousness, and she would no doubt be proud to recognize it in these two of her descendants.
***************************************************************
"The ghost of Blanche is going to get you!!" Three sisters growing up in San Francisco would try to scare each other, referring to a portrait of one of their ancestors hanging on the wall in their home. She had thrown herself in front of a train, they'd been told, because her husband had been unfaithful. Blanche's ghost never did appear, but her sad story continues to haunt, more than a hundred years after her tragic death.

Coney Street, York
Belle Blanche Clough was born in 1844, the third daughter in a large family of eight children of a prominent banker in the city of York. Her father John Clough was a partner in the private banking house of Swann, Clough & Co. on Coney Street. It had been established in 1771, with Blanche's great-grandfather John Clough (1731-1789) as one of its founding partners. The Yorkshire Cloughs had been granted arms as far back as 1612, and in the mid-19th-century, when Blanche was growing up, the family was at its very peak. Clifton House, outside the York city walls just a mile-and-a-half north of the ancient Bootham Bar gateway, was the home the Cloughs used when in the city, and it is where Blanche was born. The Cloughs were also lords of the East Riding manor of North Newbald, eight miles northeast of Beverley, where their seat was Newbald Hall, and where Blanche's father established a public school for 150 children in 1846, two years after Blanche's birth. Her paternal grandfather, John William Clough (1773-1842), who had died two years before Blanche's birth, had made a prestigious marriage in 1795. His bride was Eliza Broughton, from a Staffordshire family that had held its seat of Broughton Hall since the 13th century, and had held the title of baronet since the Restoration. It was an ancient lineage, but Eliza also had banking in her blood, for her maternal grandmother Charlotte Wicker (1725-1795), who lived just long enough to see Eliza wed, dying three months after the wedding, was of the Colebrooke family, one of the most influential London banking dynasties of the 18th-century. Mrs. Wicker could rest assured that her granddaughter had a solid future in store for her as a banker's wife. Blanche's mother Rosina was the youngest daughter of a rear-admiral, and the granddaughter of talented playwright Richard Cumberland, whose works had been hits on the London stage in the late 18th-century and who had been given the honour of burial in the Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey.
Clough of Newbald coat of arms

Blanche's lineage was respectable, though fell short of dazzling: when it came down to it, the Cloughs were still a rising family, bankers who only recently had become landed gentry. In 1862, her eldest sister Rose married a junior officer in the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers who was the son of an admiral. The following year, her eldest brother William Clough, the heir to the banking partnership and the family estates, made a good marriage to the daughter of a long-established Lancashire gentry family. Harrington Hudson, whose proposal to marry Blanche was accepted, made a great first impression. Nine years Blanche's senior, he was the head of a well-connected Yorkshire family whose major sphere of influence was the coastal town of Bridlington, where the Hudsons' chief seat Bessingby Hall was located. Harrington had inherited the family estate aged only thirteen, his mother had remarried to a Hampshire clergyman, and he had spent some time as an officer in the Royal Navy. His father had eschewed any political or magisterial role within the East Riding, but the family reputation was assured by Harrington's uncle Sir James Hudson, who had been Britain's chief diplomat in Italy.
St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York

Blanche married Harrington Hudson on the 11th of January 1865 in the Clough family's church of St. Michael-le-Belfry inside the old city walls of York. Instead of a honeymoon though, the young couple was immediately plunged into mourning, for Blanche's father John Clough died the following day. His funeral was five days afterwards, and the newlywed couple were among the chief mourners, while Rev. Charles Rose, who had performed their wedding, was now performing the burial service. Blanche must have managed some time for intimacy with her new husband, for their first child, daughter Evelyn Hudson, was born practically nine months to the day after the nuptials, but the deep mourning that hung over the first week of Blanche's marriage was a foreboding of the disaster the marriage became.

Scarborough, Yorkshire in the late 19th-century
Harrington proved a complete failure as a landowner. Three years after his wedding, in 1868, he sold Bessingby Hall, which had been the family's pride for over a century, while his attempt to set up with his family at Bossall Hall, the North Riding estate two miles from Aldby Park, the seat of his aunt Harriet (née Hudson) Darley, ended in an auctioning off of horses and stable goods in March 1871. Harrington, Blanche and their three children moved that spring to the resort town of Scarborough, on the northern Yorkshire coast, where their fourth and final child, a daughter named Blanche for her mother, was born the following year. Harrington Hudson, a typical Victorian country gentleman, had a passion for the outdoor sports of hunting and shooting, the pursuit of which seems to have been his primary focus in the 1870s. In this, he took after his father who had no desire for any career beyond that of a landed gentleman, and was completely eclipsed in society by his talented younger brothers. Harrington had lost the landed part, but was attempting to maintain the gentleman status (the 1871 England Census shows that he employed six domestic servants in his Scarborough villa), while his talented younger brother Lt-Col. James Hudson (1838-1912), veteran of the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny, and an East Riding magistrate, eclipsed him on every level. And finally, Harrington Hudson proved to be a brute. On January 27th, 1879, his wife Blanche left Scarborough "in terror of her life" her sister Rose later testified under oath, and "afraid to go home to her husband." She shot herself in a closet in a third-class waiting room at St Pancras Railway Station in London at some point in the evening of Thursday, March 6th, 1879. Her body was found there by a constable at 1AM on Friday the 7th, a pistol in her left hand, "well dressed, and had in her purse several gold coins at the time, and wore three or four articles of jewellery"[*1] ['Shocking Suicide of a Lady: Coroner's Inquest', The Newcastle Courant, Friday, March 14, 1879].
One of the many newspaper
articles on Blanche's
suicide

Over the weekend, Blanche's suicide was reported in newspapers throughout Britain, and reporters packed the coroner's inquest held on Monday, March 10th at the St Pancras Coroner's Court. Testimony was taken under oath from Harrington Hudson, Blanche's brother William Clough, her sister Mrs. Rose Barry, the on-duty physician who examined the body at the station, and by Mr. Brooks, the London attorney whom Blanche had consulted regarding a divorce. The timeline that emerges from the various testimony: Blanche left Scarborough on January 27th, apparently to her sister Rose Barry, the wife of the rector of Litchborough, Northamptonshire. Blanche had her collar bone out of its socket, but put it back in herself, without a doctor called. She was in fear of her life from her husband, and desperate to get possession of her children, back at the villa in Scarborough. On January 29th, Blanche first meets with Mr. Brooks about a divorce or separation. They meet "nearly every day" over the next few weeks, with Blanche apparently commuting into London from Litchborough. Both her sister and her attorney testify that Blanche was in possession of one of her husband's pistols, and was in great distress over the need to gain possession of her children. On Monday, March 4th, Blanche arrives at her birthplace Clifton House, now the home of her brother William Clough, and apparently makes him aware of what has transpired and of her plans for a divorce, for she writes to her sister Rose the following day, "I am advised to go back and live with him, as though nothing had happened," which could only refer to William's reaction. Blanche also wrote that the next day (Wednesday March 6th) she intended to go "to Mr. Wells, at Scarborough, but must not see my dear children. I fear H.H. [her husband] would find me out, and kill me. I am half dead, and don't know if I shall get through what is before me." The inquest didn't inquire as to whether or not Blanche made the trip to Scarborough on the 6th, but her brother William sees her in his drawing room the morning of Thursday, March 7th, where she states she is going to London "to see Mr. Brooks touching a matter with her husband" and "would return that evening." She never shows up for her 3PM meeting with Mr. Brooks, who waits in his office until 9PM. Blanche left a letter addressed to him "in which she said she could not thank him sufficiently for all he had done for her. She hoped her darling brothers and sisters would never have to go through her misery, and praying that God in his mercy would take care of her children. The letter concluded by making some allusion as to the disposal of her property."

Harrington testified that he didn't know where Blanche was, as she hadn't told him where she was going on January 27th. She "had not left him. His wife was at liberty to leave him, and go to any of her friends. She wrote to her children, which letters were shown to him," which was how he had learned she had been at Litchborough Rectory. "She was in good health when she left me...I think that the act was committed by herself, but I think she must have been in an unsound state of mind." When asked whether Blanche had left him on good terms or bad terms, Harrington answered that they "did not part on bad terms, but on good terms. They had been living on good terms, such as people generally do." William Clough testified that "his sister was in a nervous state, and had been in that state for some years...His opinion was that his sister was not accountable for her actions." Under cross-examination, her Rose Barry testified "that her sister had many years ago a severe attack of Paris typhoid fever. She was often in an excitable state." It took the jury only twenty minutes of deliberation to return a verdict: "That the deceased came by her death by shooting herself with a pistol whilst labouring under temporary insanity, and the jury are of opinion that this state of mind was influenced by the unhappy relation existing between herself and her husband. The jury further wish to say that they are not at all satisfied at the way in which the husband gave his evidence."
St Pancras Railway Station c.1880-85

The jury's verdict was just in my opinion. It was indeed Blanche herself who pulled the trigger, and I also agree with the finger pointed at Harrington Hudson. If his testimony is to be believed, he comes across as completely oblivious to his wife's distress, while if Blanche is to be believed, his brutality was the primary cause of it. The attorney Mr. Brooks consulted one Dr. Tristram regarding Blanche's situation, and testified that there was "ample grounds for a separation." Her sister Rose certainly believed that Blanche was in fear of her life from her husband. Blanche wrote to her sister just two days before her death, "All you say I shall try to do, and go on with the case." This was after brother William had encouraged her to return to her husband. I'm not willing to let William Clough off the hook here, but his indifference to his sister's plight likely was due to the heavy matter weighing on his own shoulders: the nearly-hundred-year-old bank of Swann, Clough & Co. had failed. The first notice  to the bank's creditors hit the newspapers on May 15th, 1879, a mere eight weeks after the St Pancras inquest. The bank's failure had a devastating financial impact on the Clough family. Divorce was an expensive business in the Victorian era, available only to the wealthy. Was the family's inability to pay for Blanche's divorce a factor in William encouraging her to return to a husband she feared? Was she made aware that the family bank had failed? Did she go to Scarborough the next day and was spotted? The London attorney Mr. Brooks testified "he thought that deceased was in a perfect state of mind, but was in great distress on account of her children. She said she would never go back to her husband, and went in bodily fear of him." What occurred in the 48 hours between Blanche's letter to her sister and her taking her life at the St Pancras Railway? What made her feel that the only way out for herself was death when just two days before she was willing to pursue her case for divorce: "It will be tried in September, they say," she had written. Too often in the Victorian era, and sadly even today, women were easily dismissed as hysterical when they attempted to speak of or act on uncomfortable truths. Yes, the responsibility for ending her own life falls squarely on Blanche's shoulders, but the responsibility for her feeling that it was her only option also falls on those of her husband and her brother. The two men not only failed financially, they completely failed a woman whom they were expected to love and protect.
The Lodge, Banstead, Surrey

William Clough's later life will be explored in the next blogpost. Harrington Hudson retreated to a quiet country life in Surrey with his children. He purchased The Lodge, a nice-sized house in Banstead (though hardly on the level of Bessingby Hall), where he spent the remaining seventeen years of his life with his two daughters, Evelyn and Blanche. He never remarried. The ghost of Blanche has never appeared to any of her descendants, not even the three young Walls sisters in San Francisco when they were trying to by scary. Perhaps because the lady herself is a figure far more tragic than frightening. If any spirit of Blanche lingers amongst her descendants today, hopefully it pleases her that several of the females among them were able, when things became intolerable on the domestic front, to end their marriages and not their lives. Domestic violence is far from being wiped out, but at least steps toward progress have been made since that fatal night in 1879 at St Pancras Railway Station.

[*1] Family legend has it that the necklace Blanche Hudson is wearing in her portrait miniature was one of the items of jewelry she was wearing when she killed herself at St Pancras Station. The necklace is today in the possession of sisters Nanette Walls and Rosie Long.

(BELLE) BLANCHE CLOUGH, b. 9 June 1844 Clifton House, York, bap. 4 July 1844 St Michael-le-Belfry, York; d. (suicide) 6 Mar. 1879 St Pancras Railway Station, London, 3rd dau. of John Clough of Clifton House, banker (1803-1865, descended from Edward III - see Generation 18 below) and Rosina Cumberland (1811-1869, descended from Edward I); m. 11 Jan. 1865 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York, HARRINGTON HUDSON of Bessingby Hall, Yorkshire, b. there 7 Oct. 1835, bap. 13 Oct. 1835 St Magnus Church, Bessingby; d. 9 Feb. 1896 The Lodge, Banstead, Surrey, bur. 13 Feb. 1896 All Saints Churchyard, Banstead, est son of Harrington George Frederick Hudson of Bessingby Hall (1798-1848, descended from Edward IV) and Charlotte Watt (1814-1891), and had issue, two sons and two daughters.
St Magnus Church, Bessingby, Yorkshire

Issue of Blanche (Clough) and Harrington Hudson:

1) EVELYN HUDSON, b. 14 Oct. 1865 Bessingby Hall, bap. 15 Nov. 1865 St Magnus Church, Bessingby; d.s.p. 16 Oct. 1951 Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester; m. 1st 1898, as his 2nd wife, HARRY HEPWORTH POWIS, b. Oct. 1867 Slough, Buckinghamshire, bap. 12 June 1874 St Matthias Church, Earls Court, London; d.s.p. 1901, son of Lt. Charles William Powis of Putney (1836-1919) and Isabella Harrison Napper (b. 1844); m. 2nd 28 June 1911 St Saviour Church, Chelsea, London, as his 2nd wife, JAMES ASHTON RADCLIFFE of Tolpuddle, Dorset, Master of the South Dorset Hounds 1901-29, b. Grove Cottage, Rochdale, Lancashire, bap. 21 Nov. 1849 St Chad Church, Rochdale; d.s.p. 3 Sept. 1929 Tolpuddle, son of James Radcliffe of Grove Cottage (b. 1821) and Mary Butterworth (b. c.1830).

2) HARRINGTON HUDSON of Southgate, Bournemouth, Dorset, with the British India Steam Navigation Company, b. 7 Mar. 1867 Bossall Hall, Yorkshire, bap. 9 Apr. 1867 St Botolph Church, Bossall; d. unm. 6 Feb. 1898 Southgate, Bournemouth[*2].
Blanche (née Hudson) Bond
(1872-1946)

3) JAMES HUDSON, b. 7 July 1869 Bossall Hall, bap. 30 July 1869 St Botolph Church, Bossall; d.  after 1881[*3].

4) BLANCHE HUDSON, b. 2 Aug. 1872 Scarborough, Yorkshire, bap. 31 Oct. 1872 St Mary Church, Scarborough; d. 22 July 1946 Portrush, co. Antrim, Ireland; m. 3 Nov. 1896 St James Church, Westminster, (JOHN LINCOLN) FLEETWOOD BOND of West Parley House, Dorset, b. 15 Dec. 1869 Belgravia, London, bap. 26 Apr. 1874 St Peter Church, Freston, Suffolk; d. by 1922, yst. son of Rev. Alfred Bond, Rector of Freston 1853-80 (1827-1912) and his 1st wife Georgiana Eliza Tharp (1829-1878), and had issue, two sons and three daughters.

[*2] On the death without issue of Harrington Hudson in 1898, senior representation of the line of Lady Anne (Townshend) Hudson, and of the Hudsons of Bessingby Hall, fell to his elder sister Evelyn (Hudson) (Powis) Radcliffe. On her death without issue in 1951, senior representation fell to Hazel Elizabeth (Bond) Littledale (1924-2005), granddaughter of Evelyn's younger sister Blanche (Hudson) Bond.

[*3] James Hudson appears with his parents and elder brother in Scarborough in the 1871 England Census (sister Evelyn was a visitor in a Great Malvern, Worcestershire household). In the 1881 England Census, he is listed as "deaf from birth" in a school for the deaf in Willesden, Middlesex. There's no apparent match for James in the 1891 England Census, so presumably he had died by then.
James Hudson "deaf from birth" in the 1881 England Census
Given that Sir Bernard Burke first included the Cloughs of Clifton House in the 1871 fifth edition of his Burke's Landed Gentry, and the family remained in through the 1898 ninth edition, it's interesting that Ruvigny, who notes the marriage of Eliza Broughton to John William Clough on p. 227 of his 1907 Exeter volume, didn't trace their descendants. Below is the line Ruvigny presented, with elaboration.

Edward III had a second surviving son,
1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
3rd Duke of York - see
Generation 5
2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
3) Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March (1374-1398) m. Lady Alianore Holland (1370-1405, descended from Edward I), and had
4) Lady Anne Mortimer (1388-1411) m. Richard of York, 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385-1415, descended from Edward III), and had
5) Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (1411-1460) m. Lady Cecily Neville (1415-1495, descended from Edward III), and had
6) Anne Plantagenet, Duchess of Exeter (1439-1476) m. 2) Sir Thomas St Leger (by 1438-1483), and had
7) Lady Anne St Leger (1475-1526) m. George Manners, 11th Lord Ros (1470-1513, descended from Edward I), and had
8) Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland (c.1497-1543) m. 2) Eleanor Paston (c.1505-1551, descended from Edward I), and had
9) Sir John Manners of Haddon Hall (c.1533-1611) m. Dorothy Vernon (c.1545-1584, descended from Edward III), and had
8th Earl of Rutland -
see Generation 11
10) Sir George Manners of Haddon Hall (c.1569-1623) m. Grace Pierrepont (d. 1651, descended from Edward I), and had
11) John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland (1604-1679) m. Hon. Frances Montagu (1613-1671, descended from Edward I), and had
12) Lady MARGARET MANNERS, bap. 2 June 1647 St Clement Danes, London; d. Aug. 1682 Paris, France; m. (lic. 25 Sept.) 1661, JAMES CECIL, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, b. 1646; d. 24 May 1683 Hatfield House, Hertfordshire, bur. St Etheldreda Church, Hatfield, son of Charles Cecil, Viscount Cranborne (1619-1660, descended from Edward III) and Lady Diana Maxwell (c.1623-1675), and had
13) Lady MARY CECIL, b. c.1668 (“Fifteen years or thereabouts” at marriage, per bond); d. 29 Mar. 1740; m. 23 May 1684 St James Duke's Place, London, Sir WILLIAM FORESTER of Dothill Park, Wellington, Shropshire, M.P. Much Wenlock 1679-1713, b. 10 Dec. 1655 Dothill Park, bap. All Saints Church, Wellington; bur. there 22 Feb. 1718, son of Francis Forester of Wellington (1623-1684, descended from Edward I) and Hon. Mary Newport (1617-1661, descended from Edward I), and had
Forester of Dothill coat of arms
14) WILLIAM FORESTER of Dothill Park, M.P. Wenlock 1715-22, 1734-41, 1754-58, b. 1690; d. 12 Nov. 1758, bur. 17 Nov. 1758 All Saints Church, Wellington; m. 1714, KATHERINE BROOKE, b. c.1695; d. 27 Aug. 1755 Dothill Park, bur. 2 Sept. 1755 All Saints Church, Wellington, only dau. of  William Brooke of Clerkenwell, Director of the South Sea Company 1721-37 (1662-1737), and had
15) MARY FORESTER, b. 20 Dec. 1717 Dothill Park, bap. 9 Jan. 1718 All Saints Church, Wellington; d. 26 Sept. 1779, bur. 27 Sept. 1779 St Ludowanus Church, Ludgvan, Cornwall; m. 1st 21 May 1738 John's Square, Clerkenwell, London, Sir BRYAN BROUGHTON DELVES, 4th Baronet of Broughton, b. 6 Jan. 1718 Broughton Hall, Eccleshall, Staffordshire, bap. 15 Jan. 1718 St Peter Church, Broughton; d. 11 Aug. 1744, bur. St Peter Church, Broughton, son of Sir Bryan Broughton, 3rd Baronet of Broughton (1677-1724, descended from Edward III) and Elizabeth Delves (1678-1746, descended from Edward III), and had
16) Sir THOMAS BROUGHTON, 6th Baronet of Broughton, b. (posthumous) 2 May 1745 London, bap. 15 May 1745 St George Hanover Square; d. 23 July 1813 Doddington Hall, Cheshire, bur. 30 July 1813 St Peter Church, Broughton; m. 1st 1 Aug. 1766 St Marylebone Parish Church, London, MARY WICKER, b. 2 Mar. 1748 London, bap. 23 Mar. 1748 St James Church, Westminster; d. 7 June 1785 Broughton Hall, bur. 16 June 1785 St Peter Church, Broughton, dau. of John Wicker of Horsham (1711-1767) and Charlotte Colebrooke (1725-1795), and had
Sir Thomas Broughton, 6th Bt
- see Generation 16
17) ELIZA(BETH) BROUGHTON, b. 25 Sept. 1773 Bercher, Vaud, Switzerland, bap. 4 Sept. 1774 St Peter Church, Broughton; d. 6 Feb. 1856 Torquay, Devon, bur. 12 Feb. 1856 St Saviour Churchyard, Tormohun, Devon; m. 28 May 1795 St Marylebone Parish Church, London, JOHN WILLIAM CLOUGH of Oxton Hall, Yorkshire, banker, bap. 14 May 1773 St Michael-le-Belfry Church, York; d. 15 Oct. 1842 Newbald Hall, Yorkshire, bur. 21 Oct. 1842 St Nicholas Church, North Newbald, son of John Clough of York, banker (1731-1789) and Rebecca Costabadie (1731-1802), and had
18) JOHN CLOUGH of Clifton House, York, banker, b. 28 Jan. 1803 Bramham, Yorkshire, bap. 8 Feb. 1803 All Saints Church, Bramham; d. 12 Jan. 1865 Clifton House, bur. 17 Jan. 1865 York Cemetery; m. 23 July 1833 Cheltenham Minster, Gloucestershire, ROSINA CUMBERLAND, b. 16 Dec. 1811 Norwich, Norfolk, bap. 28 Jan. 1812 St John de Sepulchre Church, Norwich; d. 7 July 1869 Marylebone, London, bur. 12 July 1869 Kensal Green Cemetery, London, yst dau. of RAdm. William Cumberland of Cheltenham (1765-1832, descended from Edward I) and Elizabeth Pym Burt (1779-1840), and had
19) (BELLE) BLANCHE CLOUGH (1844-1879-see details above)

The next blogpost will look at the other children and remaining Edward III descents for Blanche's father John Clough.

Cheers,                             --------Brad