Monday, June 6, 2016

James V and mtDNA Descents for Lord Byron (1788-1824)

Lord Byron (1788-1824)
I want to thank my friend John Higgins for bringing my attention to a line of descent for the famous poet George Gordon, 6th Baron Byron from James V of Scotland's illegitimate son the Earl of Moray. It's a 11-generation descent through Lord Byron's maternal grandmother Katharine Abercromby.

The Abercrombys of Glassaugh House, in the parish of Fordyce, Banffshire, were a collateral branch of the Abercromby baronets of Birkenbog House, also in Banffshire. Though Burke's Peerage 107th Edition (2003), pp. 7-8, provides a nice pedigree of the Abercromby baronets of Birkenbog, it doesn't trace the Glassaugh House branch. Nick Kingsley, in his blog Landed Families of Britain and Ireland, has a post 'Abercromby of Birkenbog and Forglen, baronets', which includes much more detail than Burke's, and which does trace the Glassaugh House line. It doesn't however identify the spouses which provide that line with the descent from James V and earlier Stewart monarchs.

James V = Margaret Erskine (d. 1572), and had
1st Earl of Moray -
see Generation 1
1) James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray, illegit. (1531-1570) m. Lady Agnes Keith (c.1544-1588, descended from James I of Scotland), and had
2) Elizabeth Stewart, 2nd Countess of Moray (1565-1591) m. James Stewart, 2nd Lord Doune, Earl of Moray (1565-1592, descended from Edward III), and had
3) Lady Grizel Stewart (b. c.1590) m. Sir Robert Innes, 1st Baronet of that Ilk (1584-1658, descended from James IV), and had
4) ELIZABETH INNES, b. c.1613; d. 12 Aug. 1640; m. 2nd[*1] 28 Oct. 1635 Innes, Morayshire, Scotland, ALEXANDER BRODIE, 15th Laird of Brodie, b. 25 July 1617; d. 17 Apr. 1680, son of David, 14th Laird of Brodie (1586-1632) and Katherine Dunbar (d. aft.1664), and had
5) GRIZEL BRODIE, b. 28 Aug. 1636 Brodie Castle, Dyke, Morayshire, Scotland, bap. 2 Sept. 1636 Dyke Parish Church; d. unknown; m. 7 Sept. 1654, Sir ROBERT DUNBAR, 3rd Laird of Grangehill House, Elginshire, Scotland b. c.1625; d. (21 Sept. 1689?)[*2], son of Ninian Dunbar, 2nd Laird of Grangehill House (c.1585-aft.1647) and his 1st wife Marion Ogilvy of Dunlugas House (c.1595-by 1629, descended from James I of Scotland), and had
6) KATHERINE DUNBAR, b. 7 Aug. 1655; d. unknown; m. 2nd[*3] 22 July 1675 Dyke Parish Church, ALEXANDER ABERCROMBY, 2nd of Glassaugh House, b. c.1650; d. 1690, son and heir of John Abercromby, 1st of Glassaugh House (c.1610-1691) and Katherine Gordon of Lesmoir Castle (descended from James I of Scotland), and had
7) ALEXANDER ABERCROMBY, 3rd of Glassaugh House, M.P. Banffshire 1706-27, b. 5 Nov. 1678; d. 23 Dec. 1729; m. by 1703, HELEN MELDRUM, b. c.1685; d. aft.1744, dau. of Rev. George Meldrum of Crombie, Minister of Glass (1616-1692) and Jean Duff of Keithmore (c.1660-1725, descended from Edward III), and had[*4]
8) KATHARINE ABERCROMBY, b. Glassaugh House, bap. 9 May 1708 Fordyce Parish Church; d. 8 Oct. 1784, bur. Banff Parish Church, Banffshire; m. 26 Nov. 1729, ALEXANDER INNES of Rosieburn House, Banffshire, b. Dec. 1701; d. 16 Apr. 1761, bur. Banff Parish Church, son of John Innes, 6th of Edingight House (1662-1719, descended from James IV) and Helen Strachan, and had
9) KATHARINE INNES, b. c.1742; d. 16 Aug. 1782; m. 2 June 1763 Banff Parish Church, GEORGE GORDON, 12th Laird of Gight Castle, bap. 14 Nov. 1740 Ardlogie, Morayshire, Scotland; d. 9 Jan. 1779 Bath, Somersetshire, bur. 15 Jan. 1779 Bath Abbey, son and heir of Alexander Gordon, 11th Laird of Gight Castle (1716-1760, descended from James I of Scotland) and Margaret Duff (1720-1801, descended from Edward III), and had
Katharine (née Gordon), Lady Byron
- see Generation 10
10) KATHARINE GORDONbap. 22 Apr. 1764 Banff Parish Church ("Katharine, daughter of George Gordon of Gight and Mrs. Katharine Innes, Lady Gight, was baptised and named after Mrs. Katharine Abercrombie, relict of Alexander Innes of Rosieburn, the grandmother by the mother"); d. 1 Aug. 1811 Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire, bur. 9 Aug. 1811 St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall Torkard, Nottinghamshire; m. 12 May 1785 St Michael Church, Bath, as his 2nd wife, Capt. JOHN BYRON of Marylebone, b. 7 Feb. 1757 Plymouth, Devon, bap. 17 Mar. 1757 St Andrew Church, Plymouth; d. 2 Aug. 1791 Valenciennes, France, er son of Hon. John Byron of Plymouth (1723-1786, descended from Edward III) and Sophia Trevanion (1730-1790, descended from Edward III), and had
11) GEORGE GORDON, 6th Baron BYRON of Rochdale, b. 22 Jan. 1788 Marylebone, London, bap. 1 Mar. 1788 St Marylebone Parish Church; d. 19 Apr. 1824 Missolonghi, Greece, bur. 16 July 1824 St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall Torkard, Nottinghamshire - the famous Lord Byron

[*1] Elizabeth Innes m. 1st by 1632, John Urquhart, 3rd of Craigston Castle, d. 30 Mar. 1634, son of John Urquhart, 2nd of Craigston Castle (d. 1631) and Isabel Irvine of Drum Castle (descended from James I of Scotland). Elizabeth's second marriage to Alexander Brodie, the birth and marriage dates of their only daughter Grizel Brodie, plus the birthdate of their eldest granddaughter Katherine Dunbar, are all found in The Diary of Alexander Brodie of Brodie.
Grangehill House (today Dalvey House), Elginshire
[Image from Castles and Manor Houses of the Clan Grant]
[*2] Many genealogies give 21 Sept. 1659 as the date of death of Sir Robert Dunbar. But as The Dunbar Pedigree makes clear, he was M.P. for Elgin and Fores-shire 1669-70, and he and his wife Grizel Brodie had eleven children, so 1659 is incorrect for his death. Perhaps '1659' was originally a mis-transcription of '1689'?
Abercromby Coat of Arms
[Argent, a chevron, Gules,
between three boars' heads
]

[*3] Katherine Dunbar m. 1st 6 Nov. 1673 Dyke Parish Church, Charles Gordon (1631-1674), a yr son of Sir Robert Gordon, 1st Baronet of Gordonstoun. Katherine m. 3rd, James Ogilvy of Badintoul (living 1707), a man for whom I can find little information. By her third husband she had further issue, two daughters, one of whom was Anna Ogilvy, wife of Rev. Walter Turing, minister of Rayne (c.1671-1743). Katherine had by her second husband three sons Alexander (see above), James Abercromby (bap. 14 June 1683 Fordyce) and George Abercromby (bap. 1 Dec. 1684 Fordyce), and two daughters: Elizabeth Abercromby (1686-1756), 2nd wife of William Baird of Auchmedden (1676-1720) and Grizzel Abercromby, wife of Malcom Fraser of Culduthell.

[*4] Alexander Abercromby and Helen Meldrum had two sons and five daughters: Jean Abercromby (b. 1704) m. 1729 George Joass of Colleonard (1707-1755); Ann Abercromby (b. 1705, d. young); Gen. James Abercromby, 4th of Glassaugh House (1706-1781); Katherine (see above); Isabel Abercromby (b. 1710, d. unm.); Helen Abercromby (1712-1781) m. 1732 James Duff of Craigston; Alexander Abercromby (b. 1721), an artist, with a life patent as King’s limner in Scotland.

This has also opened up Lord Byron's matrilineal (mtDNA) line ten generations in my database:

1) Jean Barclay (d. 1607) m. Robert Innes, 4th Laird of Invermarkie Castle (c.1555-1595, descended from Edward III), and had
2) Margaret Innes m. Patrick Og Grant of Easter Elchies (c.1575-by 1640, descended from Edward III), and had
Innes Coat of Arms
3) Margaret Grant m. Alexander Grant of Allachie (d. aft.1672), and had
4) Helen Grant (c.1635-1694) m. Alexander Duff of Keithmore (1623-1696, descended from Edward III), and had
5) Jean Duff (c.1660-1725) m. Rev. George Meldrum of Crombie (1616-1692), and had
6) Helen Meldrum (c.1685-aft.1744) m. Alexander Abercromby, 3rd of Glassaugh House (1678-1729, descended from James V), and had
7) Katharine Abercromby (1708-1784) m. Alexander Innes of Rosieburn House (1701-1761, descended from James IV), and had
8) Katherine Innes (c.1742-1782) m. George Gordon, 12th Laird of Gight Castle (1740-1779, descended from James I of Scotland), and had
9) Katharine Gordon (1764-1811) m. Capt. John Byron of Marylebone (1757-1791, descended from Edward III), and had
10) George Gordon, 6th Baron Byron of Rochdale (1788-1824)

Jean Barclay above has no apparent descents from Edward I so her lineage falls outside the scope of my project. For anyone interested in taking Lord Byron's mtDNA line further back, the parents of Jean Barclay were Walter Barclay of Towie (d. 1587) and Elizabeth Hay of Dalgety.

There is an another James IV line for Lord Byron thru his Abercromby of Glassaugh ancestry, in addition to this one thru James V. The former blogpost 'James IV Descents for Katharine (née Gordon) (1764-1811), Mother of Lord Byron' has been updated to include it.

Thanks again to John Higgins for opening up the Abercromby of Glassaugh ancestry.

Cheers,                                 ------Brad

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Edward III Descents for Francis Noel-Baker, M.P. (1920-2009)

Francis Edward Noel-Baker (1920-2009)
The most notable descendant (to date) of Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory (1775-1853) is Francis Noel-Baker, a Labour Party politician who was returned to Parliament for Brentford and Chiswick in the 1945 general election, unseating the Conservative, becoming at age 25 the youngest member in the House. Noel-Baker shares an entry in ODNB with his father, Philip Noel-Baker, a remarkable man who won a Silver Medal for the men's 1500 metres event at the 1920 Antwerp Olympics, and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1959 for his efforts in disarmament.

The Bakers were a Quaker family for generations. Philip's father, (Joseph) Allen Baker, was born in Canada, where the family had emigrated from Ireland in 1819. In the late 1870's Allen Baker was sent by his father to England to take charge of a newly established branch of the family engineering business, Baker & Sons, of which he became chairman in 1892 on the death of his father. In 1879 they set up business in Finsbury but the trade expanded and, in 1890 a move was made to a large, newly built engineering works in Hythe Road, Willesden, where it remained for the next 43 years. As Quakers, the Baker family tried to run a model business taking a paternal interest in the welfare of their workforce and introducing schemes such as shorter working days, encouraging employees to participate in health and insurance plans and fostering a relaxed approach on the shop floor, perhaps to the detriment of profits. The company had interests in Britain, Canada, Australia and the USA. In Britain, Allen Baker married the deeply religious Scotswoman Elizabeth Balmer Moscrip, whose family lived at Morebattle, in Roxburghshire, a Border village seven miles from Kelso, through which the railway passed along the valley of the Tweed. Philip was the sixth of the couple's seven children.
Philip and Irene Noel-Baker during World War I,
when their romance began
[Image from An Isle of Greece: the Noels in Euboea]

During the First World War he served with the Friends' Ambulance Unit in France and in Italy, where he was awarded medals for bravery and met Irene Noel, who was working as a nurse. She was a friend of Virginia Woolf, and the daughter of Frank Noel, the British owner of a Greek estate, Achmetaga (today Prokopi) on the island of Euboea (today, Evia). The Achmetaga estate had been purchased from its Turkish owner in 1832 by Edward Noel, who had been educated at the agricultural school of Hofwyl near Bern in Switzerland which had been founded by Emanuel von Fellenberg, a leading educationalist in Europe, whose aim was to bring, through agriculture, rich and poor people closer together. Inspired by these ideas, and in the wake of the great wave of philhellenism that had passed through Europe following the 1821 Greek War of Independence against the Ottoman occupiers of Greece, Edward Noel together with von Fellenberg's youngest son, Fredrick, traveled to Greece in 1832 with the hope of contributing to the betterment of the lot of impoverished Greek peasants by creating an agricultural school in Greece along the lines of Hofwyl. The acquiring of the estate on Euboea, where they envisioned establishing the school, was bedeviled by the then Greek Government's policy concerning privately-owned land; both Edward and Fredrick fell ill from malaria which was endemic in northern Euboea, and Frederick died. But then in partnership with another school fellow from Hofwyl, Karl von Müller, and with the support of Edward's cousin Anne Isabella, Lady Byron (later 11th Baroness Wentworth) and others, the resuscitation and working of the Achmetaga estate eventually went ahead. The family has been in continuous possession of the estate for over 175 years, and a detailed history--An Isle of Greece: The Noels in Euboea--was written and published by Barbro, the second wife of Francis Noel-Baker, in 2000. When Irene Baker inherited the estate from her father Frank Noel in 1919, her husband Philip adopted the surname Noel along with his own, and by the 1940s, he hyphenated his surname as Noel-Baker, which his descendants have adopted to the present day.
Achmetaga in the 1870s
After suffering two miscarriages, Irene Noel-Baker gave birth in 1920 at the age of 41 to their only child Francis Edward, whom she named after her recently-deceased father. When Irene's friend Virginia Woolf first met Philip Baker, she had dismissed him: "Irene has got engaged to a commoner who runs." But Philip ended up appreciated by both Virginia and her husband Leonard Woolf, due to their shared commitment to the progressive Fabian Society, and the two couples became close friends. As the years went on, the age difference between the Noel-Bakers (Irene was eleven years older than her husband) grew more pronounced, and they spent much time separated, with Irene in Greece focused on running the estate and Philip in England focused on his political career. For twenty years, from 1936 until Irene's death in 1956, Philip had an affair with Liberal (and later Labour) MP Megan Lloyd George (1902-1966), daughter of former Prime Minister David Lloyd George. In 1977, Philip Noel-Baker became a life peer, Baron Noel-Baker of Derby.
Philip, Baron Noel-Baker
(1889-1982)

Since Philip's five years as a life peer occurred within the large gap between the 1970 105th edition of Burke's Peerage and the 1999 106th edition, the Noel-Bakers do not appear in that series. There is an entry for Baron Noel-Baker in the 1980 edition of Debrett's Peerage. It is very scanty on genealogical details (it completely overlooks Francis Noel-Baker's first marriage, for example), so hopefully the information below will serve as a helpful addition to the 1980 account in Debrett's.

FRANCIS EDWARD NOEL-BAKER of Kandili, Prokopi, Evia, Greece, M.P. Brentford & Chiswick 1945-50; Swindon 1955-69, b. 7 Jan. 1920 Kensington, London; d. 25 Sept. 2009 Kandili, only son of Philip John, Baron Noel-Baker of Derby and Irene Noel (1878-1956, descended from Edward III - see A21 below); m. 1st 1 Aug. 1947 House of Commons Crypt, Westminster, London (divorce 1955), as her 1st husband[*1], ANN LAVINIA SAUNDERS, b. 1928, dau. of Hilary Aidan St George Saunders of Broad Oak (1898-1951) and his 2nd wife Joan Wilhelmina Bedford (1902-1984), and had issue, two sons; m. 2nd 26 July 1957 Swindon, Wiltshire, BARBRO KRISTINA SONANDER, b. 1924 Norrköping, Östergötland, Sweden; d. 2004 Kandili, dau. of Josef Karl Sonander, engineer, and had further issue, two sons and a daughter.

Issue of Francis Edward and Ann Lavinia (Saunders) Noel-Baker:

1) EDWARD PHILIP NOEL-BAKER of Notting Hill, b. 1948.

2) MARTIN HILARY JOHN BYRON NOEL-BAKER, b. 25 July 1951; d. 30 Nov. 1990, leaving issue, one daughter.
Michael Chance (b. 1955)

Issue of Francis Edward and Barbro Kristina (Sonander) Noel-Baker:

3) PHILIP FRANCIS NOEL-BAKER of Kandili, travel agent, b. Aug. 1958, has two sons.

4) IRENE IDA NOEL-BAKER, psychologist, translator, poet, b. 1960; m. 1991 London, MICHAEL EDWARD FERGUSON CHANCE, CBE, countertenor and founder The Grange Festival,  b. 7 March 1955 Penn, Buckinghamshire, and has issue, one son and one daughter.

5) (JOSEPH) ALLAN FREDERICK NOEL-BAKER of Marlow, Buckinghamshire, financial public relations, b. 1962; m. 31 May 1997, LOUISE SEYDLITZ, b. 1966, dau. of Slawomir Seydlitz of Harefield, and has issue, one son and one daughter.
Ann (née Saunders) Noel-Baker

[*1] Ann (née Saunders) Noel-Baker m. 2nd 1956 Buckinghamshire, John H. B. Irving, b. 1924. Ann's father Hilary Saunders was the co-author, with John Palmer (both men publishing their collaborative fiction using the pseudonym Francis Breeding), of four novels, the best known being The House of Dr. Edwardes (1927), which was adapted in 1945 into the Alfred Hitchcock film Spellbound. Saunders also was the librarian of the House of Commons from 1946-1950. Footage of Ann's first wedding to Francis Noel-Baker can be viewed, here.

Through his mother, Francis Noel-Baker has six lines of descent from Edward III. The three through Lionel, Duke of Clarence are as follows.

Edward III had a 2nd surviving son:
A1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
A2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
A3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
A4) Lady Elizabeth Percy (c.1395-1437) m. 1) John, 7th Lord Clifford (1388-1422, descended from Edward I), and had
Wentworth/Clifford impalement in the Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace
A5) Mary Clifford (c.1420-by1458) m. Sir Philip Wentworth of Nettlestead (1424-1464), and had
A6) Sir Henry Wentworth of Nettlestead (1448-1499) m. 1) Anne Say (c.1448-aft.1489), and had a son A7 and a dau C7 (see below)
A7) Sir Richard Wentworth of Nettlestead (by 1480-1528) m. Anne Tyrell (descended from Edward I), and had
A8) Thomas, 1st Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (1501-1551) m. Margaret Fortescue (b. 1504, descended from Edward III), and had a son A9 and a dau B9 (see below)
A9) Thomas, 2nd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (1525-1584) m. 2) Anne Wentworth (d. 1571, descended from Edward I), and had
1st Earl of Cleveland -
see Generation A11
A10) Henry, 3rd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (1558-1593) m. Anne Hopton (d. 1625, descended from Edward I), and had
A11) Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Cleveland (1591-1667) m. 1) Anne Crofts (see B12 below), and had
A12) Anne, 7th Baroness Wentworth of Nettlestead (1623-1697) m. John, 2nd Baron Lovelace of Hurley (1634-1670), and had
A13) Hon. Margaret Lovelace (1642-1671) m. Sir William Noel, 2nd Baronet of Kirkby Mallory (c.1640-1675, descended from Edward III), and had
A14) Sir John Noel, 4th Baronet of Kirkby Mallory (1667-1697) m. Mary Clobery (c.1672-1751), and had
A15) Sir Clobery Noel, 5th Baronet of Kirkby Mallory (1694-1733) m. Elizabeth Rowney (c.1695-1743), and had
A16) Edward Noel, 1st Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1715-1774) m. Judith Lamb (1725-1761), and had
A17) Thomas Noel, 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1745-1815) = Anna Caterina van Loo (c.1750-1781), and had
A18) Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory, illegit. (1775-1853) m. 1) Catherine Smith (see C16 below), and had
Francis Edward 'Frank' Noel
- see Generation A20
A19) EDWARD HENRY NOEL of Hampstead, Middlesex and Achmetaga, Euboea [today Evia], Greece, b. 18 June 1811 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 29 Feb. 1884 Hampstead, bur. 5 Mar. 1884 St Mary Church, Hendon, Middlesex; m. 18 June 1838 St Mary Church, Ealing, Middlesex, FRANCES ISABELLA DOYLE, b. 1819 Bengal, India; d. 5 Nov. 1845 Torquay, Devon, bur. 11 Nov. 1845 St Saviour Church, Tormohun, Devon, dau. of Maj-Gen. Carlo Joseph Doyle (1787-1848) and "Chiano Begum" (d. by 1820)[*2], and had
A20) FRANCIS EDWARD 'Frank' NOEL of Achmetaga, b. 31 July 1844 Leamington Priors, bap. 4 Sept. 1844 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; d. 28 Sept. 1919 Achmetaga, bur. there; m. 26 Feb. 1876 St Stephen Kensington, London (divorce c.1885)[*3], EDITH ELLEN VINER, bap. 8 Aug. 1856 All Saints Church, St John's Wood, Middlesex; bur. 19 Aug. 1893 St Peter Church, Turnham, Buckinghamshire, yst dau. of Thomas Viner, coffee merchant, of Ceylon & Wavendon Lodge, Woburn, Buckinghamshire (c.1808-1884) and Emma ---, and had
A21)  IRENE NOEL, b. 26 July 1878 Achmetaga; d. 8 Feb. 1956 Belgravia, London, bur. St James Churchyard, Heyshott, Sussex; m. 12 June 1915 Crabbet Park, Surrey, PHILIP JOHN BAKER [later NOEL-BAKER], Baron Noel-Baker of Derby, b. 1 Nov. 1889 Brondesbury Park, Brent, Middlesex; d. 8 Oct. 1982 Belgravia, bur. St James Churchyard, Heyshott, yr son of (Joseph) Allen Baker of Brondesbury Park, M.P. (1852-1918) and Elizabeth Balmer Moscrip (1849-1930), and had issue,
A22) FRANCIS EDWARD NOEL-BAKER, M.P. (1920-2009 - see details above)

Frances Isabella 'Fanny' (née Doyle) Noel (1819-1845)
[Image from An Isle of Greece:  the Noels in Euboea]
[*2] Frances Isabella 'Fanny' Doyle was of inter-cultural parentage. As Fanny herself relayed in a letter in the 1830s: “My mother’s country was Rajasthan. Her name was Chiano Begum. My father called her Sishina. She was a Moglanee, that is a Mogul woman and a Mohammedan of the sect of Ali. She had been the wife of a Mogul of some rank, but he abandoned her and was afterwards killed in service of some native power. All Moglanees add Begum or ‘Khanian’ to their names if they have any pretension to rank. Moglanee is princess and the second lady" [Transcribed in An Isle of Greece: the Noels in Euboea, p. 102]. Barbro Noel-Baker shared the little further that she could on Fanny's East Indian mother: “It would not have been possible for her to be a Rajput unless she was a Hindu who had married a Muslim of some rank in the Mogul court. This did happen occasionally. The names given in her daughter’s letter sound like Muslim names. Mogul is another way of saying Mongol or Mongolian. Sections of the army of Genghis Khan invaded Russia and then came into India at the end of the fifteenth century. By the end of the eighteenth century, the language of the Mogul Court was Persian and Urdu, a Persian form of Hindi...We do not know much about our own Rajput lady. Apparently Fanny and her sister were very young when she died. Colonel Doyle returned to England in 1820 with his two little daughters, Selina and Fanny. Selina was named after Carlo’s sister and Fanny after his brother, Sir Francis Doyle. Fanny kept a miniature of her mother, which unfortunately has disappeared...the other daughter, Selina, had died in 1831." Barbro Noel-Baker also researched Fanny's father Maj-Gen. Carlo Doyle: "Doyle was a nephew of Sir John Doyle who had raised the 87th Prince of Wales’ Irish Regiment in 1793. Carlo became an ensign in 1803 when his uncle commanded the Regiment. He rose in rank while serving in the Peninsular War and was made Lieut. Colonel in 1815. Around this time he went to India as Military Secretary to the first Governor General of British India, Lord Hastings. Doyle’s regiment was based in Bengal and, to judge from existing manuscripts, he seems to have been prominent during and after the final Mahratta War which brought the whole of India under British control…Colonel Doyle did not marry again. He stayed on in England till 1834. Like many other officers returning home from India in those days, he seems to have suffered from a shortage of money and was happy to settle for a regular occupation. In 1834 he was appointed Government Secretary to Jamaica. He was promoted full Colonel in 1837 and four years later he was made Governor of Grenada in the West Indies, at which post he remained for the rest of his career. As a pensioner in England, he went into decline, enjoyed his port and died in 1848. In his will he cared mainly for his sister but left legacies to his daughter, Fanny, and her children." So far this is the second Anglo-Indian line I've encountered while building my database. I find it fascinating, but as there aren't any readily apparent lines back to Edward I in the ancestry of Carlo Doyle, further research into this branch of Francis Noel-Baker's ancestry is outside the scope of my project.
Edith (née Viner) Noel (1856-1893) 
[Image from An Isle of Greece: the Noels in Euboea]

[*3] The marriage of Edith and Frank Noel disintegrated rather dramatically amidst their quiet rural existence at Achmetaga. Edith was a dozen years younger than her husband, and had enjoyed the busy social scene back in England. She succumbed to the charms of the married Apostolos Papadopoulos, who had bought Dafnonda, the neighbouring estate to Achmetaga. Papadopoulos was a compulsive gambler and a playboy who never allowed a pretty woman to pass unnoticed, and was left to his own devices by his philanthropic wife. Edith Noel's affair with him resulted in a son, whom she bore in Paris and named Jim de la Haye. Edith returned to England, was formally divorced from Frank Noel, saw her children infrequently and died in 1893 in insolation, socially disgraced, at the young age of 37. The Viners were a successful mercantile family and her father Thomas Viner had established a coffee plantation in Ceylon, returning to England in the mid-19th century with the fortune he had made from it. There are no apparent lines back to Edward I in his ancestry. I'm unable to further identify Edith's mother Emma. It appears she and Thomas Viner had married in Ceylon, but the register books for the relevant period have not survived. Edith had only two children with Frank Noel before her affair, separation and divorce--daughter Irene Noel-Baker, and a son, Byron Viner Basil Noel (1880-1959).
Crofts Coat of Arms
[Or, three bulls' heads, cabossed sable]

B9) Anne Wentworth (c.1523-1575) m. John Poley of Badley Hall (d. 1589), and had
B10) Susan Poley (c.1545-1604) m. Thomas Crofts of West Stow Hall (c.1540-1612, descended from Edward I), and had
B11) Sir John Crofts of Little Saxham Hall (c.1565-1628) m. Mary Shirley (d. 1649, descended from Edward I), and had
B12) Anne Crofts (c.1593-1638) m. Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Cleveland (see A11 above)

C7) Margery Wentworth (c.1478-1550) m. Sir John Seymour of Wolf Hall (c.1474-1536), and had
C8) Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, Lord Protector (c.1500-1552) m. 2) Anne Stanhope (c.1510-1587, descended from Edward III), and had
C9) Lady Elizabeth Seymour (1550-1602) m. Sir Richard Knightley of Fawsley Hall (1533-1615, descended from Edward I), and had
C10) Sir Seymour Knightley of Norton (1580-1640) m. Dorothy Bedell (d. 1633), and had
C11) Anne Knightley (c.1620-1699) m. Dr. Jonathan Holled of Cottingham (1612-1680), and had
C12) Rev. Knightley Holled of Barby (c.1650-1700) m. Anne Mayne (d. 1730), and had
C13) Anne Holled (c.1680-1766) m. John Smith of Leire (1672-1742), and had
C14) Knightley Smith of Leire (c.1710-1740) m. Darell Jervis (1713-1740), and had
C15) Holled Smith of Normanton Turville Hall (1732-1795) m. Elizabeth Grace (1738-1786), and had
C16) Catherine Smith (1773-1832) m. Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory (see A18 above)

The next post will examine the Edward III descents of Muriel Jane Baird, wife of Byron Noel, maternal uncle of Francis Noel-Baker.

Cheers,                          -------Brad

Friday, May 27, 2016

Descendants of Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory (1775-1853)

"In my foolish notions of right and wrong I have always thought Tom Noel unhappy, or unhappiest in being situated as dependant where by dint of a few words from infallible Church said over his parental congress, he needed not to have recurred to her for tithes instead of the nine remaining parts of ye property." - Lord Byron, December 1822.
2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1745-1815)
[Portrait by Daniel Gardner c.1780]

Rev. Thomas Noel, rector of Kirkby Mallory, is one of the rare instances of an illegitimate child of a peer receiving mention in Burke's Peerage (107th Edn., 2003, p. 2442, sub Lytton). Conceived four months after his father had succeeded as 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough, and born at the end of 1775, Tom lived with his sister Anna Catherine, six years his senior, and their mother Anna Caterina van Loo, the Belgian-born Catholic mistress of Viscount Wentworth, for the first six years of  his life, until his mother's death in 1781. "My chief anxiety is about the poor Children," Viscount Wentworth wrote to his aunt Mary Noel (1725-1802) two days later, "which are truly dear to me, & as fine ones as can be...The Boy I shall educate well, & inculcate into him that his future livelihood must depend on some profession he may chuse." Viscount Wentworth stayed true to his word, sending his son to Rugby School in Warwickshire, where, in his last half-year, his father proudly wrote that Tom had "grown a devilish handsome strapping fellow." In April 1792, Viscount Wentworth sent his son to his own alma mater, Christ Church Oxford, and Tom Noel seems by that point to have decided on the career of a clergyman, for he was baptized in the Anglican church two days prior to his admission.

In the summer of 1795, having completed his third year at Christ Church, Tom Noel accompanied his cousin Sophia Curzon (1779-1849) to Ravensworth Castle in county Durham, the seat of Sir Thomas Liddell, 6th Baronet (1775-1855, later 1st Baron Ravensworth) and his widowed mother. There, Tom and Elizabeth 'Betsy' Liddell, the 21-year-old eldest sister of the baronet, fell in love. Thinking that Viscount Wentworth would settle a generous inheritance on his only son, the dowager Lady Liddell encouraged the romance. "Nothing could make me happier than seeing Tom so very respectably settled & his forming so enviable a connection," Viscount Wentworth wrote to his sister Judith, Lady Milbanke, "but surely I could wish that no Step might be taken without giving time & particularly to the Lady to reflect on future consequences." Once it became clear to Lady Liddell that Viscount Wentworth was both unwilling and unable (he had many debts and his properties were heavily mortgaged) to provide immediately for his son, she insisted that her daughter break off with Tom Noel. Two months later, Viscount Wentworth discovered that his son's "vanity was the only part much hurt by his dismission." Seven months later in May 1796, Tom Noel received his bachelor's degree from Oxford and eloped.
1811 engraving of Normanton Turville Hall, Leicestershire
"Tom has Stole a Match with Kitty Smith" and "must lie in the bed he had made for himself," Viscount Wentworth reported to his sister Judith Milbanke.  Catherine Smith was the 22-year-old daughter of Holled Smith, a Leicestershire attorney who had died the previous summer. Having lost her mother when she was thirteen years old, Catherine, the fourth of five surviving daughters, was a close neighbour to Viscount Wentworth and his son, for Normanton Turville Hall, her father's seat, was less than 5 miles from Kirkby Mallory. Left to her own devices immediately following her father's death, as her only brother Thomas Grace Smith (1770-1812) was distracted with the £33,000 sale of Normanton Turville, Catherine and Tom Noel found sympathy for their secret romance from Catherine's elder sister Susannah (née Smith) Coxe (1768-1836), and were married by her husband Rev. Richard Coxe, Vicar of Bucklebury. Though only recently elevated to the status of landed gentry - Holled Smith hadn't inherited Normanton Turville Hall, he had purchased it in the early 1780s - the Smiths could nevertheless claim descent from the Lord Protector Somerset (and so two lines from Edward III).

Edward III had two sons A1 & B1 (see below)
A1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
A2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
Lord Protector Somerset -
see Generation A8
A3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
A4) Lady Elizabeth Percy (c.1395-1437) m. 1) John, 7th Lord Clifford (1388-1422, descended from Edward I), and had
A5) Mary Clifford (c.1420-by 1458) m. Sir Philip Wentworth of Nettlestead (1424-1464), and had
A6) Sir Henry Wentworth of Nettlestead (1448-1499) m. 1) Anne Say (c.1448-aft.1489), and had
A7) Margery Wentworth (c.1478-1550) m. Sir John Seymour of Wolf Hall (c.1474-1536), and had
A8) Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, Lord Protector (c.1500-1552) m. 2) Anne Stanhope (see B6 below), and had
A9) Lady Elizabeth Seymour (1550-1602) m. Sir Richard Knightley of Fawsley Hall (1533-1615, descended from Edward I), and had
A10) Sir Seymour Knightley of Norton (1580-1640) m. Dorothy Bedell (d. 1633), and had
A11) Anne Knightley (c.1620-1699) m. Dr. Jonathan Holled of Cottingham (1612-1680), and had
A12) Rev. Knightley Holled of Barby (c.1650-1700) m. Anne Mayne (d. 1730), and had
A13) Anne Holled (c.1680-1766) m. John Smith of Leire (1672-1742), and had
A14) Knightley Smith of Leire (c.1710-1740) m. Darell Jervis (1713-1740), and had
A15) Holled Smith of Normanton Turville Hall (1732-1795) m. Elizabeth Grace (1738-1786), and had
A16) Catherine Smith (1773-1832), first wife of Rev. Thomas Noel of Kirkby Mallory
Anne (née Stanhope),
Duchess of Somerset
 -
see Generation B6

B1) Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester (1355-1397) m. Lady Eleanor de Bohun (1365-1399, descended from Edward I), and had
B2) Anne Plantagenet, Countess of Buckingham (1383-1438) m. 3) William Bourchier, 1st Count of Eu (c.1374-1420), and had
B3) William Bourchier, 9th Lord FitzWarin (c.1409-1469) m. 1) Thomasine Hankford (1423-1453), and had
B4) Fulk Bourchier, 10th Lord FitzWarin (1445-1479) m. Elizabeth Dinham (c.1450-1516), and had
B5) Elizabeth Bourchier (c.1478-1557) m. 3) Sir Edward Stanhope of Rampton (1469-1511), and had
B6) Anne Stanhope (c.1510-1587) m. 1) Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (see A8 above)

Likely it was Tom Noel's stepmother Countess Ligonier who smoothed things over between her husband Viscount Wentworth and his impulsive son, for Tom named his firstborn child, which followed nine months after his wedding, 'Mary' in his stepmother's honour. In 1798, Viscount Wentworth was reconciled enough to Tom that he presented him the livings of Kirkby Mallory and Elmsthorpe. Rev. Noel received his Master's degree from Oxford in 1801, and settled down for the next dozen years as the rector of Kirkby Mallory. In 1812, he asked for, and was granted, the honour of performing the wedding ceremony of his cousin Anne Isabella Milbanke, the legal heir of Viscount Wentworth, to Lord Byron. The poet took a ring from his finger and gave it to Rev. Noel as a souvenir of the occasion, but one of Tom's daughters wrote to a friend, "Papa expects something more substantial for the service he has rendered Lord Byron."
Judith Noel, Lady Milbanke
(1751-1822)

Byron's observation of Rev. Noel's unhappiness proved right on the mark. In his later years, Tom was increasingly frustrated by the inheritance situation following his father's death in 1815. To provide for his two illegitimate children Viscount Wentworth stipulated in his will that his Gloucestershire estates were to be sold for payment of his debts and to provide legacies for his children. Judith Milbanke had laboured determinedly for the past two decades to insure that Viscount Wentworth designated her and her only daughter as his legal heirs, and Judith even agreed to her brother's stipulation that she, her husband, her daughter and even her son-in-law Lord Byron all had to legally assume the surname Noel. Judith triumphantly moved into Kirkby Hall immediately on inheriting it, and never left it again. With her usual incapacity for seeing any perspective other than her own, she then legally blocked her brother's executors from selling his Gloucestershire estates. In 1816, Rev. Noel and his sister Mrs. Biscoe, both with large families, sued their father's trustees, Judith, and her husband for a settlement under the terms of their father's will. Not blessed with the several manors and estates of the Milbankes and Noels which Judith had successfully combined, Viscount Wentworth's two children needed the cash he had stipulated for them to help provide for their families, and didn't have the luxury of waiting for property values to increase, which seemed to be Judith's goal in delaying the sale. Judith once referred to Tom's wife Catherine as "a poor timid low-spirited creature," so it's no surprise that when she took possession of Kirkby Hall, Rev. Noel appointed a fellow prelate to perform the clerical duties of the parish, and vacated Kirkby Mallory.
Kirkby Mallory Rectory in late 19th-century
Judith's death in 1822 prompted Rev. Noel's request to Lord Byron to intercede with Lady Byron, the new legal owner of Kirkby Hall, to obtain a promise that, following his death, the living of Kirkby Mallory should be given to one of his sons. Though Annabella, Lady Byron (later 11th Baroness Wentworth) was a far more generous lady of the manor than her mother had been, the damage Judith had caused Rev. Noel ran too deep. He wrote bitterly to Annabella in 1846: "Madam a stranger has afforded me the assistance of the loan of £60 which your silence or contempt on my application denied me, & from which the Consanguinity betwixt us and your ample means derived from my late Father you could so readily afford to his Publicly acknowledged son. Much of his property you are now enjoying had he not been so suddenly seized with paralysis he meant to leave to me & my sister, as He stated to me previous to his leaving Kirkby for London for the purpose of altering his will."

Lady Byron's refusal to loan money to Rev. Noel could have been a result of his own foolish behaviour. After the death of his wife Catherine in 1832, Rev. Noel seems to have moved to Calais, perhaps fleeing creditors. In 1838, at the age of 62, he made a second marriage there, to the 30-year-old Henrietta Fisher, an Englishwoman from Kent, and in 1846, when he was refused the loan by Lady Byron, they had two infant sons. His five surviving children from his first marriage, grown-up and starting families of their own, with the financial support of Lady Byron, were dismayed by their father's second wife and family. Rev. Noel felt betrayed enough by one of his sons, Charles Noel, who had accepted Lady Byron's offer in 1831 to serve as her resident land agent at Kirkby Mallory with an annual income of £100, that he cut him out of his will. Rev. Noel died in Plymouth at the age of 77 in the summer of 1853, leaving dual families: a 45-year-old widow with two young sons, aged 10 and 8, and grown children with families of their own scattered throughout England, Germany and Greece. It's evident that, thanks to the support of Lady Byron, the children of Rev. Noel's first marriage did much better in life than the two young sons of his second marriage. When his widow Henrietta died in Plymouth in 1878, her estate was valued at less than £300. Her elder son Vincent Noel had become a physician, but sadly died of scarlet fever at age 23 while treating an outbreak of it in Plymouth. The younger son Henry Noel, was the only one of Rev. Noel's six sons to follow in his footsteps and become a clergyman. He became rector of a parish in Manchester, and died there in 1893 leaving two sons of his own. The elder, Ternan Noel, a labourer who immigrated to Canada and died in a psychiatric facility, and the younger, Archibald Noel, a bookkeeper in Manchester - a far cry from the lectures at Christ Church and summers at Kirkby Hall and Ravensworth Castle that their grandfather had experienced.
Gatehouse of Christ Church Oxford
Rev. Noel spent the last four decades of his life focused on his father's will and the unfairness of the Wentworth inheritance. The bitterness is completely understandable. Viscount Wentworth spent the last twenty years of his life at Kirkby Mallory with his son Tom the young rector, and the county locals certainly viewed Tom as the natural heir to the manor. The History of Leicester in the Eighteenth Century (1871) even goes so far as to say (pp. 157-8): "The family is now represented by Lord Wentworth, the grandson of the late Lady Noel Byron, and by the male descendants of the last Viscount, who (it is believed) duly contracted a marriage on the Continent with Catherine Louisa Van Loo--a Belgian lady--but not according to the rites of the Church of England. The offspring of this union was Thomas, afterwards the Rev. Thomas Noel, Rector of Kirkby Mallory." If his mother's Catholicism was indeed the only reason keeping Tom from legitimacy, it's a real shame as there's every indication that Tom Noel would have made a worthy peer. His marriage to Elizabeth Liddell would have been a far more brilliant match than his father's to Countess Ligonier, and demonstrates Tom had the ability and personality to surpass his father's limited achievements and influence at court and in the political arena. That Rev. Noel ended his life stewing under the assumption that he had been cheated from an inheritance is sad, for the appointment of Charles Noel as land agent shows that Lady Byron, unlike her obsessively ambitious mother, recognized an importance in keeping the Noel line at Kirkby Mallory.

Charles, the son Rev. Noel felt inclined to cut out from inheritance, was able to reach a state his father never could: forgiveness. He wrote to Lady Byron: "Relating to the will of my late Father I wish to place on record my earnest desire in relation to that document. First I freely forgive the dead. Next I wish to prove to the widow that I cannot in hope of a future world before my eyes use the same weapons in defence...and I trust that I may be enabled to live and die without receiving in any way benefit from my Father's property." That a son engaged in a material career proved more spiritual in the end than a father engaged in a clerical one may not be so unusual among the 19th-century English clergy. Lord Byron deferred to his estranged wife on the matter of Rev. Noel, "she is a better judge of parsons than me."

Rev. THOMAS NOEL, Rector of Kirkby Mallory 1798-1853, b. 28 Dec. 1775 England, bap. 25 Apr. 1792 St Marylebone, London; d. 22 Aug. 1853 Plymouth, Devon, illegitimate son of Thomas Noel, 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1745-1815, descended from Edward III) and Anna Catherina Vanloo (d. 1781); m. 1st 7 May 1796 St Mary Church, Bucklebury, Berkshire, CATHERINE SMITH, b. Claybrooke, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, bap. 21 Aug. 1773 St Mary Church, Lutterworth; d. 11 Mar. 1832 Norris Hill, Hampshire, dau. of Holled Smith of Normanton Turville Hall (1732-1795, descended from Edward III) and Elizabeth Grace (1738-1786), and had issue, five sons and five daughters; m. 2nd 1 Mar. 1838 Town Hall, Calais, France, HENRIETTA ELIZABETH FISHER, b. 27 July 1808 Gravesend, Kent, bap. 28 Jan. 1812 St George Church, Gravesend; d. 27 Aug. 1878 St Stephen-By-Saltish, Cornwall, dau. of Thomas Fisher of Gravesend (d. 1814) and Mary (?)Milgate, and had further issue, two sons.
Town Hall, Calais, France

Issue of Rev. Thomas and Catherine (Smith) Noel:

1) MARY GEORGIANA NOEL, b. 11 Feb. 1797, bap. 11 May 1797 St Peter & St Paul Church, Yattendon, Berkshire; d. unm. 25 Sept. 1815 Malvern, Worcestershire.

2) CATHARINE JUDITH NOEL, b. 6 Apr. 1798, bap. 29 May 1798 St Peter & St Paul Church, Yattendon; d. unm. 19 May 1815 Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire.

3) THOMAS NOEL of Boyne Cottage, Cookham, Berkshire, poet, b. 11 May 1799 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 13 May 1799 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 22 May 1861 Brighton, Sussex; m. 29 Jan. 1831 All Saints Church, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, as her 1st husband, EMILY ANNE HALLIDAY, b. 13 Oct. 1812 Ham Lodge, Surrey, bap. 6 Nov. 1815 All Saints Church, Kingston upon Thames; d. 7 Dec. 1882 Rochdale, Lancashire, yr. dau. of Capt. Francis Alexander Halliday of Ham Lodge (1773-1830, descended from Henry VII) and Anne White (1777-1840), and had issue, two sons and one daughter.

Issue of Thomas and Emily Anne (Halliday) Noel:

3A) THOMAS HALLIDAY NOEL, b. 1845 Boyne Cottage; d. 1859 Brighton.

3B) EMILY ELIZA NOEL, b. 1849 Boyne Cottage; d. 31 Jan. 1934 West Norwood, Surrey; m. 29 June 1869 St Nicholas Church, Brighton, JOHN GEORGE CHARLES SCHULER of West Norwood, language instructor, b. 16 Jan. 1847 Stuttgart, Württemberg, Germany, bap. there 7 Feb. 1847; d. 27 Mar. 1919 West Norwood, son of Johann Georg Schuler of Stuttgart and Friedrike Regine Menninger, and had issue, six sons and four daughters.
Noel of Kirkby Coat of Arms

3C) BYRON BRUCE NOEL of Evenwood, Ockham, Surrey, land agent to Earl of Lovelace, b. 1851 Boyne Cottage; d. 3 Apr. 1909 Evenwood, bur. 8 Apr. 1909 All Saints Church, Ockham;  m. 1874 Kensington, London, AMY ELFORD ADAMS, b. 6 Nov. 1854 Aberdeen, Scotland, bap. 26 Nov. 1854 Old Machar, Aberdeen; d. 1 Mar. 1940 Heathfield House, Brockenhurst, Hampshire, only dau. of Capt. William Elford Adams  of Aberdeen (1822-1856) and Anna Maria Bannerman (1829-1904, descended from James I of Scotland), and had issue, six sons and seven daughters.

4) ROWNEY NOEL [son], b. 20 June 1800 Kirkby Mallory, bap. there same day; d. 25 June 1800 Kirkby Mallory, bur. there same day.

5) JANE NOEL, bap. 31 Aug. 1801 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; bur. there 13 Oct. 1801.

6) Maj. ROBERT RALPH NOEL of Brompton, Middlesex, Leicestershire Regiment Militia, phrenologist, bap. 28 Oct. 1802 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d.s.p. 3 July 1883 Brompton; m. 1838 Germany, LOUISE VON HENNIGEN, b. 1813 Bohemia; d.s.p. 27 Apr. 1885 Brompton.

7) SOPHIA ANNE NOEL, b. 26 July 1805 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 2 June 1876 Richmond, Surrey; m. 20 Aug. 1833 St Martin Church, Bryanston, Dorset, Lt. LIONEL HALLIDAY of St Helier, Jersey, b. 5 Mar. 1803 Ruxbury, St Anne's Hill, Surrey, bap. 2 May 1803 St Peter Church, Chertsey, Surrey; d. 23 Jan. 1846 Dinan, Brittany, France, est son of Capt. Francis Alexander Halliday of Ham Lodge (1773-1830, descended from Henry VII) and Anne White (1777-1840), and had issue, three sons and three daughters.
All Saints Church, Leamington Priors

8) CHARLES NOEL of Leamington Priors, Warwickshire, land agent for Lady Byron, b. 7 June 1809 Kirkby Mallory (twin with sister Anna Frances), bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 7 May 1857 Leamington Priors, bur. 9 May 1857 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; m. 2 June 1836 St Catherine Church, Burbage, Leicestershire, MARY ANNE DYKE, bap. 30 Apr. 1802 St Catherine Church, Burbage; d. 20 Apr. 1857 Leamington Priors, bur. 23 Apr. 1857 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors, dau. of Rev. Jerome Dyke of Burbage (1771-1837) and Mary Sheppard (1775-1826), and had issue, one son and two daughters.

Issue of Charles and Mary Anne (Dyke) Noel:

8A) MARY AUGUSTA NOEL, governess, b. 1837 Kirkby Mallory; living 1861 - further history not known[*1].

8B) CATHERINE EMMA NOEL, bap. 4 Aug. 1838 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; living 1857 - further history not known[*1].

8C) CHARLES EDWARD NOEL of Purbrook Cosham, Hampshire, bap. 24 July 1840 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. unm. 19 May 1876 Portsmouth, Hampshire.

9) ANNA FRANCES NOEL, b. 7 June 1809 Kirkby Mallory (twin with brother Charles), bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. unm. Apr. 1833 Bloomsbury, London, bur. 27 Apr. 1833 St Mary Church, Hanwell, Middlesex.
Edward Henry Noel (1811-1884)

10) EDWARD HENRY NOEL of Hampstead, Middlesex and Achmetaga, Euboea [today Evia], Greece, b. 18 June 1811 Kirkby Mallory, bap. 17 Nov. 1812 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 29 Feb. 1884 Hampstead, bur. 5 Mar. 1884 St Mary Church, Hendon, Middlesex; m. 18 June 1838 St Mary Church, Ealing, Middlesex, FRANCES ISABELLA DOYLE, b. 1819 Bengal, India; d. 5 Nov. 1845 Torquay, Devon, bur. 11 Nov. 1845 St Saviour Church, Tormohun, Devon, dau. of Maj-Gen. Carlo Joseph Doyle (1787-1848) and Chiano Begum (d. by 1820), and had issue, one son and three daughters.

Issue of Edward Henry and Frances Isabella (Smith) Noel:

10A) IRENE SELINA NOEL, b. 22 May 1839 Athens, Greece, bap. 23 May 1839 St Paul Anglican Church, Athens; d. unm. 1855 Piraeus, Attica, Greece, bur. Athens.

10B) EDITH CATHERINE NOEL, b. 25 Oct. 1840 Athens, bap. 25 Dec. 1840 St Paul Anglican Church, Athens; d. in infancy 5 July 1841 Trieste, Italy.

10C) EDGAR CARLO NOEL, b. 12 Feb. 1842 Leamington Priors; d. in infancy there Oct. 1842.

10C) ALICE MARY NOEL, b. 27 Feb. 1843 Leamington Priors, bap. 4 Sept. 1844 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; d.s.p. 10 Apr. 1929 Hampstead; m. 2 July 1885 St John Church, Hampstead, JOHN ARCHIBALD MURRAY MACDONALD of Browns Copse, Heyshott, Sussex, M.P. Bow & Bromley 1892-95, M.P. Falkirk Burghs 1906-18, b. 9 Oct. 1854 Strachur, Argyllshire, Scotland; d.s.p. 16 Jan. 1939 Browns Copse, son of Rev. Hugh Ferguson MacDonald of Strachur (d. 1901) and Christina McIver (d. 1883).
Alice (née Noel) MacDonald
(1843-1929)

10D) FRANCIS EDWARD NOEL of Achmetaga, b. 31 July 1844 Leamington Priors, bap. 4 Sept. 1844 All Saints Church, Leamington Priors; d. 28 Sept. 1919 Achmetaga, bur. there; m. 26 Feb. 1876 St Stephen Kensington, London (divorce c.1885), EDITH ELLEN VINER, bap. 8 Aug. 1856 All Saints Church, St John's Wood, Middlesex; bur. 19 Aug. 1893 St Peter Church, Turnham, Buckinghamshire, yst dau. of Thomas Viner, coffee merchant, of Ceylon & Wavendon Lodge, Woburn, Buckinghamshire (c.1808-1884) and Emma ---, and had issue, one son and one daughter.

Issue of Rev. Thomas and Henrietta Elizabeth (Fisher) Noel:

11) Dr. VINCENT EDMUND NOEL of Plymouth, Devon, physician, bap. 11 June 1843 St Andrew Church, Plymouth; d. unm. 6 Dec. 1866 Plymouth.

12) Rev. HENRY ANTHONY NOEL, Rector of St Clements Longsight, Manchester, Lancashire 1881-93, b. 27 Mar. 1845 Plymouth, bap. 12 June 1845 St Andrew Church, Plymouth; d. 12 May 1893 St Clements Rectory, Longsight; m. 26 May 1869 St Clement Danes, London, JANE ELIZABETH O'NEIL, b. 1842 Rame, Cornwall; d. Dec. 1909 Chorlton, Manchester, bur. 4 Jan. 1910 Southern Cemetery, Chorlton, dau. of Capt. Henry O'Neil of Plymouth (1812-1884) and Mary Cole, and had issue, two sons and one daughter.

Issue of Rev. Henry Anthony and Jane Elizabeth (O'Neil) Noel:

12A) IRENE MAY NOEL, b. Halifax, Yorkshire, bap. 28 Mar. 1870 All Saints Church, Salterhebble, Yorkshire; d. 24 Jan. 1925 Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire; m. 19 Apr. 1894 St Clements Longsight, as his 1st wife, ROBERT ASTLEY HOPWOOD of Manchester, Master Merchant Marines, bap. 3 Nov. 1868 St Philip Hulme, Manchester; d. 1942 Lancashire, est son of Richard Hopwood of Manchester, lithographic printer (1847-1906) and Maria Louisa Robinson (1845-1933), and had issue, two sons and two daughters.

12B) TERNAN OSWALD NOEL of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, labourer, b. 29 Jan. 1873 Banchory, Aberdeenshire, Scotland; d. unm. 11 Apr. 1924 Protestant Hospital for the Insane, Verdun, Quebec.
Protestant Hospital for the Insane, Verdun, Quebec
12C) ARCHIBALD RANDOLPH PERCY NOEL of Manchester, "invoice clerk", bap. 7 Oct. 1877 St Stephen Church, St Stephens by Saltash, Cornwall; d.s.p. 2 Nov. 1940 Levenshulme, Manchester; m. 1 Aug. 1903 St Agnes Church, Birch in Rusholme, Manchester, ANGELINA MAY GREGORY, b. 1875 Manchester; d.s.p. 11 May 1943 Levenshulme, dau. of William Gregory of Manchester, bookkeeper, and Sarah Elizabeth Peers.

[*1] Mary Augusta Noel last appears on record in the 1861 Census as a governess, while her sister Catherine Emma last appears on record in their father Charles Noel's 1857 will. It's possible either or both sisters married, though neither has a readily apparent entry in the England Marriages 1837-1915 Index. Nor is there a readily apparent death entry for either sister in the England Deaths 1837-1915 Index. Administration of the estate of their brother Charles was granted in 1876 to their uncle Robert Ralph Noel, which suggests both sisters had predeceased their brother, though it's also possible one or both had emigrated from England.

The next blogpost will examine the Edward III descents for Francis Noel-Baker, M.P., a descendant of Rev. Thomas Noel.

Cheers,                                   ------Brad

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Edward III Descents for Mary (née Henley), Countess Ligonier (c.1750-1814)

Henley Coat of Arms
[Azure, a lion rampant argent,
crowned with a ducal coronet or,
in a bordure argent, charged
with eight torteauxes
]
It's taking me longer than I had originally thought it would to enter the descendants of the 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough into my database. So far, tracing them has led to a forester in Ontario, Canada, a florist in Philadelphia (both early 20th-century North American immigrants descended from Henry VII), and the wife of a Nobel Peace Prize winner, among several others. They hopefully will make a fascinating series of posts starting early next week. In the meantime, I'll turn in this post from the descendants of the 2nd Viscount Wentworth, to the ancestry of his wife.

"The most liberal & the best of Women My Dearest Mary" is how Viscount Wentworth referred to his wife in a letter he wrote to his sister Lady Milbanke in the summer of 1791. Lady Milbanke, however, whose ambition often out-paced her intelligence, and who, from the evidence of her letters and behaviour, showed symptoms of what today is called anxiety disorder, felt otherwise about her sister-in-law, who outranked her both in birth and title: she blamed her for what she perceived was a coldness from her brother. "It really hurts me very much that my Brother should have so little desire to see my Child," Judith Lady Milbanke whined in a letter to her aunt Mary Noel (1725-1802) in the summer of 1797. The child was Annabella Milbanke, whom Judith had given birth to five years previous when aged 40, and whom the lady was determined to make not only the heiress of the Milbankes but that of the Noels as well. Judith's letter prompted a reprimand from her aunt, an experienced woman who saw people in a far more well-rounded light than her temperamental niece: "I am very sure your Brother loves you as much as he can love anything but his dear Mary...It is not now in any bodys power to do you & yours any Injury, as most of his estate was primarily settled upon you & your heirs by his Marriage Settlement after her...She [Mary] certainly does shew the greatest regard & love for him, & is very good to him in money matters, & you know he was always a dupe to the female he lived with, & when all is said we have all our prejudices."
Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington
(c.1708-1772)

Lady Mary Henley was born about 1750, the third of the five daughters of Robert, 1st Earl of Northington, a cabinet minister who had been high in favour with King George III, receiving both his earldom and the position of Lord Chancellor of England from that monarch. Northington died when Lady Mary was about age 21, and two years later in 1773, she married Edward, Viscount Ligonier, a handsome military officer whose first marriage to the unfaithful Penelope Pitt had ended in a scandalous divorce. Though married over eight years, Mary was unable to provide her husband, promoted to the rank of Major-General in 1775, and created Earl Ligonier of Clonmell the following year, with an heir to succeed to his titles. His premature death in 1782 at the age of 42 left Countess Ligonier a widow in her early 30s, with a sizeable fortune, increased when her brother the 2nd Earl of Northington died childless in 1786, leaving Mary and their other four sisters as his coheirs. Small, delicate and kind, Countess Ligonier enjoyed playing cards and the latest fashions, and fell in love with Thomas Noel, 2nd Viscount Wentworth in the months following her brother's death. He had a tarnished past: he had taken a Catholic mistress while on the continent, with whom he lived for several years in England, fathering two children with her. They had separated before her 1781 death, and he had begun a romance with Lady Anne Lindsay (1750-1825), which when he met Countess Ligonier was still ongoing. When Lady Anne eventually broke off with Viscount Wentworth, he turned to Countess Ligonier, and the 42-year-old Wentworth wed Mary, in her late 30s, in February 1788.

The Henleys were a Somerset family descended from a Marian martyr in Taunton. They were granted arms in 1612 and acquired a dozen properties, mostly small, in south-west Somerset and west Dorset, as well as a couple of manors in Devon. The senior branch, seated at Leigh in the parish of Winsham, Somersetshire, rose less rapidly in rank and wealth than their Hampshire cousins, but was the first to marry into the Edward I bloodline when Henry Henley of Leigh (c.1612-1696) took for his second wife Bridget Bampfylde (d. 1657), from the gentry family long established at Poltimore House in Devon. But the Countess Ligonier sprung from the junior branch of the family, founded by Henry's first cousin Robert Henley of Soper Lane, London (d. 1656) who, by his successive occupation of two immensely lucrative offices, first as a Six Clerk in Chancery, and then as chief clerk of the King’s bench (worth £22,500 by his own account), outstripped the senior line both in wealth and status. Robert Henley acquired considerable property in Somerset, Dorset and Hampshire, besides an ‘adventure’ of 5,500 acres in the fens. Henley bequeathed £10,000 to his second (and namesake) son, Robert Henley (c.1624-1692), together with some houses in Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Cavaliers during the Civil War, at the Restoration, the younger Robert Henley was able to enjoy the reversion to the King’s bench office, worth £4,000 a year. He brought the bloodline of Edward I to his branch of the family when, as a childless widower, he married in February 1663, Katherine, the fifth of the nine daughters of Anthony Hungerford of Fairleigh Castle. Her father having died five years prior in 1657, it was Katherine's widowed mother, Rachel (née Jones) Hungerford, who consented to the match. What the Henleys lacked in pedigree was more than made up for in financial stability. Money ran through the hands of Katherine's eldest brother Sir Edward Hungerford (1632-1711), the new family head, like water--at one point he is said to have paid 500 guineas for a wig--so it must have been a relief to him, as well as to his mother, that Katherine was marrying a man so financially well-off. Though Katherine's marriage portion could not have been large, she brought to her husband a lineage that stretched back centuries: the Hungerfords could trace their line back to the 12th century, had held a barony during the tumultuous 15th century, and in 1663 could still claim the status of the leading family in Wiltshire. In addition, Katherine's father Anthony Hungerford had inherited from his childless elder brother, the magnificent Farleigh Castle in Somersetshire. Robert Henley celebrated his marriage into the Hungerford family by taking one of his properties, The Grange, a modest house in the parish of Northington, Hampshire, and turning it into an impressive four storey red brick residence which he made his chief seat. When he died in 1692, Robert Henley left his son and heir Anthony an inheritance said to be worth £3,000 per year.
The Grange, in Northington, Hampshire
With no children of her own, Countess Ligonier was able to bestow generosity on her new husband and his family: her fortune was able to help pay off most of Viscount Wentworth's debts, she was attentive to his spinster aunt Mary Noel, and accepting and supportive of her illegitimate stepchildren. Though she apparently lacked warmth (General Bowater, an old family friend of the Noels, referred to her as "almost to an Icycle" in 1805), Countess Ligonier earned the devotion of her husband, who was inconsolable at her death in 1814, and followed her to the grave less than a year later.

1st Earl Ligonier of Clonmell
(c.1740-1782)
Lady MARY HENLEY, b. c.1650; d.s.p. 29 June 1814 Kirkby Hall, Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire, bur. All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, 3rd dau. of Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington (c.1708-1772 - see A14 below) and Jane Husband (1716-1787 - see B15 below); m. 1st 14 Dec. 1773, as his 2nd wife, EDWARD, 1st Earl LIGONIER of Clonmell, b. c.1740; d.s.p. 14 June 1782, only son (illegitimate) of Col. Francis Augustus Ligonier (1683-1746) and Anne (Freeman) Murray; m. 2nd 2 Feb. 1788 Mayfair, London, THOMAS NOEL, 2nd Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough, b. 18 Nov. 1745 Kirkby Hall, bap. 21 Dec. 1745 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory; d. 17 Apr. 1815 Portman Square, London, bur. 28 Apr. 1815 All Saints Church, Kirkby Mallory, only son of Edward Noel, 1st Viscount Wentworth of Wellesborough (1715-1774, descended from Edward III) and Judith Lamb (1725-1761).

Mary, Countess Ligonier has several lines of descent from Edward III. The nine lines that are through his granddaughter Joan (née Beaufort), Countess of Westmorland, are as follows.

Edward III had a 3rd surv son
Eleanor (née Neville),
Countess of Northumberland

- see Generation A3
A1) John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340-1399) m. 3) Katherine Roet (c.1350-1403), and had
A2) Lady Joan Beaufort (1377-1440) m. twice, and had three daus A3, C3 & I3 and three sons D3, F3 & H3 (see below)
A3) Lady Eleanor Neville, by 2nd husband (1403-1472) m. 2) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455, descended from Edward III), and had
A4) Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421-1461) m. Eleanor Poynings (1428-1484, descended from Edward I), and had
A5) Lady Margaret Percy (b. c.1447) m. Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (see C6 below), and had
A6) Elizabeth Gascoigne (c.1480-1559) m. Sir George Tailboys of South Kyme (1467-1538, descended from Edward I), and had two daus A7 and B7 (see below)
A7) Elizabeth Tailboys (b. c.1497) m. Sir Christopher Willoughby of Parham Hall (d. by 1540, descended from Edward I), and had
A8) Anne Willoughby (c.1517-1586) m. Edmund Hall of Greatford (by 1519-1592, descended from Edward I), and had
A9) Rachel Hall (c.1549-1629) m. Sir Arthur Hopton of Witham Friary (c.1545-1607, descended from Edward I), and had
A10) Frances Hopton (c.1592-1642) m. 1) Rice Jones of Asthall House (d. 1615), and had
A11) Rachel Jones (c.1612-1680) m. Anthony Hungerford of Fairleigh Castle (1607-1657, descended from Edward I), and had
Anthony Henley -
see Generation A13
A12) KATHERINE HUNGERFORD, b. Bourton Place, Black Bourton, Oxfordshire, bap. 11 June 1642 St Mary Church, Black Bourton; d. by 1674; m. 12 Feb. 1663 St Mary le Strand, London, as his 2nd wife, Sir ROBERT HENLEY of The Grange, Northington, Hampshire, b. 1631; d. 15 Dec. 1692, bur. St John Church, Northington, 2nd son of Robert Henley of London (1591-1656) and his 2nd wife Anne Eldred, and had
A13) ANTHONY HENLEY of The Grange, b. 1667; d. Aug. 1711; m. 8 Feb. 1700, as her 1st husband, MARY BERTIE (see D12 below), and had
A14) ROBERT HENLEY, 1st Earl of Northington, b. c.1708; d. 14 Jan. 1772 The Grange, bur. St John Church, Northington; m. 19 Nov. 1743 St George Hanover Square, London, JANE HUBAND (see B15 below), and had
A15) Lady MARY HENLEY (c.1750-1814 - see details above), Countess Ligonier

B7) Anne Tailboys (b. c.1510) m. 1) Sir Edward Dymoke of Scrivelsby Court (by 1508-1567, descended from Edward I), and had
B8) Sir Robert Dymoke of Scrivelsby Court (c.1530-1580) m. Lady Bridget Fiennes de Clinton (b. c.1535, descended from Edward I), and had
B9) Margaret Dymoke (d. aft.1611) m. Sir Vincent Fulnetby of Fulnetby Hall (d. 1623, descended from Edward I), and had
Amcotts Coat of Arms
B10) Jane Fulnetby (c.1575-1628) m. Sir Richard Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (c.1564-1629), and had
B11) William Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (c.1593-1639) m. Anne Bennett (b. c.1600), and had
B12) John Amcotts of Aisthorpe Hall (1630-1655) m. Rhoda Hussey (1635-1659), and had
B13) Rhoda Amcotts (1653-1692) m. Sir Thomas Broughton, 2nd Baronet of Broughton (see I12 below), and had
B14) Rhoda Broughton (1680-1745) m. Sir John Huband, 2nd Baronet of Ipsley (see E11 below), and had
B15) JANE HUBAND, b. Jan. 1716 Ipsley Court, Warwickshire, bap. 3 Feb. 1716 St Peter Church, Ipsley; d. 12 Sept. 1787 Grosvenor Square, London, bur. St John Church, Northington; m. 19 Nov. 1743 St George Hanover Square, ROBERT HENLEY, 1st Earl of Worthington (see A14 above)

C3) Mary Ferrers, by 1st husband (1394-1458) m. Sir Ralph Neville of Oversley (1395-1458, descended from Edward I), and had
C4) John Neville of Oversley (c.1415-1482) m. Elizabeth Newmarch (b. 1415), and had
C5) Joan Neville (c.1434-bef.1482) m. 1) Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (c.1428-1463), and had
C6) Sir William Gascoigne of Gawthorpe Hall (c.1450-1487) m. Lady Margaret Percy (see A5 above)

D3) Edward Neville, 3rd Lord Abergavenny, by 2nd husband (c.1417-1476) m. twice, and had a dau D4 and a son E4 (see below)
D4) Margaret Neville, by 2nd wife (c.1455-1506) m. John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (c.1447-1512, descended from Edward I), and had
D5) Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham (c.1475-1529) m. 1) Dorothy Heydon (c.1477-by 1515), and had
Sir Thomas Wyatt -
see Generation D7
D6) Elizabeth Brooke (c.1503-1560) m. Sir Thomas Wyatt of Allington Castle (c.1503-1542), and had
D7) Sir Thomas Wyatt of Allington Castle (by 1521-1554) m. Jane Haute (d. aft.1595), and had
D8) Anne Wyatt (1542-1592) m. Roger Twysden of Roydon Hall (1542-1603), and had
D9) Jane Twysden (1572-1639) m. Sir William Monyns, 1st Baronet of Waldershare (c.1570-1643), and had
D10) Sir Edward Monyns, 2nd Baronet of Waldershare (c.1600-1663) m. Elizabeth Style (d. 1703), and had
D11) Susan Monyns (1651-1697) m. Hon. Peregrine Bertie of Waldershare (c.1634-1701, descended from Edward I), and had
D12) MARY BERTIE, b. c.1679; d. aft.1719; m. 1st 8 Feb. 1700, ANTHONY HENLEY of The Grange (see A13 above)

E4) George Neville, 4th Lord Abergavenny, by 1st wife (1440-1492) m. 1) Margaret Fenne (c.1444-1485), and had
E5) Sir Edward Neville of Addington Park (by1482-1538) m. Eleanor Windsor (d. 1531, descended from Ed
Huband Coat of Arms
ward I), and had
E6) Edward Neville, 7th Lord Abergavenny (c.1518-1589) m. 1) Katharine Brome (b. c.1530), and had
E7) Grissell Neville (c.1565-by 1614) m. Sir Henry Poole of Oaksey (1564-1632, descended from Edward I), and had
E8) Elizabeth Poole (c.1590-1622) m. John Huband of Ipsley Court (c.1585-1650), and had
E9) Ralph Huband of Ipsley Court (1613-1651) m. Anne Tevery (d. 1672), and had
E10) Sir John Huband, 1st Baronet of Ipsley (c.1649-1710) m. Jane Paulet (see F11 below), and had
E11) Sir John Huband, 2nd Baronet of Ipsley (c.1675-1717) m. Rhoda Broughton (see B14 above)

F3) Richard Neville, 1st Earl of Salisbury, by 2nd husband (c.1398-1460) m. Lady Alice Montagu (1406-1462, descended from Edward I), and had a dau F4 and a son G4 (see below)
F4) Lady Katherine Neville (c.1442-1504) m. 1) William Bonville, 6th Lord Harington (1442-1460, descended from Edward I), and had
F5) Cecily Bonville (1460-1529) m. 1) Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset (c.1456-1501, descended from Edward I), and had
Cecily (née Bonville),
Marchioness of Dorset
-
see Generation F5
F6) Lady Dorothy Grey (c.1485-1553) m. 1) Robert, 2nd Lord Willoughby of Broke (1472-1521), and had
F7) Elizabeth Willoughby (c.1510-by 1552) m. John Paulet, 2nd Marquess of Winchester (c.1510-1576, descended from Edward I), and had
F8) William Paulet, 3rd Marquess of Winchester (c.1532-1598) m. Agnes Howard (c.1534-1601, descended from Edward I), and had
F9) William Paulet, 4th Marquess of Winchester (c.1552-1629) m. Lady Lucy Cecil (see G9 below), and had
F10) Lord Charles Paulet of Abbotts Ann (c.1610-1655) m. Elizabeth (---), and had
F11) Jane Paulet m. 2) Sir John Huband, 1st Baronet of Ipsley (see E10 above)

G4) John Neville, Marquess of Montagu (c.1431-1471) m. Isabel Ingaldesthorpe (1441-1476, descended from Edward I), and had
G5) Lady Lucy Neville (1468-1534) m. 2) Sir Anthony Browne of Calais (1443-1506, descended from Edward I), and had
G6) Elizabeth Browne (c.1502-1565) m. Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester (c.1496-1549, descended from Edward III), and had
Dorothy (née Neville),
Countess of Exeter
-
see Generation G8
G7) Lady Lucy Somerset (1523-1583) m. John Neville, 4th Lord Latimer (see H7 below), and had
G8) Dorothy Neville (1548-1609) m. Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter (1542-1623), and had
G9) Lady Lucy Cecil (1568-1614) m. William Paulet, 4th Marquess of Winchester (see F9 above)

H3) George Neville, 1st Lord Latimer, by 2nd husband (c.1411-1469) m. Lady Elizabeth Beauchamp (c.1411-1480, descended from Edward I), and had
H4) Sir Henry Neville, Heir of Latimer (c.1435-1469) m. Joan Bourchier (c.1448-1470, descended from Edward III), and had
H5) Richard Neville, 2nd Lord Latimer (1468-1530) m. 1) Anne Stafford (d. by 1521), and had
H6) John Neville, 3rd Lord Latimer (1493-1543) m. 1) Dorothy Vere (c.1500-1526, descended from Edward I), and had
H7) John Neville, 4th Lord Latimer (1520-1577) m. Lady Lucy Somerset (see G7 above)

I3) Lady Anne Neville, by 2nd husband (c.1408-1480) m. 1) Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of 
Buckingham (1402-1460, descended from Edward III), and had
I4) Humphrey, Earl of Stafford (c.1425-1458) m. Lady Margaret Beaufort (c.1437-1474, descended from Edward III), and had
2nd Duke of Buckingham
- see Generation I5
I5) Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (1455-1483) m. Lady Katherine Woodville (c.1458-1497), and had
I6) Lady Elizabeth Stafford (c.1481-by 1532) m. Robert Radcliffe, 1st Earl of Sussex (c.1483-1542, descended from Edward I), and had
I7) Sir Humphrey Radcliffe of Elstow (1509-1566) m. Isabel Harvey (1518-1594), and had
I8) Frances Radcliffe (c.1547-by 1584) m. Henry Cheke of Elstow (c.1548-1586), and had
I9) Mary Cheke (b. c.1575) m. Thomas Spencer of Claverdon (c.1570-1630), and had
I10) Alice Spencer (c.1594-1648) m. Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote Hall (1585-1640, descended from Edward I), and had
I11) Bridget Lucy (1621-1692) m. Sir Brian Broughton, 1st Baronet of Broughton (1618-1708), and had
I12) Sir Thomas Broughton, 2nd Baronet of Broughton (c.1650-1710) m. Rhoda Amcotts (see B13 above)

I will be very busy this weekend in Victoria, helping my partner out with a family project, but hope to have the next blogpost, on the children of Rev. Thomas Noel (Countess Ligonier's illegitimate stepson), and the Edward III descent of his first wife, posted Monday or Tuesday.

Cheers,                                -----Brad