Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Ruvigny Addition: Exeter Descent for Elizabeth (née Crowley), Countess of Ashburnham (1727-1781)

Elizabeth (née Crowley), Countess of Ashburnham
(1727-1781)
John Ashburnham lost his mother in 1731 when he was only six years old. Six years later when his father died, the 12-year-old John succeeded to the earldom of Ashburnham and several estates, chief of which was Ashburnham Place in Sussex, the seat of the family for six hundred years, since the early 12th-century. The young earl still had his maternal grandfather Henry Grey, Duke of Kent, to help guide his adolescence, until that peer's death in 1740 when John was sixteen. In 1743, John's uncle--his father's only surviving brother--Hon. Bertram Ashburnham, died unmarried, making the 19-year-old earl literally the last surviving male of the Ashburnham line. The 1st Earl of Ashburnham had been a successful courtier, a Lord of the Bedchamber to Frederick, Prince of Wales, and the young second earl followed in his father's footsteps, becoming a Lord of the Bedchamber to King George II in 1748 at age 24. Though the entire future of the Ashburnham line and title depended on John producing a legitimate male heir, he took his time to find a wife. It wasn't until 1756, when he was age 31, that he finally did marry. Undoubtedly the young second earl of Ashburnham could have chosen a wife from among dozens of ladies at court, so it's interesting that the lady he settled on wasn't even from among the peerage. She was Elizabeth Crowley, the younger daughter of a deceased politician, and she was rich ... very rich. Through his bride, the earl of Ashburnham gained a fortune of £200,000, as well as a formidable mother-in-law, Theodosia (née Gascoigne) Crowley, arguably the most remarkable businesswoman of the mid-eighteenth century, who, for the nearly three decades since her husband's 1728 death, had been overseeing, as his widow, the administration of his family business, the largest ironworks in Europe.
Crowley of Stourbridge Coat of Arms
[Vert, on a chevron or, a star of sixteen points
between two roses gules
]

When Ambrose Crowley, a nailmaker in a small village near Stourbridge, in Worcestershire, died in 1680, he possessed a six-room house, workshop and barn. His namesake son, Ambrose Crowley II, moved to the town proper, became a Quaker, and prospered as an ironmonger (i.e., a wholesaler of iron). His business in Stourbridge gained an international reputation, and he expanded beyond the Midlands to include enterprises in Wales and urban waterworks in Devon. Under the tenure of his eldest son, a third Ambrose Crowley (1658-1713), the family developed a vast nationwide organization, with a massive ironworks located in the Valley of the Derwent in county Durham, near Newcastle, offices in London, and a warehouse and transportation network all over Britain. This was enough to earn Ambrose Crowley III fame, a seat in the House of Commons, and a knighthood [Anthony F.C. Wallace, The Social Context of Innovation: Bureaucrats, Families, and Heroes in the Early Industrial Revolution, As Foreseen in Bacon's New Atlantis, 2003, pp. 72-75]. When Sir Ambrose died in 1713, his 24-year-old only son John Crowley took over the Crowley Iron Works, worth well over £100,000. Two years later, he married Theodosia, the only surviving daughter of Rev. Joseph Gascoigne, vicar of Enfield, a London suburb. When her mother died in 1726, it was arranged between Theodosia Crowley and her wealthy only surviving brother Joseph Gascoigne Nightingale, for her to inherit Barking Hall in Suffolk, the seat of their mother's family the Theobalds. John Crowley died twelve years after his marriage, leaving the 34-year-old Theodosia with six children, aged nine to less than a year. For the next five decades, Theodosia took over the administration of Crowley Iron Works. She was joined by her two sons when they reached maturity, though both died unmarried at age 35. Indeed, Theodosia would outlive all six of her children, as the monument to her and her children in Barking Church sadly points out: "Mrs. Theodosia Crowley, widow of the said John Crowley, Esq., who survived all her children, and lived to a great age, an exemplary pattern of virtue and goodness, blest with a most amiable disposition, her constant wish was to make others happy, being generous to private distress, and very charitable to the Poor, no one was more esteemed while living, or more lamented at her death." 
Ruvigny's 1907 account of the Descendants of Anne (Nightingale) Theobald
Ruvigny, on p. 434 of his Exeter volume, makes it clear that he wasn't certain if there were any descendants of Sir Francis and Anne (Nightingale) Theobald living at the beginning of the 20th century. It is only through that couple's great-granddaughter Elizabeth (née Crowley), Countess of Ashburnham, that there were descendants living in Ruvigny's lifetime, and indeed continuing to the present day, including the famous Mitford sisters of the 20th century. Following is an elaboration and continuation of Ruvigny's account, along with the descent of Elizabeth, countess of Ashburnham, from Edward III through Anne, Duchess of Exeter.

ANNE NIGHTINGALE, b. 1625; d. 25 Oct. 1668, bur. St Mary Church, Barking, Suffolk, only dau. of Robert Nightingale, Heir of Newport Pond (c.1605-1639, descended from Edward I) and Theodosia Chester (c.1605-1683, descended from Edward III - see Generation 11 below); m. 7 Aug. 1649 St Mary Colechurch, London, her stepbrother, Sir FRANCIS THEOBALD of Barking Hall, Suffolk, bap. 13 Mar. 1621 St Mary Aldermanbury, London; bur. 1 Feb. 1679 St Mary Church, Barking, son of Francis Theobald of Barking Hall (d. 1652) and his 1st wife Sarah Crompton (d. 1631), and had issue, two sons and three daughters.
Theobald of Barking Coat of Arms

Issue of Anne (Nightingale) and Sir Francis Theobald:

1) THEODOSIA THEOBALD, bap. 12 Aug. 1651 St Mary Church, Barking; d. unknown; (?)m. 1676 All Saints Church, Colchester, Essex, WILLIAM CLENCH - further history not known[*1]

2) FRANCIS THEOBALD, Heir of Barking Hall, b. 28 Aug. 1654 Barking Hall, bap. 7 Sept. 1654 St Mary Church, Barking; d. unm., bur. there 19 Sept. 1676.

3) ANNE THEOBALD, b. 16 Feb. 1655 Barking Hall, bap. 21 Feb. 1655 St Mary Church, Barking; d. 9 Oct. 1726, bur. 18 Oct. 1726 St Andrew Church, Enfield, Middlesex; m. 19 June 1687 St Mildred Bread Street, London, Dr. JOSEPH GASCOIGNE, Vicar of Enfield 1681-1721, b. Cambridge, bap. 19 Feb. 1643 Holy Trinity Church, Cambridge; d. 11 July 1721 Rectory House, Enfield, bur. 18 July 1721 St Andrew Church, Enfield, son of Joseph Gascoigne of Cambridge, cordwainer (d. 1666) and Jane --- (d. 1666)[*2], and had issue, four sons and three daughters.
St Andrew Church, Enfield, Middlesex

Issue of Anne (Theobald) and Dr. Joseph Gascoigne:

3A) ANNE GASCOIGNE, bap. 19 June 1688 St Andrew Church, Enfield; bur. there 14 July 1691.

3B) THEOBALD GASCOIGNE of Barking Hall, bap. 25 Sept. 1689 St Andrew Church, Enfield; d. unm. 16 Oct. 1714, bur. 21 Oct. 1714 St Mary Church, Barking.

3C) SARAH GASCOIGNE, bap. 2 Oct. 1690 St Andrew Church, Enfield; bur. there 24 Apr. 1693.

3D) JOSEPH GASCOIGNE, bap. 14 June 1692 St Andrew Church, Enfield; bur. there 9 Feb. 1694.

3E) THEODOSIA GASCOIGNE, bap. 28 Sept. 1693 St Andrew Church, Enfield; d. 7 May 1782 Grosvenor Square, London, bur. 15 May 1782 St Mary Church, Barking; m. 15 Dec. 1715 St Andrew Church, Enfield, JOHN CROWLEY of Barking Hall, M.P. Okehampton 1722-27, Queensborough 1727-28, b. 27 June 1689 Chadwick, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire; d. 2 Jan. 1728, bur. 14 Jan. 1728 St Mary Church, Barking, only son of Sir Ambrose Crowley of Greenwich (1658-1713) and Mary Owen (d. 1727), and had issue, two sons and four daughters.

Issue of Theodosia (Gascoigne) and John Crowley:

3E1) AMBROSE CROWLEY of Barking Hall, b. 15 Aug. 1718 Greenwich, Kent, bap. 29 Sept. 1718 St Alfege Church, Greenwich; d. unm. 22 May 1754, bur. 1 June 1754 St Mary Church, Barking.

3E2) JOHN CROWLEY of Barking Hall, bap. 3 Mar. 1720 All Hallows the Less, London; d. unm., bur. 13 July 1755 St Mary Church, Barking.

3E3) MARY CROWLEY, bap. 2 Apr. 1721 All Hallows the Less, London; d.s.p. 27 Feb. 1746, bur. St Peter & St Paul Church, Shelford, Nottinghamshire; m. 29 May 1745, as his 2nd wife, Hon. Sir WILLIAM STANHOPE of Eythrope, Buckinghamshire, M.P. Buckinghamshire 1727-68, b. 20 June 1702 London, bap. 29 July 1702 St Clement Danes, London; d. 7 May 1772 Dijon, Burgundy, France, 2nd son of Philip Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Chesterfield (1673-1726, descended from Edward III) and Lady Elizabeth Savile (c.1673-1708, descended from Edward III).
Boone of Lee Place Coat of Arms

3E4) ANNE CROWLEY, bap. 5 Aug. 1722 St Alfege Church, Greenwich; d. young 17 Nov. 1734.

3E5) THEODOSIA CROWLEY, bap. 27 Dec. 1723 All Hallows the Less, London; d. 9 Jan. 1765 Bath, Somersetshire, bur. St Mary Church, Barking; m. 8 Dec. 1762 St George Hanover Square, London, as his 1st wife, CHARLES BOONE of Lee Place, Kent, M.P. Castle Rising 1757-68, 1784-96, Ashburton 1768-84, b. c.1729; d. 3 Mar. 1819, son of Charles Boone of Rook's Nest, Surrey, M.P. Ludgershall 1727-34 (d. 1735) and his 2nd wife Mary Garth, and had issue, one daughter.

Issue of Theodosia (Crowley) and Charles Boone:

3E5A) THEODOSIA BOONE, bap. 11 July 1764 St George Hanover Square; d. unm., bur. 9 June 1781 St Mary Church, Barking.
2nd Earl of Ashburnham
(1724-1812)

3E6) ELIZABETH CROWLEY, bap. 17 Mar. 1727 All Hallows the Less, London; d. 5 Feb. 1781 Bath, bur. 17 Feb. 1781 St James Church, Ashburnham, Sussex; m. 28 June 1756 St George Hanover Square, JOHN ASHBURNHAM, 2nd Earl of Ashburnham, b. 30 Oct. 1724; d. 8 Apr. 1812 Ashburnham House, Hay Hill, Mayfair, London, bur. 18 Apr. 1812 St James Church, Ashburnham, only son of John Ashburnham, 1st Earl of Ashburnham (1687-1737, descended from Edward III) and his 3rd wife Lady Jemima Grey (1699-1731, descended from Edward III0, and had issue, two sons and four daughters.

3F) JOSEPH GASCOIGNE [later NIGHTINGALE] of Enfield, Middlesex, M.P. Stafford 1727-34, b. Rectory House, Enfield, bap. 19 Dec. 1695 St Andrew Church, Enfield; d. 16 July 1752 Rectory House, Enfield, bur. 25 July 1752 Westminster Abbey; m. 24 June 1725 St George Hanover Square, London, Lady ELIZABETH SHIRLEY, bap. 26 Oct. 1703 St Mary Church, Nantwich, Cheshire; d. 17 Aug. 1731 London, bur. 26 Aug. 1731 Westminster Abbey, est dau. of Washington Shirley, 2nd Earl Ferrers (1677-1729, descended from Edward III) and Mary Levinge (1684-1740), and had issue, three sons and one daughter.

3G) ROBERT GASCOIGNE [later NIGHTINGALE] of Enfield, designated heir of his mother's first cousin Sir Robert Nightingale, 5th Baronet of Newport Pond July 1722, b. 27 Feb. 1698 Rectory House, Enfield, bap. 24 Mar. 1698 St Andrew Church, Enfield, d. unm. (of smallpox) 2 Nov. 1722, bur. 8 Nov. 1722 St Andrew Church, Enfield.

4) ROBERT THEOBALD of Barking Hall, b. 21 Jan. 1658 Barking Hall, bap. 22 Jan. 1658 St Mary Church, Barking; d. unm., bur. 28 Oct. 1690 St Mary Church, Barking.

5) SARAH THEOBALD, b. 20 Aug. 1660 Barking Hall, bap. same day; d. unm., bur. 29 Mar. 1688 St Mary Church, Barking.
St Mary Church, Barking, Suffolk

[*1] All that William C. Pearson, in his 1892 'Pedigree of Theobald of Barking Hall, &c.' in East Anglian Volume 4, says of Theodosia Theobald is that she "Prob[ably] died young." In the Boyd's Marriage Indexes, 1538-1850 (accessed through Find My Past), there is a marriage of Theodosia Theobald to William Clench in 1676 at All Saints Colchester, Essex. This would have to refer to the Theodosia Theobald baptized in 1651, as we know her twice-widowed grandmother Theodosia (Chester) (Nightingale) Theobald did not remarry after the death of her second husband. I can find nothing further online regarding William Clench or his wife Theodosia, though hopefully the entry in the original parish register would shed further light. It's very likely, even if she did marry William Clench, that Theodosia (née Theobald) died without surviving issue.

[*2] Dr. Joseph Gascoigne's father Joseph Gascoigne was a cordwainer (maker of high-quality leather boots and shoes), churchwarden and parish councillor who had a house with yard and gardens in Shoemakers Row, Holy Trinity Parish, Cambridge, and a booth at Stourbridge Fair. A burgess of the city, Joseph Sr. died of the plague in September 1666, followed by his wife Joan two weeks later [Evelyn Lord, The Great Plague: A People's History, 2014, pp. 120-21]. These Gascoignes bore the same arms as the Yorkshire gentry family seated at Gawthorpe Hall, but exactly how Joseph Gascoigne the Cambridge cordwainer descended from that family is not clear.

Edward III had a second surviving son,
Anne, Duchess of Exeter -
see Generation 6
1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
3) Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March (1374-1398) m. Lady Alianore Holland (1370-1405, descended from Edward I), and had
4) Lady Anne Mortimer (1388-1411) m. Richard of York, 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385-1415, descended from Edward III), and had
5) Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (1411-1460) m. Lady Cecily Neville (1415-1495, descended from Edward III), and had
6) Anne Plantagenet, Duchess of Exeter (1439-1476) m. 2) Sir Thomas St Leger (by 1438-1483), and had
7) Lady Anne St Leger (1475-1526) m. George Manners, 11th Lord Ros (1470-1513, descended from Edward I), and had
8) Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland (c.1497-1543) m. 2) Eleanor Paston (c.1505-1551, descended from Edward I), and had
9) Lady Katherine Manners (c.1540-1573) m. Henry Capell of Hadham Hall (c.1533-1588, descended from Edward I), and had
10) ANNE CAPELL, b. 8 June 1566 Rayne Hall, Essex, bap. 13 June 1566 All Saints Church, Rayne; d. Mar. 1642 (will dated 12 Mar., proved 26 Mar. 1642); m. 30 July 1587 St Cecilia Church, Little Hadham, Essex, Sir ROBERT CHESTER of Royston Priory, Hertfordshire, b. 30 June 1566; d. 3 May 1640, son of Edward Chester of Royston Priory and Katherine Granado, and had
11) THEODOSIA CHESTER, b. c.1605; bur. 1 Oct. 1683 St Mary Church, Barking, Suffolk; m. 1st [*3], ROBERT NIGHTINGALE, Heir of Newport Pond, Essex, b. c.1605; d. 30 Apr. 1639, son of Sir Thomas Nightingale, 1st Baronet of Newport Pond (d. 1645) and his 1st wife Millicent Clerke (d. by 1614, descended from Edward I), and had
Gascoigne Coat of Arms
12) Anne Nightingale (1625-1668-see details above) m. Sir Francis Theobald of Barking Hall (1621-1679), and had
13) Anne Theobald (1655-1726-see details above) m. Dr. Joseph Gascoigne of Enfield (1643-1721), and had
14) Theodosia Gascoigne (1693-1782-see details above) m. John Crowley of Barking Hall (1689-1728), and had
15) Elizabeth Crowley (1727-1781-see details above) m. John, 2nd Earl of Ashburnham

[*3] Theodosia (Chester) Nightingale m. 2nd 1 July 1640 St Margaret Church, Westminster, as his 2nd wife, Francis Theobald of Barking Hall, bur. 3 Feb. 1653 St Mary Church, Barking, who, by his first wife, was the father of Sir Francis Theobald of Barking Hall (see Generation 12 above).

The next blogpost will examine the Edward III descents behind Dorothy (née Shafto), Countess of Lisburne.

Cheers,                      ----Brad

Monday, August 22, 2016

Ruvigny Elaboration: Essex Descent for Elizabeth (née Nightingale), Lady Lisburne (1731-1755)

Tomb of Joseph and Lady Elizabeth Nightingale
in Westminster Abbey
In Westminster Abbey, within its St Michael Chapel, stands what is arguably the most dramatic of the Abbey's hundreds of tombs. Sculpted by Louis Francois Roubiliac, it has haunted visitors for over two hundred fifty years. American-born Victorian-era genealogist Joseph Lemuel Chester, in his 1876 work The Marriage, Baptismal, and Burial Registers of the Collegiate Church or Abbey of St. Peter, Westminster, stated (p. 333 n. 6) that the tomb "is considered the gem of the Abbey, and probably would, if in a church at Rome, become the object of many a pilgrimage." His fellow American writer Washington Irving declared the tomb "among the most renowned achievements of modern art." The tomb depicts Death as a skeleton aiming a spear at the figure of a lady as her distraught husband, with one protective arm around her, attempts to ward off Death with the other. One legend has a robber breaking into the Abbey one night, and fleeing in terror when coming upon the tomb in the moonlight.

The story behind the couple commemorated by the tomb is equally dramatic. Joseph Gascoigne was the second son of a clergyman, the vicar of the London suburb of Enfield, Middlesex. He was sent to Trinity College Cambridge in 1712 at age 17, but a sudden series of deaths left him extremely wealthy. First was that of his elder brother Theobald Gascoigne in 1714, which brought Joseph the manor of Barking Hall in Suffolk, the seat of his mother's family, that had come to her when her last surviving brother died unmarried in 1690. In 1721, Joseph became head of the family at age 25 when his father died. A year later, in July 1722, his first cousin Sir Robert Nightingale, 5th Baronet, died designating Joseph's younger brother Robert Gascoigne as heir to the Nightingale estates, chief of which was Newport Pond in Essex, with the stipulation that Robert Gascoigne must assume the name and arms of Nightingale. But a mere three months afterwards, on 2 November 1722, Robert Gascoigne died at age 24 of smallpox. Anne (née Theobald) Gascoigne saw to it that her only surviving son Joseph received the Nightingale inheritance in place of his brother, and Joseph assumed that surname, and an estate worth close to £300,000 a year. The 27-year-old Joseph was now one of the most eligible bachelors in London, and his mother lived long enough to see him make a prestigious marriage to the 21-year-old Lady Elizabeth Shirley, eldest of the three daughters of the 2nd Earl Ferrers. It was through his influential father-in-law that Joseph was first returned to Parliament for Stafford in 1727, and when his first child, a son, was born at the end of that year, Joseph and his wife Lady Elizabeth gave him the name of her father the earl.
Nightingale Coat of Arms
[Per pale ermine and gules, a rose
counterchanged
]

Death continued to haunt the wealthy young couple. Joseph's mother had died in 1726, and Earl Ferrers died in April 1729 when his daughter was eight months pregnant with her second child, another son. A third son arrived the next year, with yet another pregnancy following a few months later. It was this fourth pregnancy that would prove fatal to Lady Elizabeth Nightingale. The story goes that a violent bolt of lightning so shocked her that she fell into her husband's arms and went into premature labour, dying while delivering a daughter who survived. Whether or not lightning was the cause, his wife's death in childbirth devastated Joseph, who had deeply loved her. He finished out his term in the Commons, but didn't stand again. Joseph's focus turned to his four children, but death continued to haunt the family, claiming Joseph's youngest son Robert first, then his namesake second son in 1741 at the age of 11. At the close of the decade, in 1749-50, Joseph decided a major geographic change would be beneficial to himself and his two surviving children. He purchased the beautiful Mamhead House in Devon, with the view that a West Country seat would add greatly to the legacy for his surviving son, Washington Gascoigne Nightingale, a promising young man in his early 20s. Joseph died just a couple years afterwards in 1752 at the age of 56, having never remarried. Washington commissioned the tomb for his parents in Westminster Abbey that haunts visitors to this day, but never lived to see it himself. He followed his father to the grave nineteen months later, at the young age of 26, and unmarried.
Wilmot Vaughan, 1st Earl of Lisburne (1728-1800)

At age 22, Elizabeth Nightingale found herself in the same position her father had been: a series of sudden deaths left her one of the most eligible heiresses in London, worth almost £300,000 a year. The suitor who won her hand was 26-year-old Wilmot Vaughan, the heir apparent to his father's Irish title of Viscount Lisburne and to his Welsh estate of Trawsgoed, the largest in the county of Cardiganshire. In addition Wilmot was heir presumptive to his mother's childless brother Thomas Watson, a politician from Berwick-on-Tweed who had an impressive estate in Northumberland. Wilmot married Elizabeth in London in July 1754, just four moths after the death of her brother Washington Nightingale.

Death, however, was not finished with the Nightingale family. Elizabeth quickly became pregnant, and in May 1755, just ten months after her wedding, she gave birth to a son and died ten days later from the resulting complications. Wilmot Vaughan was as devastated as his wife's father Joseph Nightingale had been 23 years previous. Unlike Joseph, he threw himself into, rather than retreated from, politics, and was first returned to Parliament in the December following his wife's death, beginning a career in the Commons that lasted for decades. Also unlike his father-in-law Joseph, Wilmot remarried, though the grieving widower waited nine years before doing so.
Earl of Lisburne full Heraldic Achievement
[Image from European Heraldry]

The only grandchild of Joseph and Lady Elizabeth Nightingale, the son whose birth had cost their daughter her life, was named Wilmot Vaughan, after his father and paternal grandfather. Young Wilmot spent his youth at Mamhead House, which his father, who loved it and preferred it over Trawsgoed, had made the family's chief seat[*1]. When Wilmot was age 11, his father succeeded his grandfather as Viscount Lisburne, and Wilmot was sent to Eton for education, as befitted a future peer. Afterwards he attended Magdalen College Oxford.  In 1776, Wilmot's father was elevated to an earldom, and 21-year-old Wilmot was entitled to the courtesy title of Viscount Lisburne. And it was around this time that the final tragedy to haunt the family became evident. Wilmot was going mad, and as the years wore on, it was apparent that the madness was permanent[*2]. He was 44 years old when his father died at the very beginning of 1800, and the law was clear: insanity could not preclude primogeniture. As the elder son, Wilmot inherited the title, becoming 2nd Earl of Lisburne, but "his lordship has laboured under a mental affection, which rendered it necessary to place his estates under the direction of trustees" [Obit in Annual Register]. Earl Lisburne spent the last twenty years of his life in seclusion, dying, three days shy of his sixty-fifth birthday, at Shillingthorpe Hall, a private asylum near Stamford, Lincolnshire, where the king himself, George III, was at various times a fellow patient [Lincolnshire Asylums: The Treatment of Mental Health Issues: Early Treatment]. A sad end to the line of the tragic family behind the dramatic tomb in Westminster Abbey.
Mamhead House, Devon, c.1830

[*1] One local "unfounded tradition" [Devonshire & Cornwall Illustrated, 1832] of Lady Elizabeth Nightingale's tragic sudden labour has her walking the grounds of Mamhead House when the violent bolt of lightning struck. The location is impossible for the event. Mamhead wasn't purchased by Joseph Gascoigne Nightingale until 1749-50, while Lady Elizabeth died in childbirth in 1731, and it is clear from her burial entry and the baptism entry of her daughter, that Lady Elizabeth was in London when she died. I cannot, however, locate a burial entry for Lady Elizabeth's daughter, Elizabeth (née Nightingale), Lady Lisburne, whose marriage brought Mamhead House to the Vaughan family in 1754. Could the local tradition apply instead to her own death in childbirth the following year, confusing mother and daughter? Lady Lisburne dying at Mamhead House in Devon could explain why no burial emerges from the thorough online London and Westminster parish register databases. Her son Wilmot Vaughan was baptized on 29 May 1755 at St George Hanover Square, twenty days after his birth, per the entry in the parish register, making it highly unlikely that his birth occurred two hundred miles away at Mamhead. But though the location is also impossible for this second fatal childbirth, it may still be that the lightning story applies to Wilmot's birth in 1755 rather than the 1731 birth of his mother, especially given that it was Lady Lisburne, not her mother Lady Nightingale, who had the association with Mamhead.

[*2] His obituary states that the 2nd Earl of Lisburne died "near Stamford," and as Shillingthorpe is often described as near Stamford, the inference is clear that the earl was in that asylum. The obituary also insinuates that Wilmot Vaughan did not become mad until about the time of his father's death. However, the circumstances of the earl's life - he made it through both Eton and Oxford, but then never married in the twenty-five ensuing years until his father's death - point to his likely having schizophrenia, the devastating mental illness that most men develop on average at age 18. The staff and tenants at Mamhead would have been well aware of Wilmot's madness, and this lends weight to the idea that the local legend of lightning causing a sudden early labour which killed the mother, described in the note above, is meant to apply to the birth of Wilmot, not that of his mother.
Shillingthorpe Hall, near Stamford, Lincolnshire
JOSEPH GASCOIGNE [later NIGHTINGALE] of Enfield, Middlesex, M.P. Stafford 1727-34, b. Rectory House, Enfield, bap. 19 Dec. 1695 St Andrew Church, Enfield; d. 16 July 1752 Rectory House, Enfield, bur. 25 July 1752 Westminster Abbey, 2nd son of Dr. Joseph Gascoigne of Enfield (1643-1721) and Anne Theobald (1655-1726 - see Generation B13 below); m. 24 June 1725 St George Hanover Square, London, Lady ELIZABETH SHIRLEY, bap. 26 Oct. 1703 St Mary Church, Nantwich, Cheshire; d. 17 Aug. 1731 London, bur. 26 Aug. 1731 Westminster Abbey, est dau. of Washington Shirley, 2nd Earl Ferrers (1677-1729, descended from Edward III - see Generation A15 below) and Mary Levinge (1684-1740), and had issue, three sons and one daughter.
St George Hanover Square, London

Issue of Joseph and Lady Elizabeth (Shirley) Nightingale:

1) WASHINGTON GASCOIGNE NIGHTINGALE of Mamhead House, Devon, b. 31 Dec. 1727 London, bap. 25 Jan. 1728 St George Hanover Square; d. unm. 25 Feb. 1754, bur. St John the Baptist Church, Hillingdon, Middlesex.

2) JOSEPH GASCOIGNE NIGHTINGALE, b. 29 Mar. 1729 London, bap. 27 Apr. 1729 St George Hanover Square; d. young, bur. 14 Mar. 1741 St Andrew Church, Enfield.

3) ROBERT GASCOIGNE NIGHTINGALE, b. 25 June 1730 London, bap. 23 July 1730 St George Hanover Square; d. young before 1741.

4) ELIZABETH NIGHTINGALE, b. 14 Aug. 1731 London, bap. 5 Sept. 1731 St George Hanover Square; d. 19 May 1755 London, bur. unknown; m. 3 July 1754 St George Hanover Square, as his 1st wife, WILMOT VAUGHAN, 1st Earl of Lisburnebap. 9 Jan. 1728 Holy Trinity Church, Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland; d. 6 Jan. 1800 Mamhead House, bur. 14 Jan. 1800 St Thomas Church, Mamhead, est. son of Wilmot Vaughan, 3rd Viscount Lisburne (c.1700-1766, descended from Edward III) and Elizabeth Watson (c.1705-1764), and had issue, one son.

Issue of Elizabeth (Nightingale) and 1st Earl of Lisburne:
Elizabeth Nightingale in Table III
of Ruvigny's Essex volume

4A) WILMOT VAUGHAN, 2nd Earl of Lisburne, b. 9 May1755 London, bap. 29 May 1755 St George Hanover Square; d. unm. 6 May 1820 Shillingthorpe Hall (asylum), Braceborough, Lincolnshire.

Elizabeth (née Nightingale), Lady Lisburne, along with her husband, their son and her parents, appears in Table III (p. 4) of Ruvigny's Essex volume. Following are her four lines of descent from Edward III through Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, including those that Ruvigny traces in his Essex and Mortimer-Percy volumes.

Isabel (née Plantagenet), Countess
of Essex
- see Generation A5
Edward III had a second surviving son,
A1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
A2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had a son A3 and a dau C3 (see below)
A3) Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March (1374-1398) m. Lady Alianore Holland (1370-1405, descended from Edward I), and had
A4) Lady Anne Mortimer (1388-1411) m. Richard of York, 3rd Earl of Cambridge (1385-1415, descended from Edward III), and had a dau A5 and a son B5 (see below)
A5) Lady Isabel Plantagenet (1409-1484) m. 2) Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex (1404-1483, descended from Edward III), and had
A6) William, Lord Bourchier (c.1428-1477) m. 2) Lady Anne Woodville (c.1448-1489), and had
A7) Cecily Bourchier (c.1473-1493) m. John Devereux, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Chartley (1464-1501, descended from Edward I), and had
A8) Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford (c.1491-1558) m. 1) Lady Mary Grey (c.1492-1538, descended from Edward III), and had
A9) Sir Richard Devereux of Lamphey (by 1513-1547) m. Lady Dorothy Hastings (c.1520-1566, descended from Edward III), and had
A10) Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex (1539-1576) m. Lettice Knollys (1543-1634, descended from Edward III), and had
A11) Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (1565-1601) m. Frances Walsingham (1567-1632, descended from Edward I), and had
A12) Lady Dorothy Devereux (1600-1636) m. 1) Sir Henry Shirley, 2nd Baronet of Staunton Harold (see C12 below), and had
1st Earl Ferrers - see
Generation A14
A13) Sir ROBERT SHIRLEY, 4th Baronet of Staunton Harold, b. 1629; d. 28 Nov. 1656 Tower of London, bur. 22 Dec. 1656 St Mary & St Hartulph Church, Breedon-on-the-Hill, Leicestershire; m. 1646, KATHERINE OKEOVER, b. 31 Aug. 1627 Okeover Hall, Staffordshire; d. 18 Oct. 1672 Staunton Harold Hall, Leicestershire, bur. 20 Oct. 1672 Holy Trinity Church, Staunton Harold, dau. of Humphrey Okeover of Okeover Hall (1605-1639) and Martha Cheney, and had
A14) ROBERT SHIRLEY, 1st Earl Ferrers, b. 20 Oct. 1650 East Sheen, Surrey, bap. 30 Oct. 1650 St Mary Church, Mortlake, Surrey; d. 25 Dec. 1717 Bath, Somersetshire, bur. 13 Jan. 1718 Holy Trinity Church, Staunton Harold; m. 1st 28 Dec. 1671, ELIZABETH WASHINGTON (see D12 below), and had
A15) WASHINGTON SHIRLEY, 2nd Earl Ferrers, b. 22 June 1677 Staunton Harold Hall, bap. St Mary & St Hartulph Church, Breedon-on-the-Hill; d. 14 Apr. 1729 Mayfair, London, bur. 3 May 1729 Holy Trinity Church, Staunton Harold; m. 1703, MARY LEVINGE, b. 1684; d. Jan. 1740 Paris, France, dau. of Sir Richard Levinge, 1st Baronet of High Park (1656-1724) and Mary Corbin (d. 1720), and had
A16) Lady Elizabeth Shirley (1703-1731 - see details above) m. Joseph Gascoigne Nightingale (see B14 below), and had
A17) Elizabeth Nightingale (1731-1755 - see details above) m. Wilmot Vaughan, 1st Earl of Lisburne

3rd Duke of York - see
Generation B5
B5) Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (1411-1460) m. Lady Cecily Neville (1415-1495, descended from Edward III), and had
B6) Anne Plantagenet, Duchess of Exeter (1439-1476) m. 2) Sir Thomas St Leger (by 1438-1483), and had
B7) Lady Anne St Leger (1475-1526) m. George Manners, 11th Lord Ros (1470-1513, descended from Edward I), and had
B8) Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland (c.1497-1543) m. 2) Eleanor Paston (c.1505-1551, descended from Edward I), and had
B9) Lady Katherine Manners (c.1540-1573) m. Henry Capell of Hadham Hall (c.1533-1588, descended from Edward I), and had
B10) Anne Capell (1566-1642) m. Sir Robert Chester of Royston Priory (1566-1640), and had
B11) Theodosia Chester (c.1605-1683) m. 1) Robert Nightingale, Heir of Newport Pond (c.1605-1639, descended from Edward I), and had
B12) Anne Nightingale (1625-1668) m. Sir Francis Theobald of Barking Hall (1621-1679), and had
B13) Anne Theobald (1655-1726) m. Dr. Joseph Gascoigne of Enfield (1643-1721), and had
B14) Joseph Gascoigne [later Nightingale] of Enfield (1695-1752 - see details above) m. Lady Elizabeth Shirley (see A16 above)

C3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
C4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Lady Eleanor Neville (1403-1472, descended from Edward III), and had
Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
- see Generation C9
C5) Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421-1461) m. Eleanor Poynings (1428-1484, descended from Edward I), and had
C6) Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland (c.1449-1489) m. Lady Maud Herbert (c.1457-by 1487), and had
C7) Lady Eleanor Percy (c.1476-1531) m. Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (1478-1521, descended from Edward III), and had
C8) Lady Elizabeth Stafford (1497-1558) m. Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk (1473-1554, descended from Edward I), and had
C9) Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1516-1547) m. Lady Frances de Vere (1517-1577, descended from Edward I), and had
C10) Lady Katherine Howard (1539-1596) m. Henry, 7th Lord Berkeley (1534-1613, descended from Edward I), and had
C11) Frances Berkeley (1564-1595) m. Sir George Shirley, 1st Baronet of Staunton Harold (1559-1622), and had
C12) Sir Henry Shirley, 2nd Baronet of Staunton Harold (1589-1633) m. Lady Dorothy Devereux (see A12 above)

Guise of Elmore Coat of Arms
D4) Lady Katherine Percy (1423-1493) m. Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent (1416-1490, descended from Edward III), and had
D5) Lady Anne Grey (b. c.1448) m. John Grey, 8th Lord Grey of Wilton (c.1445-1499, descended from Edward III), and had
D6) Tacy Grey (c.1488-1558) m. John Guise of Elmore Court (c.1485-1556, descended from Edward I), and had
D7) William Guise of Elmore Court (c.1514-1574) m. Mary Rotsey (d. 1558), and had
D8) John Guise of Elmore Court (c.1540-1588) m. Jane Pauncefoot (d. 1587), and had
D9) Sir William Guise of Elmore Court (1566-1642) m. 1) Margaret Kenn (d. 1595), and had
D10) William Guise of Elmore Court (1595-1653) m. Cecily Dennys (1597-1682, descended from Edward I)[*3], and had
Elizabeth (née Washington), Lady
Ferrers
 - see Generation D12
D11) ELEANOR GUISE, bap. 8 May 1624 St George Church, Brockworth, Gloucestershire; d. 19 July 1685, bur. All Saints Church, Garsdon, Wiltshire; m. 1st 17 Sept. 1644 St John the Baptist Church, Elmore, Gloucestershire, LAWRENCE WASHINGTON of Garsdon Manor, Wiltshire, bap. 30 Sept. 1622 St Dustan in the West, London; d. 17 Jan. 1662, bur. 11 Feb. 1662 All Saints Church, Garsdon, son of Sir Laurence Washington of Garsdon Manor (c.1579-1643) and Anne Lewin (d. 1645), and had
D12) ELIZABETH WASHINGTON, b. 1655; d. 2 Oct. 1693 Staunton Harold Hall, bur. 3 Oct. 1693 Holy Trinity Church, Staunton Harold; m. 28 Dec. 1671, as his 1st wife, Robert Shirley, 1st Earl Ferrers (see A14 above)

[*3] I'm one of those who feel there is not enough evidence to support Joan Stradling, the first wife of Maurice Dennys of Siston, as a daughter of Jane, daughter of Cardinal Henry Beaufort. But for those who feel that connection is valid, then Cecily Dennys, wife of William Guise of Elmore Court, would be a descendant of Edward III thru Cardinal Beaufort.

The next blogpost will look at a descent from Edward III for Elizabeth (née Crowley), Countess of Ashburnham, that is an addition to Ruvigny's Exeter volume.

Cheers,                     -----Brad

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Edward III Descents for 3rd Viscount Lisburne (c.1700-1766)

Vaughan of Trawsgoed Coat of Arms
[Sable, a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis argent]
One of the four great-grandfathers of Sir Lawrence Vaughan Palk, 3rd Baronet, ancestor of Hon. Annette Maria (née Palk) Baird, was Wilmot Vaughan, 3rd Viscount Lisburne. His first name was in honour of his maternal grandfather (whom he never knew), the infamous poet John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, the most debauched peer at the court of King Charles II, and the subject of the 2004 film The Libertine, where he is played by Johnny Depp. The second of three sons, Wilmot Vaughan left politics and the family's substantial Trawsgoed (aka Crosswood) estate in Cardiganshire to his elder brother John, who succeeded their father as as 2nd Viscount in 1721 when Wilmot was about age 21, and pursued a military career. While stationed in Berwick-on-Tweed, he married Elizabeth Watson, the daughter of a gentleman from that city who owned several substantial farms in Northumberland, chief of which was Grindonrigg House. When his brother the 2nd Viscount died in 1741, Wilmot Vaughan declared himself the successor to the Irish Viscountcy and the Vaughan family estates, but was challenged by his brother's widow and her son. Dorothy (née Hill), dowager Viscountess Lisburne, had separated from her husband in 1727, shortly after the birth of their daughter Malet. She returned to her father's house, 18 miles from Trawsgoed, and bore a son Edward in 1733, claiming that her estranged husband the 2nd Viscount Lisburne was the father. Years of litigation ensued, with Wilmot Vaughan ultimately triumphant in keeping the family estates and, in 1764, re-establishing the family's seat in the Irish House of Lords, though his death less than two years later prevented him from ever actually taking his seat in that House.

Through each of his parents, the 3rd Viscount Lisburne has several lines of descent from Edward III. The nine through that monarch's granddaughter Joan (née Beaufort), countess of Westmorland, are given below, as well as the one through her brother Cardinal Henry Beaufort.
Trawsgoed Mansion, Llanafan, Cardiganshire
WILMOT VAUGHAN, 3rd Viscount Lisburne, b. c.1700; d. 19 Jan. 1766 Trawsgoed Mansion, Llanafan, Cardiganshire, Wales, bur. Jan. 1766 St Hilary Church, Llanilar, Cardiganshire, 2nd son of John Vaughan, 1st Viscount Lisburne (c.1670-1721, descended from Edward III - see Generation A13 below) and Lady Malet Wilmot (1676-1709, descended from Edward III - see Generation G14 below); m. 16 Mar. 1727 St Cuthbert Church, Norham, Northumberland, ELIZABETH WATSON, b. c.1705; d. 19 Jan. 1764 Trawsgoed Mansion, dau. of Thomas Watson of Berwick-on-Tweed (d. 1739) and Margaret Clerk (d. 1741), and had issue, two sons and two daughters.

Issue of 3rd Viscount Lisburne and Elizabeth (Watson):
Dorothy (née Shafto),
Countess of Lisburne

(c.1733-1805)

1) WILMOT VAUGHAN, 1st Earl of Lisburnebap. 9 Jan. 1728 Holy Trinity Church, Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland; d. 6 Jan. 1800 Mamhead House, Devon, bur. 14 Jan. 1800 St Thomas Church, Mamhead; m. 1st 3 July 1754 St George Hanover Square, London, ELIZABETH NIGHTINGALE, b. 14 Aug. 1731 London, bap. 5 Sept. 1731 St George Hanover Square; d. 19 May 1755 London, bur. Westminster Abbey, only dau. of Joseph Gascoigne-Nightingale of Mamhead House (1695-1752, descended from Edward III) and Lady Elizabeth Shirley (1703-1731, descended from Edward III), and had issue, one son; m. 2nd 19 Apr. 1763 St Andrew Holborn, London, DOROTHY SHAFTO, b. c.1733; d. 12 Sept. 1805 Mamhead House, est. dau. of John Shafto of Whitworth Park (1692-1742, descended from Edward III) and Dorothy Jackson (c.1709-1768), and had further issue, one son and three daughters.

2) Hon. Sir JOHN VAUGHAN, Knight of the Bath, Governor of Berwick-on-Tweed 1780-95, M.P. Berwick 1774-95, bap. 3 May 1729 Holy Trinity Church, Berwick-on-Tweed; d. unm. 30 June 1795 Martinique, Lesser Antilles, West Indies.

3) MALET VAUGHAN, bap. 29 Oct. 1730 Holy Trinity Church, Berwick-on-Tweed; d. young.
St Peter Church, Carmarthen

4) Hon. ELIZABETH VAUGHAN, bap. 22 June 1741 St Oswald Church, Durham, co. Durham; d. Feb. 1817 Spilman Street, Carmarthen, Carmarthenshire, Wales, bur. 11 Feb. 1817 St Peter Church, Carmarthen; m. 11 July 1765 St Afan Church, Llanafan, Cardiganshire, THOMAS LLOYD of Abertrinant House, Llanfihangel-Y-Creuddyn, Cardiganshire, b. c.1720; d. Oct. 1784, est son of Morgan Lloyd of Abertrinant House (d. 1734) and Margaret Pryse[*1], and had issue, one daughter.

Issue of Hon. Elizabeth (Vaughan) and Thomas Lloyd:

4A) DOROTHY ELIZABETH LLOYD, b. 1766; d. 31 Jan. 1827 Laugharne, Carmarthenshire; m. 5 Jan. 1796 St Mary Church, Walcot, Bath, Somersetshire, Col. OWEN FORD LLOYD of Abertrinant House and of Cardigan, b. c.1755; d. 9 Nov. 1812 Cardigan, bur. St Cynllo Church, Llangoedmor, Cardiganshire, 2nd son of Thomas Lloyd of Bronwydd Castle (d. 1768, descended from Henry IV) and Anne Lloyd (descended from Edward III), and had issue, four sons and four daughters.

[*1] A 1997 Welsh-language article 'Twf a diflaniad ystadau Dyffryn Ystwyth' by Gerald Morgan in Ceredigion: Journal of the Cardiganshire Antiquarian Society, makes mention (on p. 36) of Thomas Lloyd of Abertrinant, his parents, and his wife Hon. Elizabeth. The Lloyds of Abertrinant were "the same sept or tribe as those of Coedmore," but I haven't yet uncovered a pedigree of the family. Thomas Lloyd was dead by July 1793, per a deed involving his daughter Dorothy Elizabeth. The January 1784 death date given erroneously for his wife Hon. Elizabeth in late-18th century peerage works is thus likely instead the date of Thomas's death. Abertrinant House was abandoned by the Lloyds in the late 18th-century, and fell into a ruinous state.
3rd Lord Abergavenny -
see Generation A3

Edward III had a 3rd surviving son
A1) John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (1340-1399) m. 3) Katherine Roet (c.1350-1403), and had a dau A2 and a son J2 (see below)
A2) Lady Joan Beaufort (c.1377-1440) m. 2) Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland (1364-1425), and had two sons A3 and I3, and three daus D3, F3 and H3 (see below)
A3) Edward Neville, 3rd Lord Abergavenny (c.1417-1476) m. twice, and had a son A4 and a dau C4 (see below)
A4) George Neville, 4th Lord Abergavenny, by 1st wife (1440-1492) m. 1) Margaret Fenne (c.1444-1485), and had a dau A5 and a son B5 (see below)
A5) Elizabeth Neville (b. c.1471) m. Thomas Berkeley, Heir of Beverstone Castle (c.1470-1500), and had
A6) Elizabeth Berkeley (b. c.1495) m. Sir George Herbert of Swansea (1494-1570), and had
A7) Matthew Herbert of Cogan Pill House (d. by 1557) m. Mary Gamage, and had
Sir John Vaughan - see
Generation A11
A8) Elizabeth Herbert (d. 1571) m. Sir Henry Jones of Abermarlais (c.1532-1586, descended from Edward I), and had
A9) Sir Thomas Jones of Abermarlais (1554-1604) m. Jane Puleston, and had
A10) Agnes Jones (d. aft.1635) m. 1) John Stedman of Plas Cilcennin (d. by 1624), and had
A11) Jane Stedman (1611-1680) m. Sir John Vaughan of Trawsgoed (1603-1674), and had
A12) Edward Vaughan of Trawsgoed (c.1635-1684) m. Letitia Hooker (see B10 below), and had
A13) John Vaughan, 1st Viscount Lisburne (c.1670-1721) m. Lady Malet Wilmot (see G14 below), and had
A14) Wilmot Vaughan, 3rd Viscount Lisburne (c.1700-1766) - see details above

B5) George Neville, 5th Lord Abergavenny (1469-1535) m. 2) Lady Mary Stafford (see D7 below), and had
B6) Dorothy Neville (c.1527-1559) m. William Brooke, 10th Lord Cobham (see C7 below), and had
B7) Frances Brooke (1549-by 1598) m. Thomas Coppinger of Allhallows House (1546-1580), and had
B8) Francis Coppinger of Allhallows House (1577-aft.1626) m. Hon. Frances Burgh (see E9 below), and had
B9) Lettice Coppinger (1609-by 1673) m. 2) Sir William Hooker of Greenwich (1612-1697), and had
9th Lord Cobham - see
Generation C6
B10) Letitia Hooker (1645-1717) m. Edward Vaughan of Trawsgoed (see A12 above)

C4) Margaret Neville, by 2nd wife (c.1455-1506) m. John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (c.1447-1512, descended from Edward I), and had
C5) Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham (c.1475-1529) m. 1) Dorothy Heydon (c.1477-by 1515), and had
C6) George Brooke, 9th Lord Cobham (c.1497-1558) m. Anne Bray (c.1510-1558), and had
C7) William Brooke, 10th Lord Cobham (1527-1597) m. 1) Dorothy Neville (see B6 above)

D3) Lady Anne Neville (c.1408-1480) m. 1) Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of 
Buckingham (1402-1460, descended from Edward III), and had a son D4 and a dau E4 (see below)
D4) Humphrey, Earl of Stafford (c.1425-1458) m. Lady Margaret Beaufort (c.1437-1474, descended from Edward III), and had
D5) Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (1455-1483) m. Lady Katherine Woodville (c.1458-1497), and had
3rd Duke of Buckingham -
see Generation D6
D6) Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (1478-1521) m. Lady Eleanor Percy (see F6 below), and had
D7) Lady Mary Stafford (c.1503-by 1529) m. George Neville, 5th Lord Abergavenny (see B5 above)

E4) Lady Anne Stafford (c.1430-1472) m. 2) Thomas, 5th Lord Cobham of Sterborough (c.1415-1471), and had
E5) Anne, 6th Lady Cobham of Sterborough (by 1467-1526) m. 2) Edward, 2nd Lord Burgh of Gainsborough (1464-1528, descended from Edward I), and had
E6) Thomas, 3rd Lord Burgh of Gainsborough (by 1488-1550) m. 1) Agnes Tyrwhitt (b. c.1488), and had
E7) William, 4th Lord Burgh of Gainsborough (1522-1584) m. Lady Katherine Fiennes de Clinton (c.1537-1621, descended from Edward I), and had
E8) Thomas, 5th Lord Burgh of Gainsborough (1558-1597) m. Frances Vaughan (c.1557-1647, descended from Edward I), and had
E9) Hon. Frances Burgh (c.1588-1618) m. Francis Coppinger of Allhallows House (see B8 above)

F3) Lady Eleanor Neville (1403-1472) m. 2) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455, descended from Edward III), and had a son F4 and a dau G4 (see below)
Percy Coat of Arms
F4) Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421-1461) m. Eleanor Poynings (1428-1484, descended from Edward I), and had
F5) Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland (c.1449-1489) m. Lady Maud Herbert (c.1457-by 1487), and had
F6) Lady Eleanor Percy (c.1476-1531) m. Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (see D6 above)

G4) Lady Katherine Percy (1423-1493) m. Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent (1416-1490, descended from Edward III), and had
G5) Lady Anne Grey (b. c.1448) m. John Grey, 8th Lord Grey of Wilton (c.1445-1499, descended from Edward III), and had
G6) Edmund, 9th Lord Grey of Wilton (by 1468-1511) m. Florence Hastings, and had
G7) Elizabeth Grey (c.1500-1559) m. John Brydges, 1st Baron Chandos of Sudeley (1492-1557), and had
G8) Elizabeth Brydges (b. c.1520) m. Henry Tracy of Toddington (d. 1557), and had
Malet (née Wilmot),
Viscountess Lisburne
-
see Generation G14
G9) Sir John Tracy of Toddington (c.1540-1591) m. Anne Throckmorton (d. 1581, descended from Edward I), and had
G10) John, 1st Viscount Tracy of Rathcoole (c.1561-1648) m. Anne Shirley (b. 1573, descended from Edward I), and had
G11) Hon. Anne Tracy (c.1595-1670) m. John Malet of Elmore Hall (see J10 below), and had
G12) John Malet of Enmore Hall (1629-1656) m. Unton Hawley (see I12 below), and had
G13) Elizabeth Malet (1651-1681) m. John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (see H10 below), and had
G14) Lady Malet Wilmot (1676-1709) m. John Vaughan, 1st Viscount Lisburne (see A13 above)

H3) Lady Katherine Neville (c.1399-1483) m. 2) Sir Thomas Strangways (d. by 1443), and had
H4) Joan Strangways (c.1440-1485) m. 1) Sir William Willoughby of Parham (d. 1468), and had
H5) Cecily Willoughby (b. c.1465) m. Edward Sutton, 2nd Lord Dudley (c.1459-1532, descended from Edward I), and had
H6) Joyce Dudley (c.1505-1586) m. 1) John Leighton of Wattlesborough Castle (d. 1532, descended from Edward I), and had
H7) Sir Thomas Leighton of Feckenham (c.1530-1610) m. Elizabeth Knollys (b. 1549, descended from Edward III)[*2], and had
Dame Anne (née Leighton) St John
- see Generation H8
H8) Anne Leighton (1591-1628) m. Sir John St John, 1st Baronet of Lydiard Tregoze (1585-1648, descended from Edward I), and had
H9) Anne St John (1614-1696) m. 2) Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester (1613-1658), and had
H10) John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647-1680) m. Elizabeth Malet (see G13 above)

[*2] The maternal grandmother of Dame Elizabeth (née Knollys) Leighton was Lady Mary (née Boleyn) Carey. The notorious Earl of Rochester (see H10 above) was thus a 6-generation mtDNA descendant of the 'Other Boleyn Girl'.

I3) Richard Neville, 1st Earl of Salisbury (c.1398-1460) m. Lady Alice Montagu (1406-1462, descended from Edward I), and had
I4) Lady Alice Neville (c.1434-aft.1503) m. Henry, 6th Lord Fitzhugh (1429-1472), and had
1st Baron Norris - see
Generation I8
I5) Alice Fitzhugh (c.1452-1516) m. Sir John Fiennes, Heir of Dacre (c.1447-c.1482, descended from Edward I), and had
I6) Thomas Fiennes, 8th Lord Dacre (1472-1533) m. Anne Bourchier (1470-aft.1530, descended from Edward III), and had
I7) Mary Fiennes (c.1497-1531) m. Sir Henry Norris of Bray (c.1491-1536, descended from Edward I), and had
I8) Henry, 1st Baron Norris of Bray (c.1525-1601) m. Margery Williams (d. 1599), and had
I9) Katherine Norris (c.1560-1602) m. Sir Anthony Paulet of Hinton St George (1562-1600), and had
I10) Elizabeth Paulet (d. aft.1642) m. Sir Henry Hawley of Wiveliscombe (d. 1623), and had
I11) Francis, 1st Baron Hawley of Duncannon (1608-1684) m. Jane Gibbs, and had
I12) Unton Hawley m. 1) John Malet of Enmore Hall (see G12 above)

J2) Henry Beaufort, Cardinal Bishop of Winchester (1375-1447) = unknown mistress, and had
J3) Jane Beaufort, illegit. (c.1402-1479) m. Sir Edward Stradling of St Donats Castle (c.1389-1453), and had
Joan (née Stradling) Popham
- see Generation J7
J4) Sir Henry Stradling of St Donats Castle (c.1423-1476) m. Elizabeth ap Thomas, and had
J5) Thomas Stradling of St Donats Castle (c.1454-1480) m. Jennet Matthew (d. 1485), and had
J6) Sir Edward Stradling of St Donats (c.1472-1535) m. Elizabeth Arundell (d. 1513), and had
J7) Joan Stradling m. 2) Alexander Popham of Huntworth (by 1504-1556), and had
J8) Sir John Popham of Wellington (c.1531-1607) m. Amy Adams (d. 1612), and had
J9) Mary Popham m. Sir John Malet of Enmore Hall (c.1573-1616, descended from Edward I), and had
J10) John Malet of Enmore Hall (1593-1644) m. Hon. Anne Tracy (see G11 above)

The next blogpost will look at the tragic story and ancestry of Elizabeth Nightingale, first wife of Wilmot Vaughan, 1st Earl of Lisburne.

Cheers,                                  ------Brad

Friday, August 19, 2016

Ruvigny Addition: Mortimer/Percy Descent for Sir Lawrence Vaughan Palk, 3rd Bt (1793-1860)

Sir Lawrence Palk, 2nd Baronet (1766-1813), with his wife
Lady Dorothy (née Vaughan) and their three eldest children
Continuing with the ancestry of Hon. Annette Maria (née Palk) Baird, mother of Muriel Jane (née Baird) Noel, we have her paternal grandfather Sir Lawrence Vaughan Palk, 3rd Baronet of Haldon House. A politician like his father and both grandfathers before him, Sir Lawrence's middle name was in honour of his mother's family, the Vaughans of Trawsgoed estate, the most important family in Cardiganshire, elevated to the Irish peerage as Viscounts Lisburne in 1695, nearly one hundred years before Sir Lawrence's birth. Seventeen years before he was born, Sir Lawrence's maternal grandfather had been created Earl of Lisburne. He died in January 1800, at the dawn of the 19th-century, when Lawrence was only six years old, leaving a crisis that no doubt had an influence on Lawrence's mother Lady Dorothy Palk. Her half-brother Wilmot Vaughan, the product of her father's tragic first marriage, had been legally declared insane. He inherited the earldom in name only, with Lady Dorothy's brother of the full-blood, the politician John Vaughan, M.P., serving as the de facto head of the family for the next twenty years, until their half-brother died in 1820, and John was able to inherit the earldom and the family's seat in the Irish House of Lords.

Lady DOROTHY ELIZABETH VAUGHAN, b. 13 May 1764 Mamhead House, Devon, bap. 6 Jan. 1765 St Thomas Church, Mamhead; d. 15 Feb. 1849 Mayfair, London, bur. 23 Feb. 1849 St Andrew Church, Enfield, Middlesex, est dau. of Wilmot Vaughan, 1st Earl of Lisburne (1728-1800, descended from Edward III - see Generation 16 below) and his 2nd wife Dorothy Shafto (c.1733-1805, descended from Edward III); m. 15 May 1792 Harley Street, Marylebone, London, as his 2nd wife, Sir LAWRENCE PALK, 2nd Baronet of Haldon House, bap. 6 Mar. 1766 Fort St George, Madras, India; d. 20 June 1813 Mayfair, London, bur. 3 July 1813 St George Church, Shillingford, Devon, son of Sir Robert Palk, 1st Baronet of Haldon House (1717-1798) and Anne Vansittart (1738-1788, descended from Henry IV), and had issue, six sons and two daughters.

Issue of Lady Dorothy Elizabeth (Vaughan) and Sir Lawrence Palk, 2nd Bt:
Palk of Haldon Coat of Arms
[Sable, an eagle, displayed, argent,
beaked and membered or, within a
bordure, engrailed, of the second
]

1) Sir LAWRENCE VAUGHAN PALK, 3rd Baronet of Haldon House, b. 25 Apr. 1793 Westminster, London, bap. 30 May 1793 St George Hanover Square; d. 16 May 1860 Haldon House, bur. 23 May 1860 St Michael & All Angels Church, Dunchideock, Devon; m. 1st 9 Dec. 1815 St Peter Church, Tawstock, Devon, as her 2nd husband, his first cousin, ANNA ELEANORA (WREY) HARTOPP, b. 12 Jan. 1787 Tawstock Court, bap. 18 Jan. 1787 St Peter Church, Tawstock; d. 25 Jan. 1846 Dieppe, Normandy, France, widow of Edward Hartopp of Little Dalby Hall (1783-1813, descended from Henry IV), and only dau. of Sir Bourchier Wrey, 7th Baronet of Trebeigh (1757-1826, descended from Edward III) and his 1st wife Anne Palk (1764-1791, descended from Henry IV), and had issue, three sons and two daughters; m. 2nd c.1848 France [per HOP], PHILIPPINE ANNE VICTOIRE ---, d. 12 Feb. 1855 Versailles, France, and had further issue, one daughter.

2) ROBERT JOHN PALK of Belgrave Square, London, barrister-at-law, b. 15 May 1794; d. 20 Mar. 1870 The Mount, Torquay, Devon; m. 5 Aug. 1828 Trinity Church, St Marylebone, London, HARRIETTE HIBBERT, b. 30 Jan. 1804 Clapham, Surrey, bap. 28 Feb. 1804 Holy Trinity Church, Clapham; d. 1 Mar. 1841 Heath Farm Court, Watford, Hertfordshire, bur. 10 Mar. 1841 St John the Baptist Church, Aldenham, Hertfordshire, yst. dau. of George Hibbert of Munden House, merchant (1757-1837) and Elizabeth Margaret Fonnereau (1765-1841), and had issue, three sons and one daughter.

Issue of Robert John and Harriette (Hibbert) Palk:

2A) ROBERT GEORGE LAWRENCE PALK, bap. 13 July 1829 St George Hanover Square, London; d. young 18 June 1838 Belgravia, London, bur. 23 June 1838 Holy Trinity Church, Clapham.

2B) ELIZABETH MALLET PALK, b. 13 Apr. 1831 Park Square, London, bap. 15 June 1831 St Marylebone Parish Church, London; d. unm. 10 July 1878 South Kensington, London.

2C) ASHLEY PALK of the Inner Temple, London, b. 21 Jan. 1834 Park Square, London, bap. 22 Mar. 1834 Trinity Church, St Marylebone, London; d. unm. 7 Oct. 1860 Torquay, Devon, bur. 13 Oct. 1860 Torquay Cemetery.

2D) WILMOT HENRY PALK of Pimlico, London, clerk in House of Lords, b. 29 Nov. 1835 Mayfair, London, bap. 27 Jan. 1836 St George Hanover Square; d. 13 June 1876 Pimlico; m. 1867 London, ELIZABETH ALEXANDRINA GREIG MACKENZIE, b. 1846 Waterford, Co. Waterford, Ireland; d. 1 Apr. 1912 Brooke House, Upper Clapton, Hackney, Middlesex, est. dau. of John Mackenzie of Golspie Mills and Jamesina Junner (b. 1824)[*1], and had issue, three sons and three daughters.

Sir Horace Beauchamp Seymour
(1791-1851)
3) ELIZABETH MALLET PALK, b. 24 May 1795; d. 18 Jan. 1827 Hampton Court Palace, Middlesex, bur. 26 Jan. 1827 St Mary Church, Hampton; m. 15 May 1818 St George Hanover Square, London, as his 1st wife, Sir HORACE BEAUCHAMP SEYMOUR of Mayfair, M.P. Lisburn 1819-26, 1847-51, M.P. Bodmin 1826-32, b. 22 Nov. 1791 London; d. 21 Nov. 1851 Brighton, Sussex, 3rd son of Admiral Lord Hugh Seymour of Hambledon (1759-1801, descended from Charles II) and Lady Anne Horatia Waldegrave (1762-1801, descended from James II), and had issue, two sons and one daughter[*2].

4) Rev. WILMOT HENRY PALK, Rector of Ashcombe, Devon 1820-85, b. 24 Oct. 1796 London, bap. 15 Dec. 1796 St George Hanover Square; d. unm. 28 July 1885 Ashcombe, bur. 3 Aug. 1885 St Nectan Church, Ashcombe.

5) MARY PALK, b. 14 May 1799; d. 23 July 1851 Enfield, Middlesex; m. 27 Aug. 1835 St James Church, Westminster, as his 1st wife, her first cousin, ERNEST AUGUSTUS VAUGHN, 4th Earl of Lisburne, b. 30 Oct. 1800 London, bap. 6 Dec. 1800 St George Hanover Square; d. 8 Nov. 1873 Trawsgoed Mansion, Llanafan, Cardiganshire, Wales, bur. 14 Nov. 1873 St Afan Church, Llanafan, 2nd son of John Vaughan, 3rd Earl of Lisburne (1769-1831, descended from Edward III) and Lucy Courtenay (1770-1821, descended from Edward III), and had issue, three sons and one daughter.

6) Maj. JOHN PALK, commander depot companies 32nd Regiment, b. 25 Apr. 1801 London, bap. 11 June 1801 St George Hanover Square; d. unm. 4 Oct. 1838 Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland.

7) EDWARD PALK, Royal Navy, b. 2 June 1804 London, bap. 5 July 1804 St George Hanover Square; d. unm. 22 Jan. 1821 H.M.S. Spey, Gibraltar.
T.E. Lawrence 'of Arabia'

8) Rev. ARTHUR GEORGE PALK, b. 16 July 1806 London, bap. 18 July 1806 St George Hanover Square; d. unm. 27 Nov. 1835 Torquay, Devon, bur. 3 Dec. 1835 St Michael & All Angels Church, Dunchideock.

[*1] Elizabeth (née Mackenzie) Palk was a first cousin once removed to British diplomat Thomas Edward Lawrence (1888-1935), known today as Lawrence of Arabia. Lawrence's mother, the Scottish governess Sarah Junner, was the illegitimate daughter of Elizabeth Junner (b. 1828), the younger sister of Jamesina (née Junner) Mackenzie (b. 1824), mother of Elizabeth Palk. The Junner sisters were daughters of George Junner and Simonia Somervil Bissat Wilkes.

[*2] Dame Elizabeth Mallet (née Palk) Seymour, through her daughter Adelaide, Countess Spencer (1825-1877), is an ancestress of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Sir William Hooker of London and Greenwich (1612-1697)
The Vaughan family of Trawsgoed, starting as far back as the 1st Viscount Lisburne (see Generation 14 below), should have appeared in Ruvigny's 1911 Mortimer-Percy volume. The Marquis traced the line down to Lettice (née Coppinger) Hooker (see Generation 12 below), who appears with her two husbands on p. 490, with no indication of issue. It's not surprising that Ruvigny couldn't take the line any further. The Hooker family of London and The Grange on Crooms Hill in Greenwich was not one that received attention from the Victorian-era genealogists of Ruvigny's time, perhaps because the family only survived for two generations. Lettice's second husband Sir William Hooker was a wealthy London merchant and member of the Grocers' Company who served as an alderman for over two decades, and terms as Sheriff and Lord Mayor of London. I've yet to locate a pedigree for this Hooker family. Per his M.I. in St Alfege Church, Greenwich, Sir William Hooker and his first wife Lettice Coppinger had three sons and four daughters. These were: John Hooker (1641-1642); Anne Hooker (1643-1703), wife of Sir John Lethieullier of Lewisham (1633-1719); Letitia Hooker (1645-1717), wife of Edward Vaughan of Trawsgoed (c.1635-1684); William Hooker, M.P. Bossiney 1702-05 (1647-1718), who had four daughters, and at whose death the male line of Sir William Hooker was extinguished; Elizabeth Hooker (b. c.1648), wife of John Tregagle of Trevorder, M.P. Bossiney 1679 (1644-1680); Katherine Hooker (b. 1650), died unmarried; and a third son who died young.
Ruvigny's account of Dame Lettice (Coppinger) (Barnaby) Hooker on p. 490 of the 1911 Mortimer-Percy volume
Following is the 18-generation descent from Edward III thru his great-granddaughter Lady Elizabeth (Mortimer) Percy, for Sir Lawrence Vaughan Palk, 3rd Baronet.

Edward III had a 2nd surviving son
Lady Elizabeth (née Mortimer) Percy
- see Generation 3
1) Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence (1338-1368) m. 1) Lady Elizabeth de Burgh (1332-1363, descended from Edward I), and had
2) Lady Philippa Plantagenet of Clarence (1355-1377) m. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March (1352-1381), and had
3) Lady Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy (1364-1403), and had
4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Lady Eleanor Neville (1403-1472, descended from Edward III), and had
5) Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421-1461) m. Eleanor Poynings (1428-1484, descended from Edward I), and had
6) Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland (c.1449-1489) m. Lady Maud Herbert (c.1457-by 1487), and had
7) Lady Eleanor Percy (c.1476-1531) m. Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (1478-1521, descended from Edward III), and had
8) Lady Mary Stafford (c.1503-by 1529) m. George Neville, 5th Lord Abergavenny (1469-1535, descended from Edward III), and had
Coppinger of Allhallows Coat of Arms
9) Dorothy Neville (c.1527-1559) m. William Brooke, 10th Lord Cobham (1527-1597, descended from Edward III), and had
10) Frances Brooke (1549-by 1598) m. Thomas Coppinger of Allhallows House (1546-1580), and had
11) Francis Coppinger of Allhallows House (1577-aft.1626) m. Hon. Frances Burgh (c.1588-1618, descended from Edward III), and had
12) Lettice Coppinger (1609-by 1673) m. 2) Sir William Hooker of Greenwich (1612-1697), and had
13) LETITIA HOOKER, b. The Grange, Crooms Hill, Greenwich, Kent, bap. 14 Aug. 1645 St Allege Church, Greenwich; d. by 2 May 1717 (when will was proved); m. 13 Apr. 1665 St Luke Church, Old Charlton, Kent, EDWARD VAUGHAN of Trawsgoed, Llanafan, Cardiganshire, Wales, M.P. Cardiganshire 1669, 1679-81, b. c.1635; d. 15 Feb. 1684, bur. 26 Feb. 1684 St Lawrence Church, Ludlow, Shropshire, son of Sir John Vaughan of Trawsgoed (1603-1674) and Jane Stedman (1611-1680, descended from Edward III), and had
14) JOHN VAUGHAN, 1st Viscount Lisburne, b. c.1670; d. 20 Mar. 1721, bur. 5 Apr. 1721 St Alfege Church, Greenwich; m. 18 Aug. 1692 St Giles in the Fields, London, Lady MALET WILMOT, b. Adderbury House, Oxfordshire, bap. 6 Jan. 1676 St Mary Church, Adderbury; d. 13 Jan. 1709, 3rd dau. of John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647-1680, descended from Edward III) and Elizabeth Malet (1651-1681, descended from Edward III), and had
Vaughan of Trawsgoed Coat of Arms
15) WILMOT VAUGHAN, 3rd Viscount Lisburne, b. c.1700; d. 4 Feb. 1766 Trawsgoed Mansion, bur. St Hilary Church, Llanilar, Cardiganshire; m. Dec. 1727, ELIZABETH WATSON, b. c.1705; d. 19 Jan. 1764 Trawsgoed Mansion, dau. of Thomas Watson of Berwick-on-Tweed (d. 1739) and Margaret Clerk (d. 1741), and had
16) WILMOT VAUGHAN, 1st Earl of Lisburne, bap. 9 Jan. 1728 Holy Trinity Church, Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland; d. 6 Jan. 1800 Mamhead House, Devon, bur. 14 Jan. 1800 St Thomas Church, Mamhead; m. 2nd 19 Apr. 1763 St Andrew Holborn, London, DOROTHY SHAFTO, b. c.1733; d. 12 Sept. 1805 Mamhead House, est. dau. of John Shafto of Whitworth Park (1692-1742, descended from Edward III) and Dorothy Jackson (c.1709-1768), and had
17) Lady Dorothy Elizabeth Vaughan (1764-1849-see details above) m. Sir Lawrence Palk, 2nd Baronet of Haldon House (1766-1813, descended from Henry IV), and had
18) Sir Lawrence Vaughan Palk, 3rd Baronet of Haldon House (1793-1860-see details above)

The next blogpost will look at additional Edward III descents for Wilmot Vaughan, 3rd Viscount Lisburne.

Cheers,                              -----Brad